March 29 Update: Confirmed cases now in Bedford, Coffee, Franklin, and Lincoln counties

On Sunday at 2 p.m. the Tennessee Department of Health reported that the four counties that surround Moore County all now have confirmed COVID-19 cases. Moore County is one of just 21 Tennessee counties to have no confirmed cases.

Today, the state number of confirmed cases jumped by 164 to 1,537 – an 11 percent increase. The state raised the total number of COVID-19 related deaths to seven.

Here’s a summary of the this week’s events:

MONDAY | The state confirms a case in Lincoln County. Franklin County confirmed a case the previous day. The City of Tullahoma issued a Shelter at Home order and declared a state of emergency.

TUESDAY | Tullahoma walks back their Shelter in Place order and lifts their curfew. The number of cases increased by 52 but less than one percent of the state population have been tested. Still no confirmed cases in Moore, Bedford, or Coffee counties.

WEDNESDAY | Wednesday’s cases spiked to 784 and the Tennessee Department of Health also confirmed a case in Bedford County. Three of the four counties surrounding Moore County now have COVID-19 cases.

THURSDAY | State numbers continue to inch near the 1,000 mark while Moore County continues to be one of the few Tennessee counties without a confirmed case.

FRIDAY | COVID-19 numbers in the state broke the 1,000 mark with the total of new cases now at 1,203 according to the Tennessee Department of Health. With 85,356 cases the U.S. becomes the epicenter of the pandemic.

SATURDAY | Tullahoma Mayor Lane Curlee confirms that Coffee County now has its first confirmed case. This means that all four counties surrounding Moore County – Bedford, Coffee, Franklin, and Lincoln – all have confirmed COVID-19 cases.

TVA, DREMC partner to keep the lights on in Moore County

STATE NEWS — The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) and Duck River Electric Membership Corporation (DREMC) are doing their part to make sure the lights stay on.

On Thursday, TVA announced their intention to extend $1 billion of credit support to local power companies, like Duck River, to give utilities more flexibility in working with customers during the COVID-19-related financial crunch. TVA will defer a portion of any power cooperative or local power company’s monthly TVA wholesale power payment throughout the COVID-19 response.

DREMC also confirmed its commitment to the community on March 19 by announcing that it has stopped disconnections for non-payment in response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

“These actions were taken in recognition of the financial hardships some members may face due to the COVID-19 outbreak. We understand electricity is essential for the health and safety of you and your family during these difficult times.” said Duck River Electric Membership Corporation President and CEO Scott Spence.

Moore County residents will continue to receive regular monthly bills and DREMC says that continued payments by those who can pay will be important to keeping future electrics prices low.

“We cannot solve many of today’s national or international problems, but we want to do what we can to help you,” Spence said.

DREMC posted an employee video on their Facebook page on Friday to explain the changes and put customer’s minds at ease. You can view that video by clicking here. Questions? Contact the DREMC Lynchburg office at 931-759-7344. •

{The Lynchburg Times is an independently owned and operated newspaper that publishes new stories every morning. Covering Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

State cash assistance to needy families is live now

STATE NEWS — The program we told you about earlier in the week goes live today.

The Tennessee Department of Human Services now offers monthly cash assistance to Moore County families adversely affected by COVID-19. The program, which is called Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) Emergency Benefits, offers cash assistance from $500 to $1000 per household depending on size. Benefits will be available for up to two months.

To qualify, a family must have children in the household, be at or below the eighty-fifth percentile of the state media income, and be able to show they been impacted by COVID-19. Documentation will include birth certificates, tax returns, school attendance records, or other documentation that verifies that children live in the household.

To apply for the program, click here. •

{The Lynchburg Times is an independently owned and operated newspaper that publishes new stories every morning. Covering Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}