Review: Jack Daniel’s Tennessee Cocktail Bitters

Jack Daniel’s adds another offering to it’s gourmet food offerings with its new bitters line. It’s produced in whiskey barrels in small batches. {Photo Provided}

When it come to cocktails, it’s the great equalizer … that taste of something that cuts through the sour or the sweet and gives a drink a complex flavor profile. It traces all the way back to ancient Egypt and now Lynchburg’s making its own on mark on the bitters market with Jack Daniel’s Tennessee Cocktail Bitters.

It’s a partnership with Whiskey Barrel Foods, a U.S. company at the intersection of American whiskey and gourmet foods. They produce small-batch, gourmet items in whiskey barrels. They also own the only U.S. soy sauce microbrewery.

“These aromatic bitters are made specifically to work with the flavors of Jack Daniel’s. Add a few drops to cocktails that call for bitters and even some that don’t,” says Jack Daniel’s U.S. Brand Ambassador ET Tecosky.

Jack Daniel’s Tennessee Cocktail Bitters bring notes of vanilla and Old No. 7 as well as hints of dark berry, maple, and ginger. Adding it to a Manhattan or Old Fashion brings that familiar bittersweet taste with a kick of our local product. We tried it in a glass of Jack Daniel’s Rye on the rocks with a couple of splashes and it really transformed the whiskey.

Jack Daniel Cocktail Bitter are sold at both the Jack Daniel online shop and the Whiskey Barrel Foods website. •

{The Lynchburg Times is the only independently owned and operated newspaper in Lynchburg. We cover Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

Metro Council rejects another attempt to revise barrel tax issue

They are built from scratch from American white oak then individually charred 20-25 seconds to give Jack Daniel’s Tennessee whiskey its distinct color and flavor. Ask any distiller and they’ll tell you, the barrel is a key ingredient in the Lynchburg whiskey-making process. And that barrel was once again the subject at a recent Metro Council meeting.

On Monday, council member Wayne Hawkins asked to be added to the agenda to seek approval for Moore County to initiate legal remedies against the State of Tennessee for the second time in less than six months. The issue? The language of what the local property assessor believe is 80 plus years of unpaid, whiskey barrel tax by Jack Daniel’s Distillery.

But first a little backstory

To understand the events of Monday night, you must first understand it’s genesis. All Metro offices are audited annually through the State Comptroller’s office at no cost to the county. It also pays third party auditors to conduct individual property tax audits … either randomly chosen or picked by the local assessor’s office.

From talking to multiple sources, the barrel tax issue all started with a third party auditor in 2017. That individual was the first to suggest that barrels were subject to property tax. Initially one individual within the State Comptroller’s office agreed by e-mail that the barrels were taxable, but even in that e-mail, the person said he had very limited knowledge of the whiskey and barrel manufacturing process.

Then, the state auditor’s office even went so far as to estimate that Jack Daniel owed Metro Moore $2.7 million in revenue from fiscal year 2017-18 that was “due but not yet collected” and buoyed by the exact number, the local office mailed Jack Daniel’s Distillery a bill … something they’ve done every year since.

Then in 2018, as the State Legislature considered the law that clarified that the barrels are exempt, the Comptroller’s office learned more about those facts and, ultimately, more senior members of the Comptroller’s office withdrew their support of the original auditor and Metro Assessor’s position.

A few weeks later, the Tennessee Legislature overwhelmingly approved a bill with some telling language. It allowed, “Tennessee whiskey barrels to remain exempt from property tax.” HB 2038 passed in the House of Representatives by a 78-12 margin and it’s companion bill SB 2076 passed unanimously in the Senate before heading to Governor Bill Haslam’s desk.

Hawkins makes detailed presentation

Hawkins made several assertion in his Power Point presentation:

Assertion #1: “Up until the early months of Lamar Alexander’s first term, Brown-Forman paid taxes on the barrels they purchased.”

Not true, said Metro Mayor Bonnie Lewis during open discussion.

“Never, ever has Jack Daniel’s paid a barrel tax to Moore County … ever,” she stated emphatically. “The 2018 law was nothing more than a clarification.”

It’s a fact confirmed by the Tennessee Distillers Guild who in 2018 told The Tennessean they polled the group’s membership and none have ever been accessed property tax on whiskey barrels. The Guild represents over 30 distilleries from Memphis to Knoxville and all points along the way including Jack Daniel’s Distillery in Lynchburg, George Dickel Distillery in Tullahoma, Prichard’s Distillery in Kelso, Short Mountain Distillery in Woodbury, Southern Pride Distillery in Fayettevile, and the Nearest Green Distillery in Shelbyville.

Assertion #2: “In concert with Brown-Forman’s management, the Alexander administration reclassified the barrels as manufacturing process equipment (or property), which is not subject to sales tax.

This is where the presentation gets a little muddy. Property tax and sales tax are two different things. The law Hawkins asked his fellow council members to sue the state over references barrels as the subject of property tax not sales tax.

Furthermore, Mayor Lewis confirmed with Jack Daniel’s Distillery that it does not pay sales tax on the barrels because it acquires or uses them under a “sale for resale” certificate, which is what any manufacturer uses when buying a component part of a product it manufactures and resells.

In a written statement to Mayor Lewis, the distillery stated, “In other words, for sales tax purposes, Jack Daniels treats the barrels and their parts as materials that will be manufactured into a final product sold to customer, which is consistent with the fact that the barrels are not subject to property tax because they are manufactured items.”

The exact language of the bill then State Representative David Alexander sponsored (HB 2038) is, “As enacted, specifies that aged whiskey barrels, during the time in which such barrels are owned or leased by a person that produces or manufactures whiskey in those barrels, are considered, and have always been considered, “articles manufactured from the produce of this state, or any other state of the union, in the hands of the manufacturer”, for purposes of exemption from property taxation.

“It’s an industry killer.”

Hawkins based his request, in part, on a 2017 Moore County audit that assumed “all equipment used in the manufacturing process has always been considered as property subject to property taxes in both Tennessee and Kentucky.”

In a 2014 interview with Whiskycast, Kentucky Distillers Association President Eric Gregory stated that, “Kentucky is the only place in the world that actually taxes barrels of aging spirit.”

And even Kentucky changed it’s mind. In April 2014, Kentucky Governor Steve Beshear rescinded its “barrel tax” calling it an “industry killer.”

It’s an opinion Metro Mayor Bonnie Lewis shares.

During Monday night’s meeting she told the council, “If you want to see to the impact of Jack Daniel in little Lynchburg come sit with me all day, every day since March,” she told the council. “It’s a ghost town. The people who have been allowed to open their businesses … it doesn’t matter. Because until Jack Daniel reopens, we’re Mulberry or Petersburg.”

{Editor’s Note: In March, Brown-Forman decided to suspend tours at the Lynchburg distillery in response to COVID-19. It remains shuttered today. Click here for that article.}

She also reminded the council that the “barrel tax” question was added to the ballot in 2012 and Moore County voters did not approve it. She also asserted that the 2012 barrel tax effort played a part in Brown-Forman shifting part of it’s barrel construction into Lincoln County.

“Drive south on Highway 55 and go into Fayetteville 37334, there’s where all your barrels are going. Those warehouses are built daily.”

She continued that moving forward with never-ending efforts to tax Jack Daniel barrels as property would make Fayetteville Mayor Bill Newman and Lincoln County taxpayers “very happy.”

In the end, the majority of council members agreed: John Taylor, Sunny Rae Moorehead, Meghan Bailey, Keith Moses, Houston Lindsay, Amy Cashion, Denning Harder, Arvis Bobo, and Gerald Burnett voted against approving money to pursue the barrel tax issue. Wayne Hawkins, Tommy Brown, and Gordan Millsaps voted in favor. David Boyce and Sandy Thomas were not present at the meeting. Attending remotely, Patrick Maynard lost connection prior to the vote. It failed 9-3.

When we reached out for comment, both of Moore County’s state legislators agreed with the council’s final decision.

“I would not support any any action to impose a barrel tax on our distillers,” Representative Iris Rudder told The Times. “You have to remember that any such tax wouldn’t just affect Jack Daniel. There would be lots of smaller distillers affected as well.”

State Senator Shane Reeves agreed.

“Jack Daniel’s has been making its world-famous whiskey since 1866 in Lynchburg,” he said. “That 150-year partnership, which has brought a lot of jobs, tourism, and revenue into this county, has only been possible because of the intentional effort by Moore County to have a low-tax, pro-business climate. Let’s not break something that has been working for over 15 decades.”

In a bit of serendipity, Jack Daniel mailed its annual Distillery Report to Moore County homes this week. In it, the Distillery reports that it accounts for one-half of all local taxes collected in Metro Moore County. Additionally, Visitors Center bottle sales contributed another $333,000 to Metro’s debt fund. They also employ over 700 Moore County residents, which is equivalent to 50 percent of all private sector jobs.

In addition, the reports states, that Jack Daniel’s “substantial payroll and vendor purchases ripple throughout the region” to the tune of $100 million in employee compensation and another $182 million in compensation throughout the state.

They also make hundreds of charitable donation to groups as close as the Whiskey Runners Car Club and Lynchburg Youth Baseball and national groups like the Alzheimer’s Association and the American Cancer Society. •

{The Lynchburg Times is the only independently owned and operated newspaper in Lynchburg. We cover Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

Music Fest headliner Kip Moore plays Jack Daniel virtual concert on Friday

Kip Moore will play a virtual concert sponsored by Jack Daniel on Friday. He’ll also headline on October 2 at this year’s Lynchburg Music Fest. {Artwork Provided}

Get ready for a preview of this year’s Lynchburg Music Fest on Friday when Nashville country artist Kip Moore performs a virtual concert sponsored by Jack Daniel’s Distillery. Moore will perform songs from his latest album, Wild World.

The creative folks at the distillery launched the multi-genre live stream concert series to raise money for Sweet Relief Musicians COVID-19 Fund. It provides financial assistance to all types of career musicians and music industry workers including immediate assistance with medical expenses, lodging, clothing, food and other vital living expenses to those impacted due to sickness or loss of work. You can make a donation by clicking here.

Moore landed early on the Bro Country scene singing songs about trucks, beers, and small town Friday nights. So, it’s fitting that he’ll headline the most famous small town in America on Friday, October 2 during the second annual Lynchburg Music Fest.

Born in Tifton, Georgia, Moore began his music career during his college days a Wallace State Community College before moving to Nashville in 2004 where he met songwriter and producer Brett James. James – who wrote Carrie Underwood’s famous Jesus Take the Wheel – took an interest in Moore and helped him sign a publishing deal.

Moore’s well know for his chart-topping single, Something Bout a Truck, which hit number one on the Billboard country charts. He followed that song with success like Hey Pretty Girl and Beer Money. Last August, he released an anticipated single, She’s Mine, the first song from a much anticipated upcoming album. 

To watch, tune in to Kip Moore’s Facebook or Instagram page beginning at 6 p.m. (CST). •

{The Lynchburg Times is the only independently owned and operated newspaper in Moore County … covering Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, the Lynchburg Music Fest, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

Essential: Jack Daniel Lead Lexie Amacher

{Editor’s Note: This is the eighth of a multi-part series highlighting all the essential folks in Moore County. Readers nominated each interview subject. To nominate someone, email editor@lynchburg-times.com.}

“Since 1866, we’ve never done anything like this,” says Lexie Amacher of Jack Daniel’s, referring to the pivot from making whiskey to hand sanitizer. {Photo Provided}

“Since 1866, we’ve never done anything like this,” says Jack Daniel’s Lead Lexie Amacher. We caught up with her recently to talk about the transition from Jack employee to essential employee during the COVID-19 pandemic.

She’s one of dozens of employees who usually oversee the day-to-day tasks of making our local product that gets shipped all over the globe from the tiny town of Lynchburg. Today, her mission is much closer to home.

Mid-March, Jack Daniel’s and their parent company, Brown-Forman, decided to shut down public tours here in Lynchburg due to COVID-19. Soon after, the research and development department in Louisville, along with the production staff here in Lynchburg, got busy pivoting from whiskey to another type of alcohol … namely the high-proof variety that gets used to make hand sanitizer.

It’s a quick change that came with the some unique hurdles.

“The very few times we’ve ever tried a new recipe it’s always come with its own obstacles,” she says. “We do a pilot run in the lab, but you never really know what it’s really gonna be like until we do it on a large scale.”

The high-proof ethyl alcohol the distillery now produces gets mixed with glycerin, hydrogen peroxide and other ingredients into a CDC and WHO approved formula meant to be sprayed on surfaces and allowed to air dry. At first, the distillery’s goal was just to produce small batches for employees and local front line workers. It wasn’t long until they realized the demand would quickly outpace that supply. Today, Amacher says the distillery has partnered with two other companies to put out over two million gallons of the stuff a month … and counting.

Amacher says day-to-day the steps in making whiskey and making neutral, distilled alcohol aren’t that different but it’s the social distancing that makes it unique. Like every other essential business, distillery employees clean multiple times a shift, wear face masks, and work further apart than usual. In the end, Amacher says her goal and the goal of every distillery and Brown-Forman employee is to just keep each other safe.

When she’s not busy at the distillery, Amacher says she and her fiancé, Josh Phillips, who works in Single Barrel production, stay busy with projects just like the rest of us. They’ve given the landscaping an upgrade and refinished the kitchen cabinets.

“We’ve also done lots of spring cleaning,” she jokes.

When we asked her what she’s misses most about “normal” life, she’s quick to answer.

“I really just miss people … my friends and my family. Talking on the phone is one thing but not getting to see anyone for long periods is just not what we’re used to … you really take it for granted until it’s gone.” •

{The Lynchburg Times is an independently owned and operated newspaper that publishes new stories every morning. Covering Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

Jack Daniel suspends tours temporarily in response to COVID-19

Brown-Forman will suspend tours at Jack Daniel’s Distillery beginning on Monday, March 16. Miss Mary Bobo’s and the Lynchburg Hardware Store will also close temporarily. {Photo Provided}

LOCAL NEWS — Beginning on Monday, March 16, Brown-Forman will suspend all tours at Jack Daniel’s Distillery as well as close Miss Mary Bobo’s Restaurant and the Lynchburg Hardware & General Store temporarily in response to the conronavirus outbreak in the state. As of Thursday, there were 18 confirmed cases in Tennessee.

The Distillery will continue to operate as normal.

“Our goal is to minimize the risk to employees and guests and help lower the probability of the spread of the virus to our employees, their families and the community,” they said in a press release Thursday afternoon.

“Existing tour reservations that occur before March 16 will be honored. This closure will remain in place until the health emergency subsides. All tickets previously purchased during this time are refundable. We appreciate the understanding of all those who are impacted and encourage all to put their health and safety first.” •

{The Lynchburg Times is the only independently owned and operated newspaper in Moore County … covering Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, the Lynchburg Music Fest, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

Distillery donates $100K to tornado relief

STATE NEWS — The legacy of Lynchburg’s Jack Daniel Distillery and Nashville have always been intertwined. Country music and Tennessee whiskey are our state’s favorite power couple. Eric Church famously pours a shot of Single Barrel for his crew during his concerts. And Nashville artists from Miranda Lambert to George Jones have crooned about our local product.

So, when a devastating tornado swept through downtown Nashville early Tuesday morning it’s didn’t take the Distillery long to step up and lend a hand.

By Tuesday afternoon, Jack Daniel’s Distillery announced via social media that it would donate $100,000 to the Middle Tennessee Emergency Response Fund managed by The Community Foundation of Middle Tennessee. The fund will assist with those affected by the recent tornadoes in Nashville as well as the smaller surrounding towns in Putnam, Wilson, and Benton counties.

“We at Jack Daniel’s are heartbroken over the storms that hit the Nashville area last night,” the brand stated via social media. “In an effort to help, Jack Daniel’s is donating $100,000 to the Middle Tennessee Emergency Response Fund.”

If you’d like to contribute as well, you can do so through The Community Foundation of Middle Tennessee website.

In additional to the Jack Daniel monetary donation, members of the Metro Moore County Volunteer Fire Department were headed to Cookeville on Wednesday to assist with clean up efforts. Also Moore County Schools Coordinated School Health were collecting donations to deliver to people affected in the Cookeville area. •

{The Lynchburg Times is an independently owned and operated newspaper that publishes new stories every morning. Covering Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

Jack Honey makes $15K donation to National Museum of African American Music

Pictured is an artist rendering of the new National Museum of African American Music schedule to open in Nashville this summer. Jack Daniel Distillery recently contributed to the project. {Art Provided}

LOCAL NEWS — Bristol birthed country music. Memphis is the home of the blues. Now Nashville will be home to the only museum dedicated to preserving the legacy and celebrating the unique accomplishments of black musicians and their influences across all genres and folks in Lynchburg can take pride in one of its “benevolent sponsors.”

Jack Daniel’s Honey recently made a $15,000 contribution to the National Museum of African American Music (NMAAM).

Scheduled to open this summer in downtown Nashville, the NMAAM will be a 56,000 square foot facility dedicated to telling the unique story of the influence black musicians have had across all genres of music. To take a virtual tour of the museum, click here.

Exhibits will explore the timeline of African American music; as well as the stories behind black gospel, the Blues, jazz, and R&B. The Message exhibit explores the story of Hip-Hop music in post-Civil Rights Movement America. There’s also an extensive onsite research library and multipurpose rooms that can be used as classrooms or meeting spaces.

According to a press release, the donation is an extension of Jack Daniel’s Distillery’s partnership with Cult Creative’s Art, Beats and Lyrics (AB+L) program. It celebrates artwork from nationally and internationally known visual artists who span a variety of styles and genres. Throughout the years, the “museum meets concert” experience has showcased innovators and creatives from both the art and music worlds.

“For 15 years AB+L has been a platform dedicated to celebrating culture through music and visual art,” says Keenan Harris, Senior Multicultural Marketing Manager, Brown-Forman. “Jack Daniel’s Tennessee Honey is excited to expand the celebration of AB+L to support the anticipated grand opening of the National Museum of African American Music.” •

{The Lynchburg Times is an independently owned and operated newspaper that publishes new stories every morning. Covering Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

Buddy the Beagle gets his own Facebook page

Some folks have a town dog. Lynchburg has it’s own distillery dog and now Buddy the Beagle has his own social media page. {Photo Provided}

LOCAL NEWS — For Jack Daniel’s hardest working canine, life can be exhausting. From sneaking treats from local tour guides to free belly rubs from any of the 300,000 visitors who come through Lynchburg each year … Buddy’s work is rarely done.

Those of you who know and love Buddy the Beagle can now follow him on his very own Facebook page. Click here for a link. The page is run by Jack employee Alison Goodwin Hartung.

On it, you can chronicle his adventures from greeting tourists, taking golf cart rides with tour guides, overseeing the landscaping crew, or taking selfies with locals. He’s also been known to get rides home in the evening from Jack Daniel security. He’s even been known to be featured regularly in this newspaper. Everybody loves Buddy. So go on over and give his page a like. •

{The Lynchburg Times is an independently owned and operated community newspaper that publishes new stories every morning. Covering Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

Jack Daniel gets famous first tonight during Super Bowl

Jack Daniel’s “Our Responsibility” ad marks the first time the distillery’s run an in-game advertising spot during the Super Bowl. {Photo Courtesy of Brown-Forman)

Sunday night’s Super Bowl is full of firsts.

It’s the first time the Kansas City Chief’s and San Francisco 49ers have ever faced off in a Super Bowl. Kyle and Mike Shanahan will become the first father-son duo in NFL history to appear in a Super Bowl as head coaches … the younger with the 49ers and the elder with the Denver Broncos. It also marks the first time in the history of the brand that Jack Daniel will air an in-game Super Bowl commercial.

The spot entitled “Our Responsibilities” features lots of local faces and tells the story of the various “responsibilities” at the distillery from whiskey taster to warehousing to Jack Daniel’s Fire Brigade to tour guide … and even the local dog. To view the 30-second commercial, click here.

It’s a little known fact that the National Football League banned liquor advertising during it’s broadcasts until as recently as 2017. This year’s spots are going for an estimated $5 million per 30-second spot.

It’s a logical fit for our local product as they already supports the NBA, MLB, and NHL with national advertising dollars. Arnold Worldwide created the spot and it’s paired with Uber discount codes on social media and in select bars to encourage “drinking responsibly.” According to officials, the ad will air in nine markets including Nashville, so keep your eyes pealed. Cheers y’all. •

{The Lynchburg Times is an independently owned and operated community newspaper that publishes new stories every morning. Covering Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

Council member asks for legal “blank check” to revisit barrel tax issue

In November 2011, the Metro Council decided by a 10-5 vote. Back then, the Lynchburg Chamber of Commerce unanimously opposed the proposal. In April 2018, the General Assembly decided by a 78-12 vote. But on Monday night, Metro Council member Tommy Brown asked his fellow council members to a approve a legal “blank check” to get clarification on the “constitutionality” of the Moore County Barrel Tax issue.

Brown asked Chairman Denning Harder to add the item into old business just before the January meeting. As such, no information about the issue could be added to the informational packets that each member receives prior to each meeting.

Brown asked for a motion empowering Property Tax Assessor Darrin Harrison to pursue a “administrative or judicial review” of the 2018 decision … using public funds to do so. Brown said he was asking the Council to revisit the long-decided issue due to a new opinion by Murfreesboro Administrative Judge Mark Aaron in September 2019.

“I think we owe it to the the people of this county,” Brown stated.

The Lynchburg Times acquired a copy of that legal opinion. In it, Judge Aaron states that “the administrative judge is earnestly unable to see the assessor’s argument as anything short of a claim that the recent amendment is facially invalid due to constitutional infirmity” … meaning he declines to make a ruling on the constitutional questions surrounding the state legislature’s approved whiskey barrel tax exemption. He further state that he’s “highly skeptical of his authority to usurp the Legislature’s clear directive.”

In Brown’s motion to the Council, he asked that they green light public funds to pursue an administrative or judicial review of the case. He received considerable push back. Mayor Bonnie Lewis cautioned that a legal “blank check” could result in a large, unintended line item.

“I can’t see it costing much,” Brown retorted.

Fellow Metro Council member Amy Cashion stated her unwillingness to vote on Brown’s motion out of the blue. “All of this was decided a long time ago,” she stated. “I’d need to refresh my memory before I felt comfortable voting.”

It’s a sentiment several other members also addressed. Several asked Brown to table his motion until the February meeting to give members time to review the facts … an idea Brown rebuffed.

“It was decided in September,” he replied. “You’ve had time.”

Instead he asked for a roll call vote in the matter. Yes votes were Adams, Millsaps, Brown, and Hawkins. No votes were Moses, Lewis, Burnett, Boyce, Harder, Cashion, Lindsay, Bailey, Moorehead, and Taylor. The motion failed 4-10. Arvis Bobo did not attend the meeting.

Judge Aaron’s appeal ruling took place on September 13, 2019. According to the document, interested parties had 75 days to file any further appeals. That deadline expired in late November.•

{The Lynchburg Times is an independently owned and operated newspaper that publishes new stories every morning. Covering Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}