Raiders drop two spots, remain in AP Top 10

The Raiders were ranked #7 in this week’s AP High School Football Top 10. {File Photo}

SPORTS | After losing a close one in Lincoln County last Friday to the Fayetteville City Tigers (4-1), the Moore County Raiders (4-1) remain one of the top 10 Class 1A teams in the state, according to the Associated Press (AP). In the new AP Tennessee High School poll released on Monday, Moore County dropped two spots to number seven.

Fayetteville City – who beat the Raiders 28-22 in week five – rose one spot to number five. Fellow Region 5 team the Cornersville Bulldogs (4-1) moved down one spot to number nine. Number one South Pittsburg (5-0) and number two Lake County (2-0) continue to battle out for the top spot.

In Region 5A action, the Raiders (1-1) remained tied with Cornersville (1-1) for the third spot. Fayetteville City leads with a perfect record in region play followed by Richland (1-0). Both Huntland and Mount Pleasant remain winless in region play.

The Raiders play the fourth of four consecutive road games this Friday night in Eaglesville. According to Moore County Athletic Director Josh Deal tickets will be limited to this away game and will be offered to the families of players, managers, and cheerleaders first. All available tickets can be purchased through the MCHS front office. (Updated at 2:30 p.m. on Wednesday: MC’s allotment of tickets is now sold out.) For more information, call 931-759-4231. •

{The Lynchburg Times is the only independently owned and operated newspaper in Lynchburg, Tennessee. We cover Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

Council approves $2.5 million sewer project

Collapsed pipes, blocked sewer lines, sewage back ups, and even a moratorium handed down by the state limiting growth, Metro Utilities seeks to avoid these bad outcomes by moving forward with a $2.5 million sewer system rehab. [File Photo}

LOCAL NEWS | Collapsed pipes, blocked sewer lines, sewage back ups, and even a moratorium handed down by the state limiting growth … these are just a few of the bad things that can happen if Metro Moore County does not address pressing issues in its sewer system. That’s the opinion Metro Utilities Department (MUD) General Manager Russell Sells presented to the Metro Council on Monday as he appeared before the council to request permission to move ahead with a $2,500,000 State Revolving Fund (SRF) Loan to repair the sewer system and restore capacity with an eye towards growth in the county.

Together with S&ME Project Manager Travis Wilson, Sells stated that recent flow studies during both wet and dry conditions revealed multiple root balls, cracks, and other defects that could result in major failures in the future. He also explained the flow monitoring uncovered a massive increase in peak times sewer flow.

Designed and build around 1960, the current system’s built to managed around 300,000 gallons a day. Flow monitoring revealed that during wet weather the system was trying to handle more than 940,000 gallons — a 526 percent increase.

“There’s just no way it can pump that much over a six inch main line,” Sells explained.

According to Sells, if that flow has nowhere to go it can back up into local homes and business, or even overflow through the tops of local manholes.

“The Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) allows us five overflows in a single calendar year and we’ve come right up to the edge of that several times.”

Not only could overflows cause Metro problems with state and federal regulatory agencies but they can also fine the local utility. Instead, MUD would like to rehab and repair the older concrete and clay sewer lines with a $2,500,000 project funded by money already baked into the most recent water and sewer increases and facilitated through the low interest loan.

“We try to think four to five years ahead,” explained Sells.

Wilson added that proactive fix are less costly than emergency repairs. The plan calls to rehab 7,000 – 10,000 of Metro’s 40,000 feet of sewer line.

“Point repairs cost around $10,000 each,” Wilson said. “You can rehab it with lining for around $48 a foot. It’s a very economical repair.”

The Metro Council voted unanimously to move ahead with the project. The resolution will require two more readings and a public hearing. If it receives final approval, MUD anticipate work to begin next spring with an estimated completion date of February 2022.

For questions about the project, contact MUD at 931-759-4297. The Metro Council will meet again on Monday, October 19 at 6:30 p.m. at the Lynchburg Legion Building. •

{The Lynchburg Times is the only independently owned and operated newspaper in Lynchburg, Tennessee. We cover Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

Mayor: Avoiding 2020 Census will cost Moore County dollars

LOCAL NEWS | Funding for Moore County Head Start, paving and repairing local roads, support for the Metro Moore County Volunteer Fire Department … what do each of these things have in common? The federal and state dollars available to support them are determined by Moore County’s latest total population numbers and Moore County’s total population number is based on the most recent census.

The deadline to respond to the 2020 Census is September 30. {Graphic Provided}

That’s why Metro Mayor Bonnie Lewis wants you to know that the deadline to be counted in the 2020 Census is fast approaching. September 30 will be the deadline to submit your 2020 response.

In rural communities like ours, your response is crucial for planning and each person not counted could cost Moore County as much as $20,000 each over the next 10 years, according to Census officials.

“We are one of the smallest counties in the state, yet we have infrastructure needs like one of the top five or six larger counties,” Mayor Lewis says. “Our latest population estimate is over 6,400 people yet we accommodate over 300,000 visitors a year. Getting the census numbers right determines funding to Moore County for the next 10 years. “

Filling out the survey could not be simpler. Simply visit the 2020 Census website and answer less than 10 easy questions.

And remember, by law, your answers on the U.S. Census can never be used against you by any government agency or court. Getting an accurate count of every person living in Moore County is important. Census numbers help determine how billions in federal dollars are spent. They also determine how many seats in Congress the State of Tennessee gets. For more information, visit the U.S. Census website. •

{The Lynchburg Times is the only independently owned and operated newspaper in Lynchburg, Tennessee. We cover Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

The Unexpected Life of Jack Daniel

By Tabitha Evans Moore | Editor & Publisher

Unlike many brands with a larger-than-life namesake, Jack Daniel existed as a real person, one who walked the streets of Lynchburg. {Photo Courtesy of Jack Daniel’s Distillery}

Honeysuckle garland hangs around the sprawling front porch of a brick mansion situated on a bluff overlooking the East Fork of the Mulberry Creek. In the distance, you can see the lights of Lynchburg two miles away. Mercantile stores, a couple of saloons, a flour mill, a barrel factory, a tannery, a tin shop, and three blacksmiths — all thrive inside the Lynchburg city limits thanks, in part, to their business with the distillery.

Horses and carriages line the estate’s drive and a single Oldsmobile shines in the distance. That’s Jack’s car — the only automobile in town. The cool September night air carries the sound of children playing outside and music playing inside.

As the guests arrive, Elizabeth Motlow (Jack’s sister) and her husband, Connor, offer wide smiles and a beverage from a silver tray — a Tansy Julep (Jack’s favorite drink) or a healthy pour of Old No. 7 neat. Lemonade and cookies for the kids sits on a table out front.

Upstairs in the ballroom, a group of local musicians plays in the far left corner as Nearest Green sits nearby clapping, keeping time with the musicians, and encouraging the dancers. Jack intentionally placed his old friend’s table here. Nearest loves the pulse of the music. His sons, Eli and George, sit beside him with grinning bemusement.

It looks like the entire town is here and the walls line with smiling faces. As Jasper Newton — long known as Uncle Jack by this point — enters the room his infectious, larger-than-life presence commands the room.

He only stands five foot two but his signature outfit — a wide-brimmed country squire hat and formal, black, knee-length frock coat make him seem much taller. His bright, almond-shaped eye survey his friends and family and a sincere smile breaks out under the broad, full mustache that cascades over his top lip.

If we could have watched — local beverage in hand — as a Jasper Newton Daniel birthday party unfolded, it might have looked a lot like this.

Unlike many brands based on a personality, Jack Daniel’s Tennessee Whiskey springs from a real person … one who lived and breathed right here in Lynchburg. You’ve stood where he stood. You’ve seen what he saw.

The story Jack Daniel leaving home at a young age, living with Dan Call, meeting and learning whiskey-making from Nearest Green, and eventually launching a whiskey brand that would become world famous are now well known facts. What’s less well known is Jasper Newton or Uncle Jack the man his family and friends knew during his lifetime. To celebrate his birthday month, I decided to examine the unexpected life of Jasper Newton Daniel the man not Jack Daniel the brand.

“You know Jack was an amazing person, and everything we do today really flows out of what Jack was doing back then,” says unofficial Jack Daniel historian Nelson Eddy, of Finn Partners — Jack Daniel’s marketing and communications firm.

Eddy’s marketing presence at the distillery dates back 33 year to the days of tourism trailblazer and legendary storyteller Roger Brashears and Postcards from Lynchburg ad campaign creator, Art Hancock.

“The Motlow family hired Art and I considered him a mentor,” says Eddy. “Over the years, they shared files and information with me and that kind of led to this role.”

When we asked him what most people don’t know or might find surprising about Jasper Newton Daniel’s life, he had plenty to say.

Jack was likely born in 1848 not 1850

Though no one can definitively prove the actual birthday of Jack Daniel, September 1848 is a pretty good guess. It’s a date historians came to through deduction using the U.S. Census from those days and local oral histories as their guide.

“We knew the 1850 date on the Jack Daniel statue at the distillery was wrong based on the correct date of his mother’s death,” Eddy says.

Jack’s mother, Lucinda Cook Daniel died in 1849, not 1847, as it states on her tombstone at the Lynchburg Cemetery, according Nearest Green Distillery founder Fawn Weaver in her recent forward to Ben A. Green’s Jack Daniel’s Legacy.

“In piecing together all available information (including the original handwritten diary of Jack’s sister, Louisa, housed at the Albert Gore Research Center), I was able to determine Jack likely wrote a “9” at the end of his mother’s death year when ordering the gravestone marker and the monument mason mistakenly took the “9” for a “7,” she says.

According to Eddy, no one’s ever discovered Jasper Newton Daniels birth certificate and based on the times, it’s not a given that one existed. Birth certificates weren’t a requirement in the United States until after the turn of the century, and they cost money. With 10 children, Jack’s parents may not have filed one to save money, Eddy says.

“But we know that back then, the Census listed a person’s age as of their last birthday. If the June 1850 U.S. Census lists Jack’s as a one year old in September 1849 then his birth year must have been 1848.”

Jack Daniel and Nearest Green weren’t contemporaries

By now, everyone knows the genesis of Jack Daniel’s Tennessee Whiskey. Jack learned the famous Lincoln County Process from a Black slave on the Dan Call farm by the name of Nathan “Nearest” Green and by all accounts made him the first official Master Distiller when he purchased the Lois still from Call. Around 1884, Jack purchased a piece of property located near Cave Spring Hollow in Lynchburg and soon after, he introduced the world to his Old No. 7 Tennessee Whiskey.

Based on a historical photo from the early days at the Lynchburg distillery, many believe that Jack and Nearest were around the same age but that’s not true. By the time that photo was taken, Nearest had retired from the whiskey making business and returned to live on the Call’s farm.

Based on this historical photo from the early days of Jack Daniel’s Distillery in Lynchburg, many mistake the man seated to Jack’s right (left in the photo) as Nearest Green. According to family members, that’s actually George Green, Nearest’s son. {Historic photo courtesy of Jack Daniel’s Distillery}

“When Jack sets up at the cave spring in Lynchburg, Nearest stays with Dan Call in Lois on the farm,” says Eddy. “Jack then hires Green’s sons, Eli and George, to work at the distillery and we know from conversations with the Green family that that’s George seated to Jack’s right in that photo.”

“Just after the end of the Civil War, Jack’s relationship with the Green family was such that he sat George to his right in that photo, which would have been a position of honor,” Eddy says. “It was unheard of in that time period.”

Jack likely inherited his love of music from Uncle Nearest

Little Jack Daniel likely thought of Nearest Green like a favorite uncle and it’s well documented that Green’s influence on young Jack went well beyond whiskey making.

According to oral histories, Nearest Green played a mean fiddle and Dan Call often hosted dances on the farm with Nearest playing and Dan calling dances to the delight of the guests. It’s a tradition Jack Daniel continued as he became successful.

Jack Daniel’s home burned several years after his death, but in its day it existed as a mansion overlooking a bluff not far from where the Jack Daniel’s Distillery south processing plant sits now. He built a ballroom on the second floor of the house with a Steinway grand piano in the corner and often hosted community dances there, according to Eddy.

This exists as the only known photo of Jack Daniel’s home, which once sat on a bluff overlooking the East Fork of the Mulberry Creek near the old Lynchburg, Fayetteville Turnpike. You can see Jack’s brother-in-law, Connor Motlow, seated on the right side of the porch. The identity of the man holding the Tennessee Walking horse is not known. {Photo Courtesy of Jack Daniel’s Distillery}

“That mutual love of music is probably the reason why Jack Daniel decides to outfit the Mr. Jack Daniel’s Original Silver Cornet Band,” says Eddy.

Jack Daniel loved speed

Both Eddy and Ben Green’s Legacy book paint a picture of a young Jack Daniel with energy to spare and no time to sit by idly.

From oral histories, we know that young Jack Daniel ran instead of walked nearly everywhere he went. He loved speed and he loved horses, of which he owned many. In fact, Jack Daniel mounted on a horse became a familiar sight not only Moore County but also Coffee County, Flat Creek, and beyond.

Whether he was riding alone, in a wagon delivering whiskey, in a buggy behind speedy horse, Jack Daniel was on the move. Horse riding eventually developed into experiencing horse-power as Jack Daniel was rumored to have owned the very first automobile in the county.

“It makes sense,” says Eddy. “He would have been the wealthiest man in the county and he has a love of speed.”

Jack Daniel lived as a true, southern gentleman

According to Eddy, Jasper Newton Daniel lived much like a Gentleman Jack of his time. He loved to joke and had a great sense of humor. He courted (though unsuccessfully) and threw great parties.

“He was a genuinely good guy in an industry filled with unsavory characters,” Weaver states in her Legacy preface.

He also exuded a certain dapper sense of style: formal, black knee-length frock coat, fawn-colored, silk-lined vest, broad tie, trimmed mustache and goatee, topped with a country squire hat. Even if you had not known who he was exactly, he would have stood out in a crowd.

Though he left school early, Jack Daniel received an education thanks to the persistence of Dan Call’s wife, Mary Jane.

Many people think of Jack Daniel as uneducated, but we know that not to be true, says Eddy. He loved to read and cherished his books — writing his name in them several times so that they’d always find their way home.

“One book we know he owned because it exists today with his name written in it is a copy of Ben Hur, a book written by a Lew Wallace a former Union general in 1880,” says Eddy.

Known around town as The Donations Man, Jack Daniel financed many a church project, farm, businesses, and family emergency. He was known to give lavish birthday and wedding presents and often loaned money even though he knew there was little change he’d be repaid. It’s a local legend that Jack Daniel financed every church in Moore County — save the one that refused money from that “whiskey maker.”

“It is said that he would have died a poor man if his nephews, Lem and Tom Motlow, had not helped him conserve some resources,” Green writes in the Legacy book.

In the end, Eddy says Jack Daniel lived more like a Apple’s Steve Jobs than inventor Thomas Edison.

“He didn’t invent whiskey making or the Lincoln County Process,” says Eddy. “Charcoal mellowing was just the ways things were done back then and it was likely brought over from Africa as a slave tradition.”

Eddy says fifteen other people in Moore County were making whiskey at the same time Jack Daniel made whiskey and they all used the Lincoln County Process. Jack Daniel just did it better. He changed out his charcoal vats often resulting in an award-winning product known for its “pureness and exceptional quality.”

It’s the same product (though slightly lower proofed) made the same way that sits on liquor store shelves today. So, as September comes to an end, grab a bottle of the original Old No. 7, pour yourself a generous glass, and a raise a toast to Jasper Newton Daniel — a Lynchburg original. •

{The Lynchburg Times is the only independently owned and operated newspaper in Lynchburg, Tennessee. We cover Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

Rural Roadside Rescue: TDOT presents herbicide plan to Metro Council

Johnsongrass is an invasive species that often blocks visibility where Moore County roads intersect with state highways. {Photo Credit: USDA}

LOCAL NEWS | Drive Highway 55 between Jack Daniel’s Distillery and Moore County High School and you’ll notice a constant down both sides of the road … shoulder high Johnsongrass. Growing unchecked, it can block Moore County driver’s vision as they turn onto local and state roads.

If you drive into Lincoln County, the grass isn’t a menace. What’s the difference? Several years ago, the Metro Council voted to opt out of the state’s roadside herbicide spraying program and mowing is more costly and can’t keep up.

According to TDOT, the state highway department and Metro Highway Department receive numerous complaints from locals each year concerning obstructed views when attempting to turn onto Highway 55, Highway 82 from numerous county roads including Good Branch Road, Cobb Hollow Road, Firetower Road, and the Five Points area near Motlow College.

Keeping the grass in control is an important but costly job. In the most recent year, TDOT spent $26,963 mowing 178.77 acres in Moore County. For comparison, the state agency spent $59,352 mowing 855.98 acres in Lincoln County. That’s a difference of $69 per acre in Lincoln County versus $151 per acre in Moore County, according to TDOT.

The State Highway Department will present a plan to spray Johnsongrass on local roadsides during Monday night’s Metro Council meeting. Two individuals from TDOT, Jarrod Bonar and Lance Roland, will appear to explain the states herbicide program and to ease any concerns about the “all kill” chemicals that have been used in the past.

Specifically, they will address UT Extension’s Larry Moorehead’s previous concerns about Round Up, which caused erosion and drifted into other areas, according to Mayor Bonnie Lewis. TDOT now sprays Out Rider, an herbicide that kills Johnson Grass only as well as a drift control chemical called Sharp Shooter.

Moorehead recently rode Moore County roads with TDOT and local farmer Jody Preston — who works as a Operations Tech for TDOT — to visualize the difference in the mow versus spray methods.

According to Mayor Bonnie Lewis, Moorehead did his own research after the ride along and agrees with the use of Out Rider on local roadsides.

The Metro Council meeting takes place on Monday night at 6:30 p.m. at the Lynchburg Legion Building located just of the Booneville Highway. For a complete agenda, contact Mayor Lewis’s office at 931-759-7076 or read our meeting preview click here. •

{The Lynchburg Times is the only independently owned and operated newspaper in Lynchburg, Tennessee. We cover Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

Johnson Grass control, sewer repairs on Monday’s Metro Council agenda

The Metro Council will meet on Monday, September 21 at 6:30 p.m. at the Lynchburg Legion Building off the Booneville Highway. {Lynchburg Times Graphic}

LOCAL NEWS | The Metro Council will meet in a regular session meeting on Monday, September 21 at 6:30 p.m. Prior to the regular meeting, there will be two public hearings. At 6:20 p.m., input will be welcome on adding a sentence to the Temporary Use Permit. At 6:25 p.m., the Council will hear public input on changing the variance fee from $20 to $50 in Moore County.

In new business, the State Highway Department will present a plan to spray Johnson grass on local roadsides. Two individuals from TDOT, Jarrod Bonar and Lance Roland, will appear before the Metro Council to explain the states herbicide program and to ease any concerns about the “all kill” chemicals that have been used in the past. {To read our complete coverage of this issue, click here.}

Specifically, they will address UT Extension’s Larry Moorehead’s previous concerns about Round Up in previous years, which caused erosion and drifted to adjacent crops. TDOT now sprays Out Rider, an herbicide that kills Johnson Grass only as well as a drift control chemical called Sharp Shooter. Johnson Grass is a safety issue on Moore County Roads because it blocks driver’s vision as they pull onto state highways

The council will also hear a proposal to amend a Metro ordinance for the Metro Utilities Department (MUD).

MUD will also present a proposal to request a State Revolving Fund (SRF) loan to repair the sewer system and restore capacity with an eye toward growth in the county. SRF loans are low-interest loans issued to utilities districts throughout the state with qualifying projects. The $2,500,000 loan will address rainfall overflow issues in the Metro Sewer System, which sometimes cause sewage overflow. Sewage spilling on the ground during any condition is a violation of the US Clean Water Act and are regulated by both the state and federal governments.

All Metro Council meetings are open to the general public and take place at the Lynchburg Legion Building located of Booneville Highway. If you have questions or concerns, contact Metro Mayor Bonnie Lewis’s office at 931-759-7076. •

{The Lynchburg Times is the only independently owned and operated newspaper in Lynchburg, Tennessee. We cover Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

Lynchburg native Roy Clayton Syler dies at 93

Well known, Moore County farmer Roy Clayton Syler died on Thursday, September 17 at the age of 93. Funeral services will be held locally at Jennings-Moore-Cortner Funeral Home on Sunday. {Photo Provided}

A family man, a veteran, a farmer, and a clever Rook player … this is how the family of Roy Clayton Syler would like him remembered. The Moore County native, age 93, died on September 17, 2020, after a short illness, according to family members.

Born on his family farm in the Hurdlow on June 23, 1927, he graduated from Moore County High School in 1947. While enrolled there, he played football under the famous Coach Shirley Majors. At the age of 17, Clayton enlisted in the United States Navy during WWII. After the war ended 18 months later, he returned to Lynchburg and finished high school.

He worked several years in construction, but always wanted to farm. In 1960, Clayton and his wife, Maggie, purchased the family farm and his childhood home in the Hurdlow community. That working farm exists today as the Syler 7 Farm — a Tennessee Century Farm.

Clayton was also a 50 year member of the Lynchburg Masonic Lodge 509 in and a long time member and deacon at Arbor Primitive Baptist Church. In recent years, he and his wife attended Marble Plains Baptist Church.

Clayton loved farming, family, and friends. Even at age 93, Clayton enjoyed getting up to feed calves, or getting on the tractor to work in the hay. If he could find three willing players, a good game of Rook was in order.

Clayton is survived by his wife of 68 years, Maggie Syler as well as his five children, Kerry Syler (Marie) of Lynchburg, Rodney Syler (Lisa) of Franklin, Rickey Syler (Sally) of Lynchburg, Craig Syler (Amy) of Winchester, and Tanya Vann (Matt) of Lynchburg. He is also survived by sister, Faye Moran of Brentwood. In addition, he was blessed with eleven grandchildren: Leanne Davis, Kurt Syler, Matthew Syler, Janna Abele, Britney Anderson, Benjamin Syler, Anna Bracewell, Eason Syler, Christen Herman, Heather Fanning, and Shaynee Syler; and 16 great-grandchildren.

He was preceded in death by his parents, Roy and Annie Syler, as well as his sister Louise Tabor and his brothers, Jake Syler and Leon Syler.

The family will host visitation on Sunday, September 20 from 12-2 p.m. at Jennings-Moore-Cortner Funeral Home in Lynchburg. Funeral Services will follow at 2 p.m. and internment will be at Lynchburg Cemetery with Kurt Syler, Matthew Syler, Benjamin Syler, Eason Syler, Dillon Davis, Clayton Davis, Sean Herman, and Clint Fanning serving as pallbearers. Jennings-Moore-Cortner Funeral Home is located around 181 Majors Boulevard, Lynchburg, TN 37352. For more information, you may reach them at (931)-759-4552. •

{Editor’s Note: The Lynchburg Times publishes obituaries of Moore County residents and individuals whose immediate family live in Moore County at no cost to the family. We consider it a public service important for future genealogical research. Submit your information to editor@lynchburg-times.com.}

Raiders fall to Tigers 28-22

Senior Dylan Scruggs caught a 55-yard clutch pass from Raider QB Kyler Parker on Friday to tie the game with Fayetteville City. {Photo Credit: Riley Corder for the Moore County Sports Network}

LINCOLN COUNTY — Football is a game of timing.

You play four quarters of 12 minutes each. Offenses get 40 seconds to run a play or face a delay of game penalty. There’s snap cadence. Running backs and receivers run precisely timed routes while the quarterback attempts to evade the defense and hit his target.

It’s a game of inches and seconds. One that’s difficult to play (and watch) when the referee crew interrupts play nearly 20 times in just the first half. That’s a stat from the Moore County Raiders Friday night loss to the Fayetteville City Tigers in Lincoln County on Friday by a final score of 28-22.

After a disjointed and uncharacteristically mistake-riddled first half, the Raiders tied the game with a clutch 92 yard drive capped off with a Kyler Parker to Dylan Scruggs 55 yard pass late in the fourth quarter.

Sputtering, flag heavy first half

The first half felt like a slow, sputtering, out of sync affair thanks in part to nearly 20 flags thrown by officials over the course of the first 24 minutes.

Moore County failed to score in the first stanza. The Tigers scored first on a hand off to KJ Jackson on a first and ten at the 38 yard line. They made the two point conversion and led Moore County 8-0 as time expired in the first quarter.

The second quarter ended much like the first with the Tigers scoring as time expired. At the end of the first half, Fayetteville City led the Raiders 16-0.

Half time adjustments

As the winds whipped and the temperature dropped after halftime, Moore County showed signs of life when senior running back Tyler Smith spotted a hole in the Tiger defensive line and muscled his way into the end zone. Parker then connected with Dawson White for the two point conversion to get the Raiders within eight. With 10 minutes to play in the third quarter, Moore County trailed the Tigers 16-8.

Following the Raider score, the Tigers answered with a quick five play series that resulted in six more Fayetteville City points. This time the Raider defensive line held and the two point conversion failed. With a little over six minutes remaining in the third, the Raiders continued to trail Fayetteville City 22-8.

On the next Raider series and behind a offensive line that gave him plenty of time to make plays, Parker spread the ball around with positive plays to Joshua Parks, Kaden White, Tyler Smith, and Dylan Scruggs to get he Raiders to first and goal as time expired in the third. On the first play of the fourth quarter, Parker tucked the ball and ran in for a Moore County touchdown with 11:57 to play. Chase Bradford’s PAT was good to make it 22-14.

After the Raiders tied the score, the Tigers needed a fake punt on fourth and six with 50 seconds remaining to keep their go-ahead drive alive. Fayetteville City then completed a pass to the one yard line to give them first and goal with 19 seconds left on the clock. They scored on the next play, but the two point conversion failed. With 17 second left, the Raiders took over on the 34 yard line. Parker ran for two yards then completed a toss to Joshua Parks for a first down but time expired.

With its first loss under first year head coach Kris White, the Raiders fall to 4-1 overall and 1-1 in Region 5A. Moore County now ranks third in the region behind Richland (2-1, 1-0) and Fayetteville City (4-1, 3-0). The Raiders will travel for the fourth straight week next Friday night to take on non-conference Eagleville (2-3, 1-1).

The game will kick off in Eagleville at 7 p.m. For those who plan to travel, the GPS address is 500 Highway 99, Eagleville, TN 37060. If you can’t travel to the game, it will be broadcast live on Raider Country 105.1 and 95.5 FM, on the NFHS Network, or The Lynchburg Times will post live score updates on our Facebook page. •

The Lynchburg Times is an independently owned and operated newspaper that publishes new stories every morning. Covering Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

5 Things to Do This Weekend

A regional art show and a fall festival in Cowan, a guided day hike at Walls of Jericho, a benefit barn dance in Lynchburg, and live music at Bean’s Creek Winery … yeah there’s a lot to do this weekend from an appropriate social distance. {Photos Provided}

We get it. Everyone grows weary of being stuck inside. As fall approaches, there are lots of outdoor or small venue events happening in southern, middle Tennessee that present an opportunity to safely get out. So mask up, grab the hand sanitizer, stay six feet apart, wash your hands, and enjoy a little socially-distanced fun.

Regional Art Show in Cowan— It’s a real bummer. Due to increasing concerns about COVID-19, the Franklin County Arts Guild made the difficult decision to cancel its annual Arts & Ales fundraisers. No worries though, you can still support local artists with at their Regional Arts Show at the Artisan Depot. The show will run September 17-20 from 12-5 p.m. each day and will feature painting, sculpture, mixed media, photography, jewelry, and more for southern, middle Tennessee artists. For more information, click here.

Fall Heritage Festival in Cowan — Each third weekend in September folks gather in the charming hamlet of Cowan to celebrate life at the foothills of the Cumberland Plateau. It combines the history of the area with live music, and art for a fun kick off to the fall season. This year will feature fireworks, food trucks, art and crafts, arts demonstrations, a composting workshop, live music, and more. Due to COVID-19 restrictions, there won’t be a kid’s zone, beauty pageant, cruise-in, or living history events this year. For more information, vist their website by clicking here.

Hike at Walls of Jericho in Franklin County — Located around 12 miles from Winchester, the Walls of Jericho sits just along the Tennessee Alabama state line. The “walls” refer to the impressive geological feature that forms a large bowl-shaped amphitheater with steep 200-foot sheer rock. Water drains through the wall creating a unique water feature. On Saturday, Alpha Expeditions will lead hikers through this iconic landscape on a day hike begging at 8 a.m. It’s a seven mile hike through some difficult terrain but worth the effort. To reserve your spot, click here.

Barn Dance to Benefit HorsePlay — Looking to a fun, small town night out for a good cause with plenty of social distancing measure baked into the event. Come check out the Swing and Sway for Hors Play Barn Dance in Wiseman Park in Lynchburg on September 19 at 6 p.m. Tullahoma’s South Jackson Street Band will play live music. The event will also feature a live auction, door prize drawing, and concessions. According to event organizers, the dance will practice social distancing protocols and follow CDC guidelines throughout the event. To read out full coverage, click here.

Live Music at Bean’s Creek Winery — Grab your quaranteam and some lawn chairs and enjoy the End of Summer Party at Bean’s Creek Winery in Manchester. Utopia will provide the rump-shaking live music and there will be food trucks. No outside alcohol is allowed but they will service wine slushees and Old She’d beer. The fun starts at 7 p.m. on Saturday. Click here for more details. •

{The Lynchburg Times is an independently owned and operated newspaper that publishes new stories every morning. Covering Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

Unemployment work search requirement resumes

job searching
Tennessee will resume its work search requirement for those receiving unemployment benefits beginning the last week of September. {File Photo}

STATE NEWS | According to the latest numbers available from the Tennessee Department of workforce and development, the unemployment rate in Moore County is 6.4 % – as compared to 9.5% for the state. That’s down from the 7.5% rate from June but up from the 3.9% unemployment rate for the same time period last year.

Unemployed citizens collecting unemployment benefits will need to once again complete weekly work searches beginning Sunday, October 4, according to a state press release.

Claimants who choose to continue receiving unemployment benefits will start work search activities during the week of Sunday, Sept. 27. They will then document those searches during their weekly certification for Sunday, Oct. 4, and each week after that date.

Furloughed or temporarily laid off claimants who currently have a definitive return to work date do not need to complete this requirement. Self employed individuals currently receiving benefits will be required to call on clients, submit bids or proposals, apply for contract or gig work, and / or attend training. Claimants who are out of work due to one of the COVID-19 reasons listed in the CARES Act may be exempt from performing job searches if they self-certify that they are unable to look for work due to one of the designations and are otherwise able and available, according to the state.

For one-on-one assistance, career specialists at Tennessee’s more than 80 American Job Centers can work with job seekers at no cost to provide customized job searches, job fairs, re-employment services, and eligibility assessment (RESEA) appointments, and help them determine if job training assistance is available. Centers are located regionally in Decherd, Fayetteville, Winchester, and Tullahoma. Click here for contact information.

Traditional job search methods also satisfy the requirement to remain eligible to receive benefits. If a claimant fails to complete their work searches, they will be denied benefits for the week they did not meet eligibility requirements. •

{The Lynchburg Times is an independently owned and operated newspaper that publishes new stories every morning. Covering Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}