Promise Manor featured on Tennessee Crossroads

Lynchburg’s Igniter Productions shot a music promo at Promise Manor in January. The local historic home and private events venue will be featured on Tennessee Crossroads this week. {Photo Provided}

LOCAL NEWS — If you’ve exhausted your Netflix cue recently, one of Lynchburg’s own will be on the small screen beginning Thursday night.

National Public Television’s Tennessee Crossroads will feature local historic home turned special events venue Promise Manor this week. The episodes will air on Thursday, March 26 at 7 p.m. or Sunday, March 29 at 10 a.m.

The first episode of Tennessee Crossroad aired in 1987. Since then, they’ve been crisscrossing the state highways and back roads highlighting the people, places, food, events, and crafts that make our state unique. In the past, they’ve featured other Lynchburg locales like Barrel House BBQ, the Lynchburg Cake and Candy Company, Miss Mary Bobo’s Restaurant, and others.

Birdie Evans, the mother of Mary Evans Bobo of Miss Mary Bobo’s fame, on the porch at what would become Promise Manor. {Historic Photo}

Promise Manor exists in the historic Green-Evans-Hudgens House on Motlow Barns Road. The NPT crew stopped by to chat with venue owners Dennis and Kayla White last November. The 1850-era home was once the home of Birdie Evans – the mother of Miss Mary Evans Bobo’s for whom Lynchburg’s famous restaurant is named.

The charming locals venue hosts baby showers, bridal showers, weddings, and other private and public special events. It’s built in the Greek Revival style and feature historic murals, and sprawling, landscaped grounds.

To learn more about them, visit their Facebook page or website. If you happen to miss the NPT airing of the episode, you can watch it at the Tennessee Crossroads website. •

{The Lynchburg Times is an independently owned and operated newspaper that publishes new stories every morning. Covering Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

Chinese Festival of Lights at the Nashville Zoo will end Feb. 2

Zooluminations features a 200 foot long Chinese dragon. {Photo Courtesy of Jackie Nelms}

EVENTS | Nashville — Time is running out to see Zooluminations: Chinese Festival of Lights at the Nashville Zoo. It will run through February 2 and features over 500 custom-made silk lanterns spread across 60 acres in every shape, animal form, and holiday theme imaginable.

In November, the Nelms family of Lynchburg including Jackie Tomlin Nelms, her daughters Sarah Nelms and Jillian Bates Rael, son Ryan Bates, and their children all attended the oh-so-bright event.

Zooluminations is the largest lantern show in the U.S. and Chinese artisans spent months creating life-sized zoo animals such as elephants, rhinos, and giraffes along with flower scenes, holiday exhibits, and items related to the Chinese culture.

“My favorite parts were the pottery pieces,” said Nelms. “They were all beautiful and each scene had a description of the theme.”

In addition to the Chinese lanterns, the event offers a zipline, carousel, nightly performance by Chinese acrobats, and artisans displaying handmade items such as stone carvings and fan paintings.

The 63-night event will remain open nightly Thursday through Sunday from 5-9 p.m. through February 2. For more information or to purchase advanced ticket, visit the zoo’s website. •

{The Lynchburg Times is an independently owned and operated newspaper that publishes new stories every morning. Covering Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

New Frist exhibit explores 2010 Nashville Flood

The Cumberland River overflowed its banks in 2010, causing floodwaters to rise around the riverfront area and several blocks of downtown Nashville. May 3, 2010.  {Photo Courtesy of  Larry McCormack for The Tennessean.}

Nashville — Over two days in 2010, record-breaking amounts of rainfall fell across Middle Tennessee. The already swollen Cumberland River eventually crested almost 12 feet above flood stage, while smaller tributaries also flooded. That water poured from its banks into the homes and businesses of downtown Nashville including placed like the iconic Grand Ole Opry, the Opryland Hotel, and the Schermerhorn Symphony Center. Over 25 people died in the region and including 11 in Nashville.

It rattled the lives of untold numbers of people and brought a community together. On January 10, The Frist Museum in Nashville opened The Nashville Flood: Ten Years Later, an exhibit of photographs and oral histories from ten different Nashville neighborhoods including Antioch, Belle Meade, Bellevue, Bordeaux, and others, in addition to downtown. The majority of the items for the exhibit come from the Nashville Public Library and The Tennessean. An interactive monitor also illustrates the long-term impact of the flood by pairing photographs from 2010 with ones from 2020. 

The exhibit will remain on display through May 17 in the Conte Community Arts Gallery. For more information, visit The Frist website. •

{The Lynchburg Times is an independently owned and operated newspaper that publishes new stories every morning. Covering Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

Boro beer park offers free music on Americana Sundays

LIVE MUSIC | Murfreesboro — Did you know that Murfreesboro boasted its own beer park? The unique agritourism spot opened in June of this year and it’s not just your ordinary brewery and taproom. Hop Springs located off John Bragg Highway just outside Murfreesboro combines not one but three onsite brewing projects plus corn hole boards, disc golf, hiking trails, a picnic area, and dog park … all spread across 83-acres in rural Rutherford County.

Every Sunday they offer free, live music during Americana Sundays. There’s an open bluegrass jam from 2 to 3:30 p.m. with the Good Dogs followed by an open blues, rock, and Americana jam session from 3:30 to 6:30 p.m.

They offer a full menu of bar foods like brisket sliders, veggie egg rolls, and smoked wings and of course, a wide selection of craft beer.

The venue features three breweries. The Steel Barrel Brewery offers Tennessee-inspired brews like their Americana Session Ale, Raider IPA, and Crockett Lager. Their Mantra Artisan Ales offers pours like Saffron IPA, Battleground Belgian Wit, and Amour Rouge Flanders-Style Sour Red Ale. Lastly, there’s the Humulus Project, which is a series of bold and experimental IPAs. For a complete beer menu of what’s currently on tap, click here.

Hop Springs is located a 6790 John Bragg Highway just outside the Boro. The venue is both kid and dog friendly. To learn more, visit their website. •

{The Lynchburg Times is an independently owned and operated newspaper that publishes new stories every morning. Covering Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

Event marks the 155th anniversary of the Battle of Franklin

10,000 luminaries will be lit on November 30 to commemorate the fallen at the Battle of Franklin – one of the bloodiest battles of the American Civil War. {Photo Courtesy of Carton}

EVENTS | Franklin — It was the battle that led to the end of the American Civil War. Over 10,000 men – both Confederate and Union – fell in a bloody battle that was larger, longer, and deadlier than Pickett’s Charge at Gettysburg. Fought on November 30, 1864, the battle nearly ended the Army of Tennessee and left six Confederate generals dead on the battlefield. Just four months later, Confederate General Robert E. Lee would surrender to Union General Ulysses S. Grant at the Appomattox Courthouse in Virginia.

On Saturday, November 30, the Carnton History Museum and the Battle of Franklin Trust will host events to commemorate that historic day.

Two early morning battlefield tours will be led by Eric A. Jacobson and Olivia Munsch. The 5 a.m. tour will be a general battlefield tour while the 8 a.m. tour will focus on leadership from both Confederate and Union generals during the battle.

Both Carton and Carter House will be open that day for guided tours from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Select living history re-enactors will be present including Dennis Boggs as Abraham Lincoln and Dr. Naima Johnson-Bush performing Negro spirituals.

At dusk, organizers will light 10,000 luminaries – one for each fallen Confederate or Union soldier who died at the Battle of Franklin.

For more information about the event, visit their FB event page by clicking here. For more information about the Battle of Franklin, visit the American Battlefield Trust website. •

{The Lynchburg Times is an independently owned and operated newspaper that publishes new stories every morning. Covering Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

Fall Events: Three cool things at Cheekwood Harvet

This year, Cheekwood added a second Pumpkin House to it’s Harvest display. {Photo Provided}

EVENTS | Nashville — The temperature may still be in the 90’s but it’s officially fall y’all. You can celebrate all things fall at Cheekwood Harvest running now through October 27. We checked it out, and here are five things you shouldn’t miss if you go:

Over 5,000 mums are scattered throughout the 55-acre estate. {Photo Provided}

1 | The Mums. Cheekwood Harvest boast over 5,000 chrysanthemums in every shade of autumn one can imagine. The property in Belle Meade has them scattered in every direction.

2 | The Scarecrows. This year exhibit are all classis storybook themed. Prior to the opening, groups, classrooms, churches, neighborhoods, and work peers were invited to submit a scarecrow based on a literary character or an author of their choice. The results did not disappoint.

3 | The Pumpkin House and Patch. The folks at Cheekwood constructed, not one, but two, 11-foot-tall Pumpkin House surrounded by pumpkins in dozens of varieties that you can purchase and take home.

It’s also a perfect spot for the fall family photos or just an Instagram selfie. Cheekwood is open Tuesday through Sunday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. For more information, click here. •

{The Lynchburg Times is an independently owned and operated newspaper that publishes new stories every morning. Covering Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}