Farming film highlights the dangers of grain entrapment

The film, Silo, explores the dangers of farming and grain entrapment. It will screen for one day only in Winchester of Saturday. {Art Provided}

WINCHESTER — Farming is hard … and it can be dangerous. A new film, which will play for one night only, explores what happens 50 feet worth of corn turns to quicksand. Silo: Feeding the World Comes at a Cost will screen for one night only, March 7, at the Oldham Theater on the historic Winchester Square beginning at 4 p.m. To watch a trailer of the film, click here.

“Inspired by true events, SILO follows a harrowing day in an American farm town. Disaster strikes when teenager Cody Rose is entrapped in a 50-foot-tall grain bin. When the corn turns to quicksand, family, neighbors and first responders must put aside their differences to rescue Cody from drowning in the crop that has sustained their community for generations,” the film’s website states.

It stars Jim Parrack, who some may remember as Hoyt from the HBO series True Blood.

The Franklin County Young Farmers and Ranchers sponsored the special screening. Filmmakers says they hope the film reflects the “emotional, physical and psychological costs of feeding the world.” It’s the first feature film to examine grain entrapment, which is what happens when a person becomes submerged in grain inside a silo. According to U.S Department of Labor, 26 farmers dies in grain entrapment accidents in 2010. Most of those victims were young farmers.

The screening will be accompanied by a discussion led by the Grain Handling Safety Coalistion to discuss safety-related issues. For more information, visit the Grain Safety website. •

{The Lynchburg Times is the only independently owned and operated newspaper in Moore County … covering Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

A new perspective on Oz will be the March pick of the library book club

Finding Dorothy, a novel by Elizabeth Letts, will be the Moore County Library’s Brown Bag Book Club March pick. {Art Provided}

LOCAL NEWS — It’s a new twist on a well known work of fiction and it’s the March pick for the Moore County Public Library’s Brown Bag Book Club.

 Finding Dorothy, a novel by Elizabeth Letts, tells the story behind The Wonderful Wizard of Oz through the eyes of author L. Frank Baum’s wife, Maud.

Set in 1938 Hollywood, MGM plans to adapt Baum’s work onto the big screen 19 years after his death and 77 year old Maud is determined to find her way onto the set. She’s convinced the producers need her to stay true to the spirit of the book. Why? Because she’s the only person still alive who knows it’s secrets. Once on set, a young Judy Garland reminds Maud of the girl she once knew in South Dakota – a place she and Frank lived that inspired much of the book. As Judy gets doubly pressured by both her ambitious stage mom and the studio, Maud become determine to protect her.

Lett’s deeply researched work transforms a certain period in time into a heart felt page turner.

The Brown Bag Book Club meets every Friday at 1 p.m. at the Moore County Public Library located at 17 Majors Boulevard. They begin and end a new book on the last Friday of each month. For more information, call 931-759-7285. •

{The Lynchburg Times is an independently owned, community newspaper that publishes new stories every morning. Covering Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

Chasing Whiskey: Jack documentary hits big screen

Chasing Whiskey, a documentary about Jack Daniel, will play on the big screen on May 11. {Art Provided}

LOCAL NEWS — Lots of locals are about to become celebrities.

It’s being billed at the “untold story of Jack Daniels” … a new documentary about our local product will hit big screens – including the Regal Cinema in Tullahoma – on May 11 only. It’s a one night event and sure to be a sell out locally. Tickets will be available beginning tomorrow (February 21) at this link.

The documentary will feature country music stars Eric Church and Shooter Jennings as well as notables like author John Grisham, Nancy Sinatra, and actor Tim Matheson as they embark on a 57,000 mile journey across five countries and 17 time zones to examine what makes the Jack Daniel’s brand so unique.

“Our film making journey proved that Jack Daniel’s is easily the most iconic whiskey brand in the world. No matter where we went – from Tennessee to Japan to Cuba to the outback of Australia … and even Scotland – we always found someone who had a compelling, personal story to tell about Jack. It’s become part of popular culture everywhere,” said director Greg Olliver.

“With unprecedented access that was given to us by Jack Daniel’s, we uncovered surprising stories that began even before Jack started making his own whiskey. We’re proud to present this insightful, whiskey-soaked adventure that tells the story of Jack that’s been 150+ years in the making.”

The film starts in Lynchburg – where every single drop of Jack Daniel’s is made – and then travels to the outback of Australia, from Beverly Hills to the streets of Havana, Cuba to examine why a world of people identifies withour distinctly American brand.

To view the full trailer, click here.•

{The Lynchburg Times is an independently owned and operated newspaper that publishes new stories every morning. Covering Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

Library book club announces February pick

The Brightest Object in the Universe by Kimi Eisele in the Brown Bag Book Club February Pick. {Art Provided}

LOCAL NEWS — The Brown Bag Book Club, which meets every Friday at the Moore County Public Library, recently announced their February pick, The Lightest Object in The Universe.

It’s a debut novel by Tucson author, Kimi Eisele, set in the dystopian U.S. after a flu outbreak and all the hints of modern society are gone. Government no longer exists. Electricity is gone, and so is the economy. Society remains in a state of collapse.

Here’s the Publisher’s Weekly’s book summary:

“A near-future apocalypse forms the backdrop for an intense, moving romance in Eisele’s smart debut. After the U.S. suffers runaway inflation, natural disasters, a flu epidemic, massive protests, and, finally, a nationwide cyberattack on the power grid, society breaks down. Somewhere on the East Coast, high school principal Carson Waller begins a cross-country trek in hopes of finding Beatrix, a woman he’d fallen in love with over email. Biking, walking, and hitchhiking, he slowly makes his way with the help of strangers who often talk about Jonathan Blue and the Center he leads, where food and amenities are provided for all who come. In alternating chapters, the story explores how Beatrix sows the seeds of a community through trade of goods and services with her West Coast neighbors. With no modern means of communication, Beatrix turns to the airwaves to share information, starting a radio show that becomes the center of a new group—and a beacon for Carson—that offers an alternative to the promises of Blue. Fans of Station Eleven will particularly enjoy this hopeful vision of a postapocalyptic world where there is danger, but also the possibility for ideas to spread, community to blossom, and people to not just survive, but thrive.”

The Brown Bag Book Club meets every Friday at 1 p.m. at the Moore County Public Library located at 17 Majors Boulevard. They begin and end a new book on the last Friday of each month. For more information, call 931-759-7285. •

{The Lynchburg Times is an independently owned, community newspaper that publishes new stories every morning. Covering Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

Library launches Valentine reading contest for kids and teens

LOCAL NEWS — We’ve got some sweet news for kids in Lynchburg. The Moore County Public Library will launch a Valentine’s Day Reading Contest tomorrow (January 24).

For kids aged three to 12, they’ll launch the Love to Read and Create program. Check out any three books and return them by February 12 and you will receive a DIY Valentine Kit. For teenagers, each book you check out between January 24 and February 12 automatically enters you to win a Valentines Day-themed prize that included a stuffed bear and bucket of candy.

The library is located at 17 Majors Boulevard. For questions about the contests, calls 931-759-7285 or check out their Facebook page. •

{The Lynchburg Times is an independently owned and operated newspaper that publishes new stories every morning. Covering Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

Cinema Soda Wars: Local Regal theater switch to Pepsi products

Tullahoma — If you have strong feelings about the Coca-Cola versus Pepsi thing, you might want to brace yourself for a big change coming to the Regal Cinema in Tullahoma. As of Spring 2020, the theater chain will no longer sell Coke products and instead will switch to Pepsi products.

Pepsi produces Sierra Mist, Mountain Dew, Mug Root Beer, in addition to their Cola flavors. Regal currently owns theaters in Nashville and Chalrsville in addition to their Tullhoma theater. •

{The Lynchburg Times is an independently owned and operated newspaper that publishes new stories every morning. Covering Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

16 local authors will attend Local Author Signing Event

REGIONAL NEWS | Manchester — The Coffee County Public Library in Manchester will host 16 area local authors at their annual author signing event, which takes place on Saturday, January 18.

Juvenile fiction and children’s book author Jean Leigh Claudette, romance author Darcy Flynn, Nashville novelist Jeanne Hardt, memoir author Katy O. Ishee, Mystic Series author J.L. Lawrence, children’s book author Rebecca Lusk, Manchester native and American history author Ray McCoy, children, teen, and adult author Amy Parker, fantasy write Honor Raconteur, romantic suspense author Emma Leigh Reed, Christian author H.L. Robertson, children’s author Sheila Robertson, McMinnville author Stan St. Clair, Christian romance and mystery writer Diane Tatum, and southern thriller author Tom Wood will all appear and be available to sign books.

Also appearing will be Elizabeth Taylor, the author or the Voices of Camp Forest. {We reviewed that book in December, click here to read it.}

The event takes place on Saturday, January 18 from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. For more information, check out the event’s Facebook page. The Coffee County Manchester Public Library is located at 1005 Hillsboro Boulevard. •

{The Lynchburg Times is an independently owned and operated newspaper that publishes new stories every morning. Covering Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

Public Library will screen Maleficent: Mistress of Evil on early release Friday

The Moore County Public Library will screen Maleficent: Mistress of Evil on January 17 at 1:15 p.m. Moore County students will have an Early Release Friday that day. {Art Courtesy of Walt Disney}

LOCAL NEWS | Events — All Moore County Schools will get out early on Friday, January 17 for teacher training. Starting at 1 p.m., local kiddos will have a little free time on their hands. Never fear, the Moore County Public Library will be there to save the day with an Early Release Day After School Movie.

Beginning at 1:15 p.m., they’ll screen the recently released Maleficent: Mistress of Evil. It’s a 2019 Walt Disney film starring Angelina Jolie, Elle Fanning, and Michelle Pfeiffer. It’s rated PG and runs about two hours long.

The event will be free to all Moore County students. Children 10 and older may attend without a parent. Parents should plan to accompany younger children. All movie watchers are welcome to bring their own after-school snack.

For more information or questions, contact the Library at 931-759-7285 or for event details check out the event’s Facebook page by clicking here. •

{The Lynchburg Times is an independently owned and operated newspaper that publishes new stories every morning. Covering Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

Historic Lincoln Theatre goes all digital

The Lincoln Theatre on the Fayetteville Square boasts that they’ve now turned all digital. {Photo Courtesy of Cinema Treasures }

REGIONAL NEWS | Fayetteville — It’s a huge move for the 69 year old movie theater. The owners of the historic Lincoln Theatre in Fayetteville recently announced that their two screens are now completely digital with digital surround sound. It also means the local theater will have access to more films, including 3D films.

“There’s something magical about watching a movie at the Lincoln Theatre up on the big screen with friends and friends and a big bag of popcorn and coke,” says Christy Freehauf. She and her husband, Craig, own the local landmark. “We like to say we are in the memory making business.”

This isn’t the first technological innovation for the theater. In 2016, they installed solar panel on the roof and now most movies are powered by solar energy.

The historic theater sits on the Fayetteville Square as a regional treasure. It opened in 1951 as a single screen venue. Their opening film was Air Cadet, a American war drama starring Stephen McNally, Gail Russell, Alex Nicol, and Richard Long. In 1982, the theater underwent an extensive remodel including the conversion to two screens. The main floor seats 335 and the second balcony theater seats 200.

“Our theater is one of only three Art Deco style theatres left in Tennessee that operate as a movie theater,” says Freehauf. “It’s like stepping back in time when you walk through our doors yet our movie experience rivals any new cinema.”

Through Thursday they’ll show Jumanji: Next Level in the upstairs theater and Star Wars: Rise of Skywalker in the ground floor theater. On January 10, Little Women will open there. For more information, check our their website or Facebook page. •

{The Lynchburg Times is an independently owned and operated newspaper that publishes new stories every morning. Covering Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

Book Review: Voices of Camp Forrest in World War II

Voices of Camp Forrest in World War II is available locally at Couch’s in Tullahoma.

By Tabitha Evans Moore, Editor & Publisher

It once included 1,300 buildings, 55 miles of roads, five miles of railroad tracks, and existed as a self-sustaining city of over 70,000 soldiers and another 12,000 civilians. Today, only a few overgrown concrete foundations remain. Originally built in 1926 near Tullahoma as a National Guard Camp, Camp Forrest served as a crucial induction and training site during World War II.

This is the subject of Dr. Elizabeth Taylor’s newest book, Voices of Camp Forrest in World War II (The History Press, $23.99). She interviewed many who lived, worked, trained and grew up there in addition to newspaper articles from the time, and personal diaries to tell the story. The Lynchburg Times recently caught up with the author to discuss her book with deep southern, middle Tennessee roots.

“I am not from Tenneesee but my interest in Camp Forrest evolved after researching the POWs who were housed there in WWII,” Dr. Taylor said.

It’s a little known fact that Camp Forrest served as a prisoner of war facility during WWII, which held prisoners of German, Japanese, and Italian descent. Prisoners worked on local farms, hospitals, and within the community. It was the first civilian internment camp in the nation at the time.

Voices of Camp Forrest in World War II covers topics such as the impact of Pearl Harbor on civilians and military personnel in the Middle Tennessee area, the construction of Camp Forrest, living and working at and around a city sized military installation as well as the effects of housing German prisoners of war throughout the area and the decommissioning of the base after the war.

Barracks at the Camp Forrest {Historic Photo}

In its heyday, Camp Forrest covered nearly 85,000 acres on land that now serves as the footprint of Arnold Engineering Development Complex (AEDC). It housed service clubs, guest houses, a library, post exchanges, a post office, hospital, chapel, a movie theater, and barracks. Major General George Patton once brought his famed 2nd Armored Division from Fort Benning, to practice maneuvers at Camp Forrest. It’s estimated that its mere existence increased the size of Tullahoma by as much as 40 percent.

One of the interesting aspects of the book is the way it explores the many ways Camp Forrest is still with us today.

“Camp Forrest is still very much with us today,” says Dr. Taylor. “When the base was decommissioned, everything was auctioned off … from buildings and autos to cooking supplies and lighting fixtures. Many individuals have told me stories how their family members obtained lumber from the Camp Forrest buildings and used it to build homes and barns. Many of the chapels on base were purchased by local congregations and are still in use today. Much of the 55 miles of roads of Camp Forrest still exist on the old base grounds, but many of the foundations and chimneys are slowly weathering away.”

Dr. Taylor says Tullahoma served as the perfect topographical spot for constructing a military base at that time because the terrain so closely mirrored the European front. It was also helpful that it already hosted a military installation, Camp Peay, the predecessor to Camp Forrest.

But as much positive impact as Camp Forrest brought there were downsides too. Much of the land on which it was built was confiscated by the federal government, leaving many rural farmers displaced. Families who’d farmed the same piece of land for generations suddenly found themselves homeless with little or no compensation.

Then there were the war games.

“The war games simulated the all of the conditions (sights, sounds, and smells) soldiers would face overseas,” said Dr. Taylor. “Tanks did not simply roll down the highways, but rather went through fields and pastures as necessary. It did not matter if a fence was in the way; it become a casualty of the war. In addition to property damage, often times farm animals were affected. For example, hens stopped laying eggs due to the simulated war occurring around them.”

The book mentions many familiar names. It features photos of historic downtown Tullahoma as it existed then and mentions specifically businesses like Clayton’s Shoes and Couch’s Photography, which still exist today. Dr. Taylor also interviewed former Lynchburg resident, Johnny Majors for the book.

“While he did not remember the broadcast about Pearl Harbor, as he was only six years old, Johnny Majors learned about the D-Day invasion listening to the radio with his grandmother, Bessie Bobo,” the book states.

It also talks about Shirley Majors, who worked as a barber in Lynchburg and Tullahoma at the time, playing sports and officiated sporting event at Camp Forrest in his spare time.

After D-Day in June 1944, training drastically reduced at Camp Forrest. After the war was over, the U.S. government declared Camp Forrest surplus property and close it. After the close, instead of returning ownership of land back to local farmers, the site was selected for a new Air Force Base. In 1951, President Truman renamed the area Arnold Engineering Development Center after Air Force General Henry H. “Hap” Arnold.

Voices of Camp Forrest in World War II is available locally at Couch’s in historic downtown Tullahoma as well as online retailers. For more information about Camp Forrest, check out the Camp Forrest website that Dr. Taylor maintains. •

{The Lynchburg Times is an independently owned and operated newspaper that publishes new stories every morning. Covering Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}