Early voting ends Saturday

Early voting in Moore County ends this Saturday, August 1. {File Photo}

MOORE COUNTY — Early voting for the August 6 General Election ends this Saturday, August 1.

The ballot will include a primaries for US Senate, U.S. House of Representatives District 4, Tennessee Senate District 14, and Tennessee House of Representatives District 39 as well as local offices in the County General Election. Those up for re-election this year include Metro Council District 1 and District 3, and District 4, Assessor of Property, Road Superintendent, and Metro School Board District 2, District 4, and District 5. Voters will also choose an Urban Services District representative and decide whether or not Western Division Court of Appeals Judge Carma Dennis McGee should be retained or replaced. To view a sample ballot, click here.

All Moore County early voting takes place at the Moore County Building in the Moore County Elections Administrator Jim Sander’s office. Locals may cast early ballots from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. weekdays or 9 a.m. to noon on Saturday. The County Building is located at 241 Main Street and Administrator Sanders’ office is Suite 201.

If you have question or concerns, contact Sanders at 931-759-4532 or moore.commission@tn.gov. You may also request an absentee ballot at the contact email. •

{The Lynchburg Times is the only independently owned and operated newspaper in Lynchburg. We cover Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

Mayor Lewis: Fill out those 2020 Census forms

Moore County currently ranks 11th in the state for self-response in the 2020 Census. Mayor Lewis is encouraging locals to keep up the good work. {File Photo}

LYNCHBURG — Be counted. It’s important. Census numbers determine things like how much federal funding Metro Moore County can qualify for, how our political districts are drawn, and future county planning. That’s why Mayor Bonnie Lewis is encouraging all local to respond to this year’s Census.

On April 2, The Lynchburg Times reported that Moore County ranked number one in state Census responses. You can read that complete coverage by clicking here. As of last week, Moore County’s self-response was 66.1 percent, which is above both the state and national average of 60.6 percent. That places us is eleventh place overall for the state of Tennessee.

Remember, if you do not participate via self-response, a 2020 Census taker will visit your home. By law, they can come back up to six times.

Why do I have to participate? In short, it’s the law. The U.S. Constitution – Article 1, Section 2 to be exact – mandates that we take an accurate counting of all living persons inside the United Stated every 10 years.

Who is counted? The Census counts every person living inside the United Stated regardless of citizenship. The 2020 Census does not include a citizenship question.

What does the Census ask? It’s a short questionnaire with less that 10 questions per person. It includes your first and last name, sex, age, and race. That’s it. Click here to view a sample of the questions. Census takers will never ask about your religion, political affiliations, or income. They will also never ask for your Social Security number of financial information.

Will they keep my information private? Yes … but only for a certain amount of time. All Census answers remain anonymous and they are kept confidential for 72 years. After that, your information is released to the National Archives.

What happens if I don’t answer the form? If you choose not to voluntarily respond online, by phone, or by mail before May 1, then a U.S. Census worker will visit your home to collect the information in person.

What should I do if I suspect the person at my door doesn’t really work for the U.S. Census? All U.S. Census worker wear official identification complete with an ID badge number. If you suspect the person, get their badge number and call the U.S. Census Regional Office to verify them. Tennessee is located in the Philadelphia Regional office along with Delaware, District of Columbia, Kentucky, Maryland, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Virginia, West Virginia. You can reach them at 800.262.4236 or via email at Philadelphia.Regional.Office@census.gov.

And remember, by law, your answers on the U.S. Census can never be used against you by any government agency or court. Getting an accurate count of every person living in Moore County is important. Census numbers help determine how billions in federal dollars are spent. They also determine how many seats in Congress the State of Tennessee gets. For more information, visit the U.S. Census website. •

{The Lynchburg Times is the only independently owned and operated newspaper in Moore County … covering Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

Cauble announces bid for Metro Road Superintendent

Shannon Cauble (center) recently announced her intention to run for Metro Roads Superintendent in the August general election. {Photo Provided}

LYNCHBURG — Moore County native Shannon Cauble recently announced her intention to run for Metro Roads Superintendent in the August 6 General Election.

According to a press release, Cauble is a lifetime resident of Lynchburg who graduated from Moore County High School before attending Motlow State Community College and then Middle Tennessee State University where she earned a BS in Soil Science with a minor in Mathematics.

She lives in Moore County with her husband, Keith Cauble, and daughter, Samantha.

Since 2008, Cauble has served as Assistant Metro Roads Superintendent under Milton Ferrell where her duties included purchasing, budgeting, and supervision of major projects while working closely with local, state, and federal governments. Cauble says during her time as Assistant Superintendent she’s earned various she’s earned various certifications, including recently completing the program to receive the Certified County Financial Officer certification from the State of Tennessee.

“I am looking forward to using my education, experience, and integrity to become your Metro Superintendent of Roads,” she said in a public statement. “I love my family, friends and my community and I am committed to the constant improvement of our county’s road system.”

According to local elections officials, Cauble will run unopposed for the office. The voter registration deadline is Tuesday, July 7 and early voting will begin on Tuesday, July 17. For more election information, visit the Tennessee Secretary of State’s Website. •

{The Lynchburg Times is the only independently owned and operated newspaper in Lynchburg. We cover Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

Vann runs for Metro School Board

LOCAL NEWS — Tanya Syler Vann announced today that she intends to run for Metro School Board member from the Fifth District.

Tanya Syler Vann
Tanya Syler Vann

Vann recently retired from the Moore County school system where she worked as Moore County High Assistant Principal for six years. An educator with 28 years experience, she’s also worked in the local school system as an elementary school teacher, as well as in the Central Office, working with federal programs, specifically Title 1.

Vann says her wide and varied educational experience will help her make good decisions for the Moore County school system.

“I have found in working with so many areas of education that they are all different. The skill set I needed for each job was very different and what I thought I knew about the job, I quickly learned involved so much more than I had imagined. Each change in job was a learning experience where I did my best to grow and excel. If I am given the privilege to serve as Fifth District school board member, I will bring with me an attitude of learning and understanding. I will work to do what is right for the students and parents of the Fifth District and Moore County Schools.”

Tanya Syler Vann is a Moore County native and graduated from Moore County High School in 1981. She holds a bachelor’s degree in Elementary Education as well as a Masters in Administration and Supervision, both from Middle Tennessee State University.

School Board Members will be voted on in the Thursday, August 6 General Election. The deadline to register to vote is Tuesday, July 7. •

{Editor’s Note: If you intend to run for public office in the August 6 General Election, please forward your press release and photo to editor@lynchburg-times.com and we’ll be happy to announce your candidacy.}