5 Things to Do This Weekend

A regional art show and a fall festival in Cowan, a guided day hike at Walls of Jericho, a benefit barn dance in Lynchburg, and live music at Bean’s Creek Winery … yeah there’s a lot to do this weekend from an appropriate social distance. {Photos Provided}

We get it. Everyone grows weary of being stuck inside. As fall approaches, there are lots of outdoor or small venue events happening in southern, middle Tennessee that present an opportunity to safely get out. So mask up, grab the hand sanitizer, stay six feet apart, wash your hands, and enjoy a little socially-distanced fun.

Regional Art Show in Cowan— It’s a real bummer. Due to increasing concerns about COVID-19, the Franklin County Arts Guild made the difficult decision to cancel its annual Arts & Ales fundraisers. No worries though, you can still support local artists with at their Regional Arts Show at the Artisan Depot. The show will run September 17-20 from 12-5 p.m. each day and will feature painting, sculpture, mixed media, photography, jewelry, and more for southern, middle Tennessee artists. For more information, click here.

Fall Heritage Festival in Cowan — Each third weekend in September folks gather in the charming hamlet of Cowan to celebrate life at the foothills of the Cumberland Plateau. It combines the history of the area with live music, and art for a fun kick off to the fall season. This year will feature fireworks, food trucks, art and crafts, arts demonstrations, a composting workshop, live music, and more. Due to COVID-19 restrictions, there won’t be a kid’s zone, beauty pageant, cruise-in, or living history events this year. For more information, vist their website by clicking here.

Hike at Walls of Jericho in Franklin County — Located around 12 miles from Winchester, the Walls of Jericho sits just along the Tennessee Alabama state line. The “walls” refer to the impressive geological feature that forms a large bowl-shaped amphitheater with steep 200-foot sheer rock. Water drains through the wall creating a unique water feature. On Saturday, Alpha Expeditions will lead hikers through this iconic landscape on a day hike begging at 8 a.m. It’s a seven mile hike through some difficult terrain but worth the effort. To reserve your spot, click here.

Barn Dance to Benefit HorsePlay — Looking to a fun, small town night out for a good cause with plenty of social distancing measure baked into the event. Come check out the Swing and Sway for Hors Play Barn Dance in Wiseman Park in Lynchburg on September 19 at 6 p.m. Tullahoma’s South Jackson Street Band will play live music. The event will also feature a live auction, door prize drawing, and concessions. According to event organizers, the dance will practice social distancing protocols and follow CDC guidelines throughout the event. To read out full coverage, click here.

Live Music at Bean’s Creek Winery — Grab your quaranteam and some lawn chairs and enjoy the End of Summer Party at Bean’s Creek Winery in Manchester. Utopia will provide the rump-shaking live music and there will be food trucks. No outside alcohol is allowed but they will service wine slushees and Old She’d beer. The fun starts at 7 p.m. on Saturday. Click here for more details. •

{The Lynchburg Times is an independently owned and operated newspaper that publishes new stories every morning. Covering Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

Virtual talent competition seeks video auditions

Country hit maker and Grand Ole Opry member Craig Morgan will share his music industry insights and experiences with the 2020 Path to Fame Virtual Talent Competition grand champion. {Photo Credit: Nate Griffin}

You’ve heard of talent competition shows like The Voice, American Idol, and America’s Got Talent right? What if we told you that the folks at Pigeon Forge did their very own version, Path to Fame, and that auditions will be coming to two towns less than an hour’s drive from Lynchburg?

Path to Fame 2020 will be the third consecutive year for the Tennessee-based talent scout … and this year due to COVID-19, there will be a virtual twist. In previous years, Path To Fame traveled with a team of talent scouts to various markets in the Southeast. To accommodate restrictions and venue closings due to COVID-19, the talent competition has been re-engineered to accommodate video auditions. 

“We know that performers were affected by the economic shutdown and operating restrictions necessary to combat the spread of COVID-19,” said Pigeon Forge Executive Director of Tourism Leon Downey. “Pigeon Forge’s theater community would like to help those performers, along with other talented folks, by bringing the Path To Fame Virtual Talent Competition online for 2020. We hope easy access to the competition will encourage performers to make a video and take advantage of this great career-building opportunity.”    

The grand champion will claim a prize package that includes tools to help launch the winner’s own path to fame, including a virtual career consultation with country star Craig Morgan. 

Anyone over the age of 18 who fits the search criteria can audition but officials have designated four hometown markets for this year’s auditions:  Asheville, North Carolina, Chattanooga, Tennessee, Huntsville, Alabama, and Atlanta, Georgia.

Contestants may showcase their talent in one of four categories: vocalist, instrumentalist, comedian and specialty act. Individuals and groups of five or fewer can may compete. All contestants must register and submit an audition video following the contest rules and regulations to be eligible to win.

Judges will select four finalists to represent each of the hometown markets. The 16 finalists will compete for the grand champion title and the prize package that includes 12 monthly consultations with a Nashville-based talent executive and a virtual meeting with Broken Bow Records country music star Craig Morgan. 

Morgan possess strong ties to Pigeon Forge. The Tennessee native and Grand Old Opry member served as master of ceremonies at the award-winning Country Tonite show before finding success with country hits like That’s What I Love About Sunday, Almost Home, and Redneck Yacht Club. Morgan will share his music industry insights and experiences with the 2020 Path to Fame Virtual Talent Competition grand champion.


“We’re thrilled to work with Craig Morgan this year in part because he also began his own ‘path to fame’ in Pigeon Forge,” said Downey added. “Given the success of Path to Fame Talent Competition over the past two years, we’re eager to discover more talent this year, and we hope the virtual nature of this year’s contest will encourage even more people to audition.”

The grand champion prize package is comprised of career-building tools, including a one-year mentorship with Nashville-based talent executive John Alexander who discovered Kelsea Ballerini and spent more than a decade at Great American Country television network. Alexander will assist in establishing consultations and industry meetings for the grand champion. Additionally, the winner will perform in Pigeon Forge during a complimentary return trip and receive assets and experiences to advance his or her career. 

Pigeon Forge helped launch the careers of Janelle Arthur, Carly Pearce, and Mandy Barnett. For more information and details to enter are available PFFame.com. •

{The Lynchburg Times is an independently owned and operated newspaper that publishes new stories every morning. Covering Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

5 Things to Do This Weekend

A hike past Adams Falls, an art show on the picturesque Monte Sano Mountain, and a whiskey tasting at a charming Winchester distillery … yeah there are lot of safe, small venue, socially distanced things to do this weekend. {File Photos}

We get it. Everyone grows weary of being stuck inside. As fall approaches, there are lots of outdoor or small venue events happening in southern, middle Tennessee that present an opportunity to safely get out and explore. So mask up, grab the hand sanitizer, stay six feet apart, wash your hands, and enjoy a little socially-distanced fun.

Hike in Tullahoma — Summer is winding down and with the first day of fall right around the corner, locals better grab all those opportunities to explore outside. On Sunday, you can explore the Short Springs, Adam Falls area with Tennessee State Naturalist Randy Hedgepath. The guided 2.5 mile hike will begin and end at the parking lot on Short Springs Road. Hikers will enjoy the moderate Adam’s Falls Trail past Machine Falls while enjoying gorgeous flora and fauna of the South Cumberland along the way. This hike will be limited to 12 people and you can sign up by calling 931-455-1121. Masks are recommended. For more information, click here.

Antique Tractor Show in Eagleville — If you are heading to the Moore County versus Forrest game on Friday anyways and you happen to have a little man who is all about tractors, leave a little early and stop by the Pioneer Days Antique Tractor Show on the way. Hosted by the Tennessee Valley Pioneer Power Association, and features lots of makes and models of antique tractors, trucks, cars, lawn tractors, and other gas powered engines. The free event takes place on Friday and Saturday. For more information, click here.

Art Show in Huntsville — It’s been an end of summer tradition on Monte Sano Mountain for two decades, and it will happen in 2020 with a few social distancing measure in place to keep everyone safe. The Monte Sano Art Festival kicks off on Saturday at 9 a.m. and will feature over 100 local and regional artists as well as area food trucks. Attendees must wear a mask. For more information, click here.

Whiskey Tasting in Winchester — There’s a charming little distillery located right off the historic Winchester Square call Branchwater. Master Distiller Bud Kelley makes some fabulous (and potent) southern, middle moonshine there. On Thursday, they’ll host a Ladies Night. Local gals are invited to come from 3-7 p.m. and taste some of what they have to offer including their new frozen drinks. For more information, click here.

Food Trucks at Beans Creek Winery — A local winery is great. A local winery with a food truck is outstanding. On Saturday Mark’s Specialty Seafood will return to Bean’s Creek Winery in Manchester for both lunch and dinner. Enjoy a refreshing wine slushy as well as seafood favorites like fried scallops, conch fritters, lobster roll, catfish fingers, and more. For more information, click here.

{The Lynchburg Times is an independently owned and operated newspaper that publishes new stories every morning. Covering Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

Art show explores evolution of local female creators

Women artist from around southern, middle Tennessee collaborated for a show that is as relevant today as it was 10 years ago. {Graphic Provided}

TULLAHOMA — 2020 has been … well normal-shattering. Working from home, remote learning, social distancing … for women, it can sometimes feel like being pecked to death by a thousand ducks.

For women artists, the ever-evolving COVID lifestyle can be disruptive to the creative life, so can the simple act of growing older. To recognize and celebrate this truth, a group of women artist will present “Out of the Kitchen, Out of the Box: Reflections of a Decade” beginning September 5 at the Tullahoma Arts Center. It a revisit of show many participated in 10 years ago.

It’s the first gallery show for TAC since it’s COVID shutdown and the exhibit will display through September. TAC officially re-opened on September 1.

The show’s meant to explore the art of women “trying to reclaim themselves as artists, after feeling like the responsibilities of life” had pushed their God-given talents to the wayside. It features works by Karen Ingle, Jennie Roles-Walter, Kathy Mullins, Carol Ann Stephens, Jennie Couch, and Sharon Prosser.

These women hale from throughout southern middle Tennessee. Ingle lives in Winchester. Roles-Walter resides in Fayetteville. Mullins and Prosser live in Tullahoma. Stephens lives in Estill Springs.

These six women agreed to throw caution to the wind and paint uninhibited, unaltered views from their lives. Many explored themes like cancer, motherhood, mentors, body image, as well as painting pieces meant to honor their fellow favorite female artists.

The original show travelled the country showing in several galleries including the National Women’s Artist Association gallery in New York City. This second iteration, “Reflections of a Decade” explores how the women have evolved over the past 10 years. It will include both their original pieces and as well as new art created specifically for this revisiting.

The Tullahoma Art Center (TAC) will host Reflections of a Decade with an opening reception happening Saturday from noon to 2 p.m. Admission will be free for TAC members and $5 for non-members. The art center is located at 401 South Jackson Street.

{The Lynchburg Times is the only independently owned and operated newspaper in Lynchburg. We cover Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

Local book club “heads West” with September pick

The MCPL’s Brown Bag Book Club picked The Outcasts by Kathleen Kent as their September read. {Graphic Provided}

EVENTS — The Moore County Public Library Brown Bag Book Club picked a historical fiction for their September read. The local book club will read The Outcasts by Kathleen Kent this month.

The Dallas-based author has authored three best-selling, historical novels including The Heretic’s Daughter, The Traitor’s Wife, and this novel. She say she was inspired to write by reading a lot of Dickens, Poe and James Michener as a child.

Here’s the summary provided by the publisher:

It’s the 19th century on the Gulf Coast, a time of opportunity and lawlessness. After escaping the Texas brothel where she’d been a virtual prisoner, Lucinda Carter heads for Middle Bayou to meet her lover, who has a plan to make them both rich, chasing rumors of a pirate’s buried treasure.

Meanwhile, Nate Cannon, a young Texas policeman with a pure heart and a strong sense of justice, is on the hunt for a ruthless killer named McGill who has claimed the lives of men, women, and even children across the frontier.

Who – if anyone – will survive when their paths finally cross? As Lucinda and Nate’s stories converge, guns are drawn, debts are paid, and Kathleen Kent delivers an unforgettable portrait of a woman who will stop at nothing to make a new life for herself.

Normally the book club meets each Friday at 1 p.m. but there will be no meeting this Friday, September 11. The group ends and begins a new book on the last Friday of each month, so they will discuss The Outcasts on both September 18 and 25.

For more information, visit the Moore County Public Library’s Facebook page or call them at 931-759-7285. •

{The Lynchburg Times is the only independently owned and operated newspaper in Moore County … covering Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, the Lynchburg Music Fest, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

Even with social distance precautions, charm unchanged at Miss Mary Bobo’s Restaurant

Miss Mary Bobo’s Restaurant sits inside a historic Greek Revival home that originates back to a time before even the distillery existed. It’s dining with a slice of southern culture served with a side of local history.
Miss Mary Bobo’s Restaurant sits inside a historic Greek Revival home that originates back to a time before even the distillery existed. It’s dining with a slice of southern culture served with a side of local history. {Lynchburg Times Photo}

Written by Tabitha Evans Moore | Editor & Publisher

In ordinary times, lunch at Miss Mary Bobo’s Restaurant in Lynchburg isn’t just a meal … it’s a slice of southern culture served with a side of local history. Diners pass heaping platters of Lynchburg favorites around large tables, family-style, as local hostesses regale with tales about Jack Daniel, the Motlow family, and Miss Mary Bobo herself.

In March, the local restaurant closed it’s doors along with public tours at the distillery and the Lynchburg Hardware and General Store due to the COVID-19 global pandemic. Ever mindful of not only its local but also global interest, Jack Daniel’s parent company, Brown-Forman, decided to shut down the marketing side of the distillery while continuing to make whiskey in the hollow — but with a few extra precautions.

In July, Miss Mary Bobo’s re-opened but with some social distanced changes to make sure everyone – from its local staff to its guest from Lynchburg Tennessee, the U.S., and around world – stayed safe. You’ll get your temperature checked at the door. Masks are available for anyone that doesn’t already have one and hand sanitizer is at the ready. The long, family style tables are gone, replaced by smaller, antique tables and chair. Seating is a bit more limited, so you’ll probably want to make a reservation.

Today things are a little different … but just as charming.

A slice of local history

Miss Mary Bobo’s exists as one part restaurant and one part museum of Jack Daniel’s storied history in the community. Framed copies of Arnold Worldwide’s famous Postcard from Lynchburg ad campaign grace multiple walls along with historic photos. It’s one of the longest-running advertising campaigns in history featuring both local characters like Mayor Bonnie Lewis and famous faces like Frank Sinatra and Queen Victoria.

Even the restaurant itself is a slice of local history, as it existed well before Jack Daniel licensed his now famous distillery in the hollow in 1866. Originally built in 1820 around a natural spring that still exists on the property, the two story Greek Revival building possesses a certain unmistakable charm.

Miss Mary, her husband, and two children bought the home from the Salmon family in early 1900 and turned the unused bedrooms into rooms for rent. One of her most famous (and most frequent) boarders was Tom Motlow, Lem Motlow’s younger brother and the founder of Farmer’s Bank. He boarded at Miss Mary’s for more than 40 years until he died at the age of 96.

Miss Mary continued to host boarders until 1970 and continued to oversee the kitchen right up until her death in June 1983 just one month shy of her 102 birthday. Jack Daniel’s Distillery bought the house soon after and re-opened it as a public restaurant in May 1984.

Southern charm and social distancing

So what’s it’s like to eat at Miss Mary Bobo’s without storytellers at the head of each table. We decided to grab a reader, Jill Estfon, the winner of our Lunch with the Editor contest and find out.

For the time being, guests dine at smaller, more intimate tables spaced further apart. Instead of family-style presentation, one of Miss Mary’s scholarships students serves each table. If you aren’t familiar, the restaurant boasts a long history of supporting Moore County students. Each scholarship student is a MCHS graduate attending Motlow State Community College while Jack Daniel’s provides the work experience, books, and labs fees.

The service is friendly, attentive, and completely unobtrusive. Servers wear masks for guests protection. The tables, each adorned with fresh flowers grown by Miss Mary’s Bobo’s manager Debbie Baxter, still feel like Sunday morning.

During our visit, Jill and I were seated in the far left corner of the Evans Room. It didn’t take us long to strike up a conversation with Chris visiting from Salt Lake City across the room. It seems whether hostesses are seated at the head of the table or not the restaurant still inspires meeting and mingling … even at a distance.

“I love the pace and the ability to just sit and enjoy a meal,” he said.

A taste of Lynchburg

Though the menu changes often, crispy, southern-style fried chicken is often on it. Diners choose from a meat, and two or three sides. All meals come with bread and iced tea. {Photo Credit: Laura Zimbrick for Miss Mary Bobo’s}

Miss Mary’s menu changes frequently and features two meats, five sides to choose from, fresh-baked bread, and iced tea. Dessert is optional. All meals are created by a culinary team headed by Jack Daniel’s great great-grand nephew, Chris Dickey. Entrees include items like Boarding House Meatloaf, Southern Fried Chicken, Chicken Pastry, Fried Catfish, and Country-Style BBQ Ribs. On our visit, Jill enjoyed the meatloaf while I dug into the fried chicken.

“The meatloaf tastes super moist with a tangy, spicy bit of heat,” Jill said.

You can get a taste of our famous local product at the distillery. You can also get a southern-inspired taste at Miss Mary Bobo’s. The Lynchburg Candied Apples made with a touch a Jack Daniel’s Tennessee Whiskey is a must if you want the full Lynchburg experience.

Other sides include seasoned greens, fried okra, broccoli rice casserole, macaroni and cheese, mashed potatoes and, of course, every meal is served with a fresh-baked biscuit or cornbread.

Our Lunch with Editor winner, Jill Estfon, raved about Miss Mary Bobo’s fudge pie recipe. “This is on par with what my grandmother made,” she said. {Lynchburg Times Photo}

For dessert, Jill and I both enjoyed the Fudge Pie topped with homemade whipped cream.

“My grandmother set a high bar,” Jill said. “This fudge pie is on par with what my grandmother, Elizabeth Smith, used to make.”

Other featured desserts include chess, pecan, oatmeal, or buttermilk pies.

Miss Mary Bobo’s Restaurant is located just off the historic Lynchburg Square at 295 Main Street. Seatings are generally available every 15 minutes from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Monday through Saturday but reservations are highly recommended and can be made at 931-759-7394.

They also boast an impressive gift shop perfect for a little early Christmas shopping. For more information, check out their Facebook page or visit the Jack Daniel’s website. •

{The Lynchburg Times is the only independently owned and operated newspaper in Lynchburg. We cover Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

Jack Daniel hosts virtual music festival to benefit musicians affected by COVID-19

Alabama Shakes lead singer Brittany Howard (left), singer, songwiter Nathaniel Rateliff (top right), and California indie band Cold War Kids (bottom right) will headline Jack Daniel’s Distillery virtual music festival this Friday and Saturday to support musicians affected by COVID-19. {Photos Provided}

Our local product and live music have a storied history together. From Frank Sinatra’s professed love of Old No. 7 to the recent release of the limited edition Eric Church Single Barrel Bottle … where you find great music, you’ll usually find a bottle of Jack.

Live musicians like the ones we flock to see on Lower Broadway or at Bonnaroo … well, they are struggling. Festival cancellations and music venue closings have upended their livelihoods.

Enter Jack Daniel’s Distillery … together with Crash the Couch, they are raising funds for the Sweet Relief COVID-19 Musicians Fund. On this coming Friday and Saturday (August 14 and 15), Brittany Howard, Nathaniel Rateliff, and Cold War Kids will headline the two-day, online festival on Jack Daniel’s YouTube channel.

Denver-based singer, songwriter Rateliff and California indie rock band the Cold War Kids will headline Friday night along with opening acts like Tank and the Bangas, Hiss Golden Messenger, the Suffers, and Goldlink. Alabama Shakes lead vocalist Brittany Howard will headline night two along with Black Pumas, Brandy Clark, Houndmouth, Durand Jones, and Yola. All performances will be filmed from the artist’s homes all around the country. There performance will be interspersed with live cocktail demonstrations.

So login, make a donation, and raise a glass. •

{The Lynchburg Times is an independently owned, community newspaper that publishes new stories every morning. Covering Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

4 Things to Do This Weekend

A firefly hike at the botanical gardens, classic 80s flicks at the drive in, a new moon hike to Stone Door, and a blown glass exhibit at Cheekwood … yeah, there’s plenty of (socially distanced) things to do this weekend.

THURSDAY Firefly Garden Hike at Huntsville Botanical Garden: We are all trying to live our best life while socially distancing and outdoor events are sometimes a perfect fit. The Huntsville Botanical Garden offers a great opportunity this Thursday with their Firefly Garden Hike. The South’s most charming insect are most active right before sunset. The hike includes a walk through the garden as you learn about the firefly life cycle. Bring a jar so you can catch and release along the way. The hike starts at 7 p.m. Click here for more details.

THURSDAYGhostbusters, Karate Kid, Empire Strikes Back at the Drive In: Thursday will be the last day to catch a trio of classic 1980’s films back on the big screen. The Montana Drive In will play Ghostbusters (1984, rated PG), Karate Kid (1984, rated PG), and The Empire Strikes Back (1980, rated PG). For full coverage on these films, click here.

SUNDAYNew Moon Hike to Stone Door: Legend holds that 10 foot wide by 100 foot deep crack in the rock formation at South Cumberland State Park was once used by Native Americans as a passage way from the cliff to the gorge below during seasonal migration. The two mile round trip hike also offers scenic overlooks and a one-of-a-kind view of the new moon. Meet at Stone Door Road in Beersheeba Spring to a guided night hike with Ranger Spencer beginning at 8:30 p.m. Click here to register.

ALL WEEKENDChihuly Nights at Cheekwood: Imagine large-scale, blown glass sculptures in a gorgeous outdoor setting. It’s the perfect solution to feeling cooped up during social distancing. Chihuly Nights at Cheekwood will display the sculpture of American glass sculptor Dale Chihuly against the bright, southern night sky. Chihuly Nights happens on Thursday, Friday, Saturday, and Sunday for 5-10 p.m. To learn more, click here.

{The Lynchburg Times is the only independently owned and operated newspaper in Lynchburg. We cover Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

Celebration will move forward despite COVID-19 concerns

The Celebration Board of Directors announced on Wednesday that this year’s event will take place with a few COVID-19 accommodations to keep fans safe. {Photo Credit Shane Shiflet via The Celebration}

SHELBYVILLE — Organizers say they plan to move ahead with the 82nd annual Tennessee Walking Horse National Celebration. Their board of director announced on Wednesday that they were in the process of finalizing plans for this year’s show slated to begin August 26.

Despite their intention to move forward, they will be making some changes to accommodate local, state, and federal COVID-19 guidelines. For example, if they prefer, box seat holders will be allowed to work with Celebration staff to move their seats to a less crowded area of the arena.

“The move will be a one-year temporary move and the customer will not lose the right to the original box they’ve previously had,” they stated. “Also, if the customer moves to a different location they will be refunded the difference in price if the new box is less expensive and charged the difference if the new box is more expensive than their original box.”

The Blue Ribbon Circle Club will continue this year but in a new, outside location in the front lawn of the current Blue Ribbon. Table tops inside the Blue Ribbon Circle Club will be spread out. Food selection may be limited and will no longer be self serve.

Due to COVID-19 guidelines, there will not be a corporate sponsors party this year. There will also not be any Celebration sponsored after-show parties or entertainment including live music.

“The board just didn’t feel comfortable with the current executive orders in place of having that many people in one confined location,” they said.

Individual barns can still have gatherings, food and normal customer entertainment but they won’t be allowed to bring in outside entertainment.

Also this year, organizers will require all entries to stable 48 hours prior to their performance. For more information about this year’s changes, visit The Celebration website bu clicking here. •

{The Lynchburg Times is the only independently owned and operated newspaper in Moore County … covering Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, the Lynchburg Music Fest, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

Rolling Stones concert film plays at the drive in

The U.S. issued an embargo on Cuba on February 7, 1962 prohibiting all exports after Cuba nationalized an American-owned oil refinery without compensation. It’s why Cuban cigars became the holy grail of the aficinado world and why modern day Cuban drivers are still fond of 60’s era vintage American cars.

During his second term, then President Barack Obama re-established diplomatic relations after Cuba agreed to a prisoner exchange. On May 29, 2015 the U.S. State Department rescinded Cuba’s designation as a state sponsor of terrorism.

Less than a year later, on March 25, 2016, the Rolling Stones performed a free, outdoor concert at a sports complex in front of an estimated 500,000 Cubans. It marked the first time a foreign rock band played an open-air concert in Cuba to a crowd that size.

On Friday, July 10 the Montana Drive In will show The Rolling Stones: Havana Moon – the concert film from that performance that explores the first time in their 50 year career that the Rollings Stones played live in Havana, Cuba.

Music as a tool for social change

The concert took place five days after President Obama visited Cuba. It was the first time a sitting president visited the island nation in 88 years — since Calvin Coolidge in 1928. Prior to their performance, The Stones were guests at the British Embassy in Cuba where over 200 people, including many Cuban musicians, attended. Following the concert, The Stones launched  a “musician-to-musician” charity initiative in which musical instruments were donated by major instrument suppliers to Cuban musicians of all genres.

“This was no ordinary concert. People hugged and shared looks of disbelief. Coming at the end of a run of shows in South America and Mexico, last night might have marked at least a temporary pause for the legendary group, but it had all the markings of a new chapter for music in Cuba,” said Rolling Stone author Richard L. Dewey at the time.

The film explores the ways in which music can be used as a tool for social change. It will cost $8 per person (car load prices will not apply to this screening). For more information, visit the Montana Drive In website by clicking here. •

{The Lynchburg Times is the only independently owned and operated newspaper in Moore County … covering Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, the Lynchburg Music Fest, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}