Raiders fall to Cascade 47-56 in district consolation game

As the TSSAA District 8 Tournament concluded this week several MCHS players earned honors. (Andrew Copeland, Riley Holman, and Brayden Cashion earned All Season recognition. (Photos courtesy of Jeff Reed Photography)

BEDFORD COUNTY — Second effort points by Cascade and low fourth period scoring from the Raiders told the story Thursday night as Moore County lost to Cascade 47-56 in the District 8 consolation game.

The Raiders went into the fourth quarter down by just four points with a clear path to the W but missed shots and Cascade’s second efforts scores sealed the game. The Raiders shot just 5-19 from the floor and 7-17 from the three point line against the Champions.

The two teams traded losses in the regular district season. Cascade beat the Raiders in Lynchburg on January 19 by a final of 56-65. Moore County returned the favor on February 5 at Cascade by beating the Champions, 55-51. Cascade (1) and Moore County (2) came into the District Tournament ranked in the top spots but lost to Fayetteville and Eagleville respectively to match up in the consolation game. With the win, Cascade earned a three seed match up against two seed Merrol Hyde in the Regional Quarterfinals. The Raiders will now face number one seed LEAD Academy on Saturday.

Moore County dominated the first period. They gained the lead at the 2:50 mark thanks to a pair of free throw shots by Dylan Scruggs to go up 7-6. Cascade’s Alex Allison answered with a lay up. Three point shots by Riley Holman and Colton Bateman helped the Raiders end the period with a 12-10 lead.

Brayden Cashion and Riley Hollman earned All Tournament honors. (Photos Credit: Jeff Reed Photography)

The Raiders maintained their lead at halftime thanks in part to outstanding defense play by Andrew Copeland who managed five blocked shots in eight minutes. Cascade also wandered into early foul trouble sending Raider shooters to the line eight times in the first half of play. Copeland shot a perfect 4-4 from the line and Dylan Scruggs shot 7-8. A trey by Brayden Cashion and a jumper by Will Harder in the last two minutes helped the Raiders manage a 21-19 lead at the half.

The Raiders needed to keep Cascade high scorer Alex Allison out of the paint in the second half in order to be successful. That’s exactly what didn’t happen. Allison managed his way to the goal and through Raider players for nine second half points. Many of those points were second effort scores from Allison snagging his own rebound. Despite being outscored by Cascade in the third, three point shots by Andrew Copeland and Will Harder helped the Raiders only trail by two, 35-37, at the break.

Copeland‘s defensive efforts showed up in fouls. He started the fourth period on the bench with four. The Raiders trails by as many as eight points before Riley Hollman got them back within six with a jumper. Cascade fouled Dylan Scruggs on two consecutive plays and his 3-4 from the line got the Raiders back within three, 43-46. Allison and Jackson Davis then went back to work in the paint to get Cascade ahead 47-53 with less than a minute remaining. Moore County fouled Allison with thirty second to play. He made both giving Cascade an eight point lead that essentially put it out of reach. At the final buzzer, it was Raiders 47, Champions 56.

Riley Holman led for the Raiders with 10 points. Will Harder and Andrew Copeland followed with nine each. Dylan Scruggs and Brayden Cashion scored seven point each and Colton Bateman added five. Alex Allison led for Cascade with 17.

The Raiders now move on to Class A East Region action and will face District 7 number one seed LEAD Academy in Nashville on Saturday, February 27 at 7 p.m. To view a full bracket, click here. LEAD Academy only allows two tickets per player but local fans can watch via the NFHS Network thank to the MCHS Sport Network student broadcasting crew. Click here for that link. •

{The Lynchburg Times is an independently owned and operated newspaper in Lynchburg, Tennessee. We cover Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

Raiderettes edge Tigers for three seed in Regional tournament

Charlotte Ray and Chloe Brazier are all smile Wednesday night after helping defeat the Fayetteville Tigers for the fourth time this season. Brazier led the Raiderettes with 16 points and Ray lead scoring in the second half and finished with 13 total points. (Photo Credit: Jeff Reed Photography)

MOORE COUNTY — It’s hard to beat a team four times in the same season, but the Moore County girls basketball team did just that on Wednesday with 64-54 victory over District 8 rival the Fayetteville Tigers.

Moore County placed their Colombia blue foot on the gas pedal and never let up until the final buzzer. They edged the Tigers last night in Lynchburg in a District 8 game to earn a three seed at the Class A East Regional Quarterfinals. They mounted a 14 point lead in the first half thanks in part to the lights out play of sophomore Maecy Fletcher and junior Chloe Brazier. The two Raiderette starters combined for 19 of Moore County’s 35 first quarter points.

Strong, steady Raiderette first half

Moore County came out of the gate swinging with back-to-back three point shots by Robin Smedley and Charlotte Ray. The sluggish Tigers, on the other hand, took seven shots before finally landing a point – a free throw by Amaria Thomison at the four minute mark. Fletcher found much of her first half success at the bonus line as Tiger defenders continuously swatted at her on her way to the basket. She shot 7-8 from the line in the first half of play. Chloe Brazier got hot in the second period with three baskets and a trey. The Raiderettes led at the break, 35-21.

Tigers attempt a second half comeback

Following the break, the Tigers found their footing. They outscored the Raiderettes by eight in the third period thanks in part to a pair of three point shots by Shaneka Nance. Treys by Moore County’s Charlotte Ray and Hayley Horton helped the Raiderettes keep pace and they ended the third stanza still ahead by six, 47-41.

Vance continued to mount a single-handed come back in the fourth period putting up another seven for a total of 15 second half points but the Raiderette defense never panicked. In fact, they took an aggressive, man stance to block shots, make steals, and force turnovers. Charlotte Ray, in particular, played strong down the stretch with smart defense and seven fourth period points.

Chloe Brazier led the Raiderettes with 16 total points followed by Charlotte Ray and Maecy Fletcher with 13 each. Other Moore County scoring totals were: Robin Smedley, 7; Hayley Horton, 6; Erica Clifton, 5; Madison Floyd and Paisley Logan, 2 points each.

The Raiderettes now move on to Class A East Region action and will face District 7 number two seed LEAD Academy in Nashville on Friday, February 26 at 7 p.m. Fayettevile will move on to play Merro Hyde. To view a full bracket, click here. LEAD Academy only allows two tickets per player but local fans can watch via the NFHS Network thank to the MCHS Sport Network student broadcasting crew. Click here for that link. •

{The Lynchburg Times is an independently owned and operated newspaper in Lynchburg, Tennessee. We cover Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

State will lift nursing home visitation restrictions on February 28

STATE NEWS | The Tennessee Department of Health announced on Wednesday that they would be lifting visitation restrictions for long-term care facilities effective Sunday, February 28, according to a press release.

TDH officials stated that they are making the move now that a sufficient number of nursing home residents and staff have received COVID-19 vaccinations. According to state, 100 percent of Tennessee’s nursing homes and skilled nursing facilities have completed both doses of COVID-19 vaccinations, and Tennessee’s assisted care living facilities and residential homes for the aged are projected to be completed this week.

“The health and safety of vulnerable Tennesseans, especially our long-term care residents, remains our top priority, and our comprehensive and persistent efforts to protect this population from COVID-19 have saved lives,” said Tennessee Health Commissioner Lisa Piercey, MD, MBA, FAAP. “Now that vaccinations at all long-term care facilities are nearing completion, we are ready to transition to a more sustainable approach of following these best practices for safe operation of long-term care facilities in Tennessee.”

Moving forward, the state says that facilities should use the federal Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services guidance for safe operation and visitation with limited visitation restrictions no longer in place at the state level.

Those guidelines state that nursing homes may allow indoor visitation when there has been no new onset of COVID-19 cases in the last 14 days and the facility is not currently conducting outbreak testing. According to the state’s reporting website, officials at Lynchburg Nursing Center have not reported a new COVID-19 case since January 26 – more than 24 days ago.

If you have questions about potential visitation at Lynchburg Nursing Center, call them at 931-759-6000. •

{The Lynchburg Times is an independently owned and operated newspaper in Lynchburg, Tennessee. We cover Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

Raiderettes fall in district semifinals

By Jeff Neal | Lynchburg Times Contributing Writer

EAGLEVILLE — The Moore County Raiderettes found life on the road tough as they dropped a 43-30 decision to Eagleville in the district tourney semifinals Tuesday night.

“The more aggressive team that gets to the free throw line usually wins the game. They are a good team. We were frustrated because we did not shoot well,” Moore County Head Coach Herb Horton said.

The Eagleville’s 2-3 zone defense affected Moore County early. They went over six minutes before finally getting on the board. The difference maker was Eagleville freshman post player Cadence Chapman. She rebounded the ball, altered and blocked shots, and scored four points as well as managing several rebounds against Chloe Brazier down low.

Eagleville built up a 20-11 halftime lead as foul problems became an issue for the Raiderettes. Charlotte Ray and Maecy Fletcher each picked up a pair of fouls in the first quarter. In the ball game, refs called 37 total fouls and 23 were whistled against Moore County. Eagleville had 32 free throw attempts to the Raiderettes 10. Eagleville only outscored Moore County by 10, 15-5 at the stripe.

In the second half, Eagleville went over six minutes without a point and the Raiderettes responded by cutting the lead to 26-21. It was the closest they would come. The Eagles scored nine straight points going up by 14 at 35-21. Late in the game, Ray eventually fouled out and several players continued to play with three or four fouls.

Robin Smedley led the Raiderettes with 7 points. Charlotte Ray and Olivia Richards followed with 6 each. Erica Clifton managed 4 points. Madison Floyd scored 3 points. Chloe Brazier and Jayden Lee swished a basket each. Haylee Ferguson led the Eagles with 11 points.

The Raiderettes play Fayetteville City at home on Wednesday, February 24 in an attempt to earn the three seed for the upcoming region tournament. Tip off is at 7 p.m. •

{The Lynchburg Times is an independently owned and operated newspaper in Lynchburg, Tennessee. We cover Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

Raiders battle but fall to Eagles 50-54 in District Tournament

Tournament officials named three MCHS Raiders to the All District Team following Tuesday night’s game: Brayden Cashion, Riley Holman, and Andrew Copeland. (Photo Credit: Jeff Reed Photography)

HIGH SCHOOL SPORTS | It was a basketball game that felt a bit like a tennis match with lots of second half lead changes and swinging momentum.

The Raiders battled back from a 14 point third period deficit to get not one but two shots at a tie ballgame with less than a minute to play in Lynchburg. At the final buzzer, they fell to Eagleville 50-54 in the second round of the TSSAA District 8 Tournament. Brayden Cashion was the high scoring Raider with 18 points followed by Will Harder with 12.

The 12-10 Raiders and the 10-13 Eagles split their regular season match ups. The Raiders got the 59-54 win in Rutherford County on January 8 and the Eagles got pay back on January 26 — besting the Raiders in front of the home crowd in Lynchburg 61-50. In tournament action, Cascade and Moore County earned a bye week by coming in first and second in District 8. Eagleville beat Cornersville on February 22 to move on to second round play.

Fast first period and sluggish second

The Raider seemed relaxed and ready to go in warm ups and brought that same energy into the first period. They outscored the Eagles 13-6 in the first stanza thanks in part to the hot hands of Riley Holman who snagged seven points. Moore County gained the advantage by also playing aggressive defense — keeping the Eagle shooters safely on the perimeter.

The Eagles battled back in the second period. After getting on the board first in the second stanza with an Andrew Copeland jumper, the two District 8 teams traded baskets until the Eagles finally got hot at the three point line swishing one from the outside at 2:59 mark to pull them ahead by one: Raiders 19 – Eagles 20. Thirty second later the Eagles rebounded and threw another three point shot to give them a 19-23 advantage. They roared into half time with the momentum. At the end of the first two periods the score was Raiders 19, Eagles 25.

Riley Holman led the first half Raider scoring with 7 followed by Andrew Copeland with 4. Brayden Cashion and Dylan Scruggs added 3 point each and Colton Bateman scored 2.

Two shots at a time ballgame

The Eagles brought their second period momentum into the second half. They put together a 16 point run while holding Moore County to a single basket. Finally at around the 2:41 mark, Andrew Copeland broke the spell with a jumper in the paint. At the time out, Moore County trailed 23-36. Following the time out, Colton Bateman snagged another two points to get the Raiders back within 10.

The Eagles then found a Raider weakness that they exploited down the stretch as they used the screen to create a wide open lane for easy layups. At the end of the third period, Eagleville managed a 14 point lead and the Raiders trailed 26-40.

As if sensing time and opportunities were running out, the Raiders came back to life in the final stanza. Will Harder swished an impressive four from the three point line including three in a row to get the Raiders back within four. On his third, the Raider home crowd erupted and Moore County called for a quick timeout.

Following the break Brayden Cashion scored a quick two points to pull the Raiders within two, 45-47, with 2:53 left to play.

In the bonus, the Eagles then made four consecutive foul shots to build their cushion to 47-51 before Brayden Cashion drained a three to make it 48-51 with 1:03 left to play. On the next Eagle possession, the Raiders sent them back to the foul line but the Eagle shooter missed both. Cashion then muscled for another two points to get the Raiders within a single point, 50-51.

The hot hands that got them back in the game cooled for the Raiders as the seconds ticked down. With 1.2 seconds remaining, the Eagles went back to the line and made the bucket that put the game out of reach, 50-54.

The Raiders put together 50 points: Cashion, 18; Harder,12; Holman,7; Copeland,6; Bateman,4; and Dylan Scruggs,3. Kaden Snitzer was the top Eagleville scorer with 16 followed by Watson and Shingley with 13 each.

The Raiders will move onto a consolation game with Cascade in Bedford County on Thursday, February 25 to determine who they will play first in the Region 4 Tournament. District 8 leader Cascade lost to Fayetteville 53-61 on Tuesday. Tickets will be available at the Go Fans app or you can watch the Moore County Sports Network’s student broadcasting team on the NFHS Network. Click here for that link. •

{The Lynchburg Times is an independently owned and operated newspaper in Lynchburg, Tennessee. We cover Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

State, South Cumberland State Park seeking public input

South Cumberland State Park in Grundy County is an area gem. Managers of the South Cumberland State Park are seeking public input on a state plan that will outline recreation, parks and conservation priorities for the next 10 years. (Photo Provided)

GRUNDY COUNTY — State parks are important. That became obvious in 2020. Now a Grundy County parks is looking for your feedback on what its priorities should be moving forward. Managers of the South Cumberland State Park, together with the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC), are seeking public input on a state plan that will outline recreation, parks and conservation priorities for the next 10 years.

“Planning is an integral part of what we do, and we want to hear from Tennesseans about their thoughts for parks and conservation long term,” TDEC Commissioner David Salyers said. “While we are working hard on the plan, we need the input of Tennesseans across the state. The people’s feedback and participation are important for us to succeed.”

The plan, formally known as TN 2030: Tennessee State Recreation Plan, will be a roadmap for the future of public recreation in the state. It will address activity in urban and rural neighborhoods, as well as each region in the state.

The plan is in the formative stage, and TDEC officials ask Tennesseans for their opinions on draft themes and priorities already being discussed. The project will include short-term action items, which would be completed within five years, and long-term initiatives for the 10-year period. TDEC is accepting public comment on its initial priorities. Specific questions from an online form ask Tennesseans to name important priorities to focus on and if there are important recreation and conservation priorities not covered in the draft goals listed. The deadline for submissions is 4:30 p.m. on Feb. 25. Input can be provided by clicking here.

Draft initiatives cover advocacy and education; collaboration and partnerships for economic success; conservation and outdoor recreation; and inclusivity, diversity, equity, access, and affordability. The draft initiatives can be found by clicking here.

Each state must prepare a strategy known as the Statewide Comprehensive Outdoor Recreation Plan (SCORP) every five years to remain eligible for dollars from the federal Land and Water Conservation Fund (LWCF) through the U.S. Department of the Interior. The project also includes needs, interests, and priorities for indoor recreation since the state-run Local Parks and Recreation Fund (LPRF) gives grants to cities and counties for indoor and outdoor recreation projects. The 10-year outline will follow and build upon the TN 2020 plan as well as the TN 2020 Update.

More information on the recreation plan can be found by clicking here. •

Moore County coyote sightings on the rise

Parents of small children and small pet owners should be alert to more coyote movement in Moore County during mating season. (File Photo)

OUTDOOR NEWS — If you happen to run across a coyote in the next couple of months, relax … it’s normal for this time of year.

According to the Tennessee Wildlife Resource Agency, coyote mating season happens January through March in southern, middle Tennessee and that means as the weather continues to warm sightings may be on the rise. Typically, coyotes are nocturnal animals but when they breed daytime activity can increase. They can also become more aggressive during breeding season.

Coyotes began showing up in Tennessee in 1960 and their numbers have been growing ever since because of ample food sources as well as habitat, and lack of any natural predators other than humans. It’s perfectly legal for local farmers to kill coyotes to protect their livestock and coyotes can be hunted and trapped year round with no limit in Tennessee.

State wildlife officials say there are some things you can do to avoid an untimely run in with a love struck coyote. Eliminate outdoor water sources that can attract rodents, birds, and other small animals. Also, do not place trash cans out the night before pick up day. This can invite a scavenger. Small pet owners should be especially vigilant. Don’t allow small dogs and cats to run free and don’t leave them unattended outdoors … especially at night.

Local vet Dr. Bryant Morton says the dogs most at risk would be smaller dogs or ones less able to defend themselves like geriatric dogs or very young puppies. He also added that coyotes tend to be more aggressive and problematic when they are in packs as compared to ones hunting by themselves.

If you do run into a coyote, pick up any smaller dogs or children immediately. Make noise and throw things at the coyote in an effort to scare it off. You should never run or turn your back. •

{The Lynchburg Times is an independently owned and operated newspaper that publishes new stories every morning. Covering Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

Raider wrestler Kaden White heads to state finals on Wednesday

MCHS’s Kaden White (right) and Eagleville’s Wyatt McLemore (left) share a friendly wrestling rivalry. They placed first and second at the recent regional tournament and could face each other again at state. (Photo Credit: Kris White)

SPORTS — According to Raider Wrestling Head Coach Kevin Pearson, wrestling is the only sport that humbles you. “Win or lose, you always learn something every match,” he says.

It’s a sentiment that Moore County High School senior Kaden White agrees with: “I would much rather lose against a good kid than wrestle someone I know I’m going to beat. You don’t really learn much from that.”

On Wednesday, February 24, Kaden White hopes to learn what it feels like to be the best 170 pound high school wrestler in the state of Tennessee as he heads to Chattanooga to represent the Raiders in the TSSAA State Wrestling Championship — a historic first for Moore County athletics.

Although it’s a first for MCHS, Kaden is no stranger to the state wrestling championship scene. Last winter as a junior, he placed sixth in the private school division wrestling for Knoxville Catholic High School. As a sophomore, he won the region but failed to place at state.

A local son with some deep athletic roots

Kaden is the son of MCHS Football Head Coach Kris White and Lynchburg Elementary teacher and former MCHS Raiderette Head Coach Holly White. He and his family moved from East Tennessee back to Moore County last fall so that Kris could take over the MCHS football program.

Kaden and his brother, Dawson, both played for the 11-2 Raiders this year. The squad lingered in the AP Top 10 all season, made it back into the Class A State Playoffs, and area coaches named Kaden a Mr. Football semi-finalist. Kaden says his equally athletic brother got him interested in wrestling and pushes him every day to do his best. Dawson, a freshman at MCHS, plays football and basketball for MCHS. Kaden, a senior, plays football, wrestles, and plays baseball.

“We’re very competitive with each other when it comes to sports,” Kaden jokes. “We can’t even play a pick up game of basketball in the driveway anymore because it gets too heated. But we definitely drive each other … but in a good way.”

Coach Pearson hopes Kaden’s success will inspire younger wrestlers

Head Coach Pearson attributes Kaden wrestling success to longevity, work ethic, and being open to feedback.

“He’s very coachable and he understands the sport,” he says. “He’s maybe learned a little from me but he’s learned a lot from a lot of very good wrestling coaches over the years.”

Coach Pearson says he hopes Kaden’s success will encourage even more local students to join the MCHS wrestling squad next year. This year’s high school team boasted 22 wrestlers — 19 boys and three girls. Coach Pearson also launched a elementary school program for LES students in grades 1-6. “I’ve got 20 little kids out there just loving it,” he says.

This means lots of younger eyes will be watching Kaden wrestle on Wednesday. It’s an honor he takes very seriously.

“It’s an amazing feeling,” Kaden says. “I’ve been to a couple of practices at the elementary school and I can feel them watching me.”

Kaden’s dad, Kris, who serves as assistant coach for the MCHS wrestling team says that wrestling attracts kids who are athletic and interested in sports but not necessarily drawn to team sports.

“Everywhere that we’ve been whether it be Oakland or Knoxville Catholic, you have kids show up to wrestle with art backgrounds and band backgrounds who wouldn’t play football or basketball but had success in the wrestling ring,” says Kris. “That’s their way of getting out there and being an athlete.”

The TSSAA Wrestling State Tournament will take place February 24 in Chattanooga. Ticket to go watch Kaden wrestle have already sold out but the match will be broadcast live at TSSAAsports.com or you can watch through the NFHS Network. •

{The Lynchburg Times is the only independently owned and operated newspaper in Lynchburg, Tennessee. We cover Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

Moore citizens 65 and older can now register for COVID vaccine

On Monday, Moore County will move into Phase 1b of Tennessee’s Vaccination Plan, which means that registration for citizens age 65 and older will also open up. (Graphic Provided)

LOCAL NEWS — Moore County has reported only four a new, confirmed COVID-19 case since last Wednesday and our active case count is down to just 12, as of Sunday afternoon. That’s good news for Lynchburg and so is the state’s plan to move Tennessee into the next vaccination phase.

Last week, the Tennessee Department of Health announced that Moore County would advance into age -based phase 65+ and risk-based phase 1b, which includes teachers, child care staff, and those who work in first responder operations centers.

“Tennessee has administered more than one million doses of COVID-19 vaccine so far, and we’ve made substantial progress in protecting our senior citizens who are over age 70 through vaccination,” said Tennessee Health Commissioner Lisa Piercey, MD, MBA, FAAP. “While we remain focused on our seniors, who are the highest-risk population, we’re able to expand vaccine eligibility to these additional groups as our supply continues to grow each week.”

Citizens 65 and older can get vaccinated now

This means that on Monday, February 22 Moore County citizens age 65 and older can book a vaccine appointment online at covid19.tn.gov. The new Tennessee COVID-19 vaccine registration page looks very different from the previous vaccine “priority waiting list” page but it accomplishes the same thing.

“The registration takes a little longer, but it’s not too bad. You basically answer the questions that you would have been asked when you arrived for your vaccine,” Metro Mayor Bonnie Lewis stated on the county’s social media page on Friday. “There are a few health questions and then you choose where you would like get your shot and you pick your time.”

Mayor Lewis says those without Internet at home or who have difficulty navigating the new website can call the Moore County Health Department for assistance at 931-759-4251.

Teacher vaccinations will begin soon

Last Wednesday the state’s revised plan moved teachers and other child care staff up in vaccination priority list. This means that Moore County school system teachers and staff could expect to receive vaccinations soon including all teachers and staff at Lynchburg Elementary, Moore County Middle School, and Moore County High School.

Mayor Lewis said the school system and the local health department will begin working on a plan to make those vaccinations happen but those details are not yet final.

The new phase also includes folks who support Moore County first responders such as Metro dispatchers.

If you would like to keep up with Moore County’s daily COVID-19 case or vaccination numbers visit covid19.tn.gov. If you have questions about those numbers or getting the vaccine, call the local health department at 931-759-4251. •

{The Lynchburg Times is the only independently owned and operated newspaper in Lynchburg, Tennessee. We cover Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

Sheriff Hatfield: Moore secondary roads still dangerous

Daniel Hollow Road near Five Points Road in the Ledford Mill, Motlow College area remains treacherous Thursday morning and should be avoided. (Photo Credit: Chuck Clark)

MOORE COUNTY – Don’t let the fluffy snow fool you. There’s still a layer of black ice under it and local temperatures won’t get much above freezing today.

Metro Moore County Sheriff Tyler Hatfield told The Lynchburg Times Thursday morning that the main roads in Moore County are mostly clear but some patches of ice remain. He also said that all bridges in the county are still frozen and should be avoided.

“The secondary roads are in bad shape,” he said.

Black ice, packed snow, and frozen bridges make up only part of the story. Low hanging branches weighed down with ice and snow still cover many county roads – especially in the Charity, New Herman, Motlow College, and Ledford Mill areas. Local officials say that if you see a posted Road Closed sign, do not attempt to drive around it unless you live in that area.

Metro Moore County deputies responded to multiple distress calls overnight on local backroads from stranded drivers stuck on hills or in ditches. •

{The Lynchburg Times is the only independently owned and operated newspaper in Lynchburg, Tennessee. We cover Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}