Moore County early voting totals skyrocket

Early Voting in Moore County just started last week and as of the first five days a larger percentage of locals voted early this year than compared to that same point in the 2016 Presidential Election. As of the latest number from the Tennessee Secretary of State, 1,154 locals have voted early so far and 39 have cast absentee ballots for a total of 1,193 votes. In 2016, only 612 local folks voted early through day five. There are an estimate 4,962 registered voters in Moore County.

It’s a trend happening statewide. As of Monday, 909,388 total ballots had been cast in Tennessee. That’s 23 percent of the estimated 3.9 million registered voters in the state.

“Our office and election commissions across Tennessee have been preparing for this election and specifically the new challenges of running a safe election during COVID-19 since March,” said Coordinator of Elections Mark Goins. “It is because of their hard work and diligent planning that we are seeing voters have a smooth voting experience.”

Early voting for the State and Federal General election runs Monday to Saturday until Thursday, Oct. 29. Election Day is Tuesday, Nov. 3. Tennessee voters can find their early voting and Election Day hours, polling locations and more with the GoVoteTN app or online at GoVoteTN.com. The GoVoteTN app is free to download in the App Store or Google Play.

While visiting the polls, Tennesseans are encouraged to wear a face covering and maintaining a six-foot distance from poll officials and other voters. Visit the Secretary of State’s Facebook Page for updates on voting totals. •

{The Lynchburg Times is an independently owned and operated newspaper that publishes new stories every morning. Covering Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

Electoral vote allotments could change if Tennessee’s 2020 Census response is down

Both Tennessee’s electoral votes and congressional delegation numbers are determine by U.S. Census numbers. There’s still time to get your 2020 Census responses in via the web. (File Photo)

The state of Tennessee enjoys 11 electoral votes but that could change if the state’s population isn’t properly counted in the 2020 Census. A state’s electoral vote allotment is determined by the number of representatives and senators in Congress. And Tennessee’s Congressional delegation is based on the state’s population as determined every 10 years by the United States Census. That’s why it’s vitally important to get every Tennessean counted before the Census ends on October 15.

The current administration decided to end the Census early in order to try and get results back before the end of the year. This year’s Census, already upended by the COVID-19 pandemic, will end on October 15. Originally, the officials planned to end the count on October 31.

Under Federal law, your Census responses are considered confidential and cannot be shared with anyone, including any government agency. There is still time to fill out your Census form online and be counted. You can still self-respond to the census online at 2020census.gov, or by phone at 844-330-2020. •

{The Lynchburg Times is the only independently owned and operated newspaper in Lynchburg, Tennessee. We cover Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

Election officials: Request absentee ballots now to avoid issues

Election officials remind local voters that absentee ballots need to be requested by October 27 but sooner is better.
Election officials remind local voters that absentee ballots need to be requested by October 27 but sooner is better. {File Photo}

The sooner the better … that’s the word form local election officials concerning absentee ballots as the November 3 Presidential Election looms.

Due to COVID-19 health concerns, state election officials say they anticipated a higher than usual rate of absentee voting this year. In Tennessee, voters may request an absentee ballot for a myriad of reasons from being over the age of 60 to being a full time student. (Click here for a complete list of absentee voting eligibility categories.)

Tennessee allows absentee voters to request a mail in ballot in as few as seven days before an election but both election officials and postal officials warn that procrastination and absentee voting don’t mix.

All Moore County registered voter who would like to request an absentee ballot from the Moore County Election Commission must send a written request containing the following:

  1. Name of the registered voter
  2. Address of the voter’s residence
  3. Voter’s social security number
  4. Voter’s date of birth
  5. Address to mail the ballot
  6. The election in which the voter wishes to participate. If the election involves a primary, the political party in which the voter wishes to participate.
  7. Reason the voter wishes to vote absentee. If applicable, a copy of the CDL containing the CDL number or the TWIC card must be included in the voter’s request.
  8. Voter’s signature

Or to fill out a Request an Absentee By-Mail Ballot for the November 3, 2020 Election form, click here.

That information or form can be sent back to the Moore County Election Commission offices via U.S. mail at PO Box 8056, Lynchburg, TN 37352 or via fax to 931-759-6394. Tennessee does not provide ballot drop off boxes nor do they allow voters to hand deliver ballots to the local elections office.

If there are questions or problem with the information you submit, a local election official will return the application to you, so you can make corrections and resubmit.

The registration deadline to vote in the Presidential Election is Monday, October 5. Absentee ballots may be requested until October 27. In order to be counted, your ballot must arrive via U.S. mail, FedEx, or UPS at the Moore County Election Commission office no later than the close of polls on Election Day.

Questions? Call the Moore Election Commission at 931-759-4532 or email them at moore.commission@tn.gov. To visit the state’s absentee voting information website, click here. •

{The Lynchburg Times is the only independently owned and operated newspaper in Moore County … covering Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, the Lynchburg Music Fest, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

Bradshaw shocks in Democratic primary

A Memphis environmentalist and single mom defeated a Nashville attorney last night in an upset win that had political tongues wagging on Friday morning.

Five candidates vied for an opportunity to run against the Republican nominee to replace retiring U.S. Senator Lamar Alexander. Marquita Bradshaw won with 117,345 votes in a staggering upset win. She will face off with Bill Hagerty in the November election.

Others vote totals were Gary Davis (30,733), Robin Kimbrough (87,846), James Mackler (78,568) and Mark Pickrell (16,012).

Noelle Bivens and Christopher Hale faced off for an opportunity to run against incumbent Scott DesJarlais for U.S. House of Representatives District 4. Hale got 16,089 (58.9%) of the vote compared to Bivens 11,218 (41.1%). In Moore County, Hale also beat Bivens by a 145 to 74 margin.

Chase Clemons ran unopposed for Tennessee Senate District 14. He will face off with Shane Reeves in the November election. •

{The Lynchburg Times is the only independently owned and operated newspaper in Lynchburg. We cover Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

Hagerty, DesJarlais win Republican primary races

Two State Republican primary elections took place Thursday night: one for U.S. Senate and another for U.S. House of Representatives.

In a primary battle that overtook television and social media with leading candidates Bill Hagerty and Manny Sethi swapping licks to replace retiring Senator Lamar Alexander, Hagerty won the Republican nomination for United States Senate by a wide margin. He earned 330,893 (50.8%) to Dr. Sethi’s 256,732 (39.4 %)

In Moore County, Sethi won with 627 votes to Hagerty’s 600. It was close.

In the U.S. House of Representative District 4, incumbent Scott DesJarlais won. The final state vote totals were Scott DesJarlais (55,178), Doug Meyer (14,173) and Randy Sharp (8,279).

Republican State Senator Shane Reeves and Republican State Representative Iris Rudder both ran unopposed. •

{The Lynchburg Times is the only independently owned and operated newspaper in Lynchburg. We cover Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

Early voting ends Saturday

Early voting in Moore County ends this Saturday, August 1. {File Photo}

MOORE COUNTY — Early voting for the August 6 General Election ends this Saturday, August 1.

The ballot will include a primaries for US Senate, U.S. House of Representatives District 4, Tennessee Senate District 14, and Tennessee House of Representatives District 39 as well as local offices in the County General Election. Those up for re-election this year include Metro Council District 1 and District 3, and District 4, Assessor of Property, Road Superintendent, and Metro School Board District 2, District 4, and District 5. Voters will also choose an Urban Services District representative and decide whether or not Western Division Court of Appeals Judge Carma Dennis McGee should be retained or replaced. To view a sample ballot, click here.

All Moore County early voting takes place at the Moore County Building in the Moore County Elections Administrator Jim Sander’s office. Locals may cast early ballots from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. weekdays or 9 a.m. to noon on Saturday. The County Building is located at 241 Main Street and Administrator Sanders’ office is Suite 201.

If you have question or concerns, contact Sanders at 931-759-4532 or moore.commission@tn.gov. You may also request an absentee ballot at the contact email. •

{The Lynchburg Times is the only independently owned and operated newspaper in Lynchburg. We cover Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

Mayor Lewis: Fill out those 2020 Census forms

Moore County currently ranks 11th in the state for self-response in the 2020 Census. Mayor Lewis is encouraging locals to keep up the good work. {File Photo}

LYNCHBURG — Be counted. It’s important. Census numbers determine things like how much federal funding Metro Moore County can qualify for, how our political districts are drawn, and future county planning. That’s why Mayor Bonnie Lewis is encouraging all local to respond to this year’s Census.

On April 2, The Lynchburg Times reported that Moore County ranked number one in state Census responses. You can read that complete coverage by clicking here. As of last week, Moore County’s self-response was 66.1 percent, which is above both the state and national average of 60.6 percent. That places us is eleventh place overall for the state of Tennessee.

Remember, if you do not participate via self-response, a 2020 Census taker will visit your home. By law, they can come back up to six times.

Why do I have to participate? In short, it’s the law. The U.S. Constitution – Article 1, Section 2 to be exact – mandates that we take an accurate counting of all living persons inside the United Stated every 10 years.

Who is counted? The Census counts every person living inside the United Stated regardless of citizenship. The 2020 Census does not include a citizenship question.

What does the Census ask? It’s a short questionnaire with less that 10 questions per person. It includes your first and last name, sex, age, and race. That’s it. Click here to view a sample of the questions. Census takers will never ask about your religion, political affiliations, or income. They will also never ask for your Social Security number of financial information.

Will they keep my information private? Yes … but only for a certain amount of time. All Census answers remain anonymous and they are kept confidential for 72 years. After that, your information is released to the National Archives.

What happens if I don’t answer the form? If you choose not to voluntarily respond online, by phone, or by mail before May 1, then a U.S. Census worker will visit your home to collect the information in person.

What should I do if I suspect the person at my door doesn’t really work for the U.S. Census? All U.S. Census worker wear official identification complete with an ID badge number. If you suspect the person, get their badge number and call the U.S. Census Regional Office to verify them. Tennessee is located in the Philadelphia Regional office along with Delaware, District of Columbia, Kentucky, Maryland, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Virginia, West Virginia. You can reach them at 800.262.4236 or via email at Philadelphia.Regional.Office@census.gov.

And remember, by law, your answers on the U.S. Census can never be used against you by any government agency or court. Getting an accurate count of every person living in Moore County is important. Census numbers help determine how billions in federal dollars are spent. They also determine how many seats in Congress the State of Tennessee gets. For more information, visit the U.S. Census website. •

{The Lynchburg Times is the only independently owned and operated newspaper in Moore County … covering Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

Cauble announces bid for Metro Road Superintendent

Shannon Cauble (center) recently announced her intention to run for Metro Roads Superintendent in the August general election. {Photo Provided}

LYNCHBURG — Moore County native Shannon Cauble recently announced her intention to run for Metro Roads Superintendent in the August 6 General Election.

According to a press release, Cauble is a lifetime resident of Lynchburg who graduated from Moore County High School before attending Motlow State Community College and then Middle Tennessee State University where she earned a BS in Soil Science with a minor in Mathematics.

She lives in Moore County with her husband, Keith Cauble, and daughter, Samantha.

Since 2008, Cauble has served as Assistant Metro Roads Superintendent under Milton Ferrell where her duties included purchasing, budgeting, and supervision of major projects while working closely with local, state, and federal governments. Cauble says during her time as Assistant Superintendent she’s earned various she’s earned various certifications, including recently completing the program to receive the Certified County Financial Officer certification from the State of Tennessee.

“I am looking forward to using my education, experience, and integrity to become your Metro Superintendent of Roads,” she said in a public statement. “I love my family, friends and my community and I am committed to the constant improvement of our county’s road system.”

According to local elections officials, Cauble will run unopposed for the office. The voter registration deadline is Tuesday, July 7 and early voting will begin on Tuesday, July 17. For more election information, visit the Tennessee Secretary of State’s Website. •

{The Lynchburg Times is the only independently owned and operated newspaper in Lynchburg. We cover Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

Vann runs for Metro School Board

LOCAL NEWS — Tanya Syler Vann announced today that she intends to run for Metro School Board member from the Fifth District.

Tanya Syler Vann
Tanya Syler Vann

Vann recently retired from the Moore County school system where she worked as Moore County High Assistant Principal for six years. An educator with 28 years experience, she’s also worked in the local school system as an elementary school teacher, as well as in the Central Office, working with federal programs, specifically Title 1.

Vann says her wide and varied educational experience will help her make good decisions for the Moore County school system.

“I have found in working with so many areas of education that they are all different. The skill set I needed for each job was very different and what I thought I knew about the job, I quickly learned involved so much more than I had imagined. Each change in job was a learning experience where I did my best to grow and excel. If I am given the privilege to serve as Fifth District school board member, I will bring with me an attitude of learning and understanding. I will work to do what is right for the students and parents of the Fifth District and Moore County Schools.”

Tanya Syler Vann is a Moore County native and graduated from Moore County High School in 1981. She holds a bachelor’s degree in Elementary Education as well as a Masters in Administration and Supervision, both from Middle Tennessee State University.

School Board Members will be voted on in the Thursday, August 6 General Election. The deadline to register to vote is Tuesday, July 7. •

{Editor’s Note: If you intend to run for public office in the August 6 General Election, please forward your press release and photo to editor@lynchburg-times.com and we’ll be happy to announce your candidacy.}