Partners for Healing wins mental health grant

Partners for Healing Nurse Practitioners Heather McAlister (left) and Faith LeGrone (right) will help more local working uninsured patients receive mental health treatment thanks in part to a grant from the Community Foundation of Middle Tennessee. (Photo Provided)

REGIONAL NEWS — Social isolation due to the global pandemic, the stress of working from home and remote learning, our state’s opioid crisis … it can all feel overwhelming. But thanks to new grant, one local healthcare provider will be able to allocate more resources toward mental health.

The Community Foundation of Middle Tennessee (CFMT) recently awarded Partners for Healing – a non-profit organization serving the working uninsured in Moore, Coffee, and Franklin counties – a $5,000 grant to address mental health issue in this area. According to Partners, the funding will allow them to expand its relationship with Centerstone Mental Health Care and increase the number of mental health appointments made.

“I am so excited to work with Partners for Healing to address the mental health and improve the wellbeing of some of the most vulnerable in our community,” said Partners for Healings Nurse Practitioner Heather McAlister.

Partners was among the 350 nonprofits across 40 Middle Tennessee counties that received their share of over $2.2 million in grants during the 2020 annual grantmaking process. Established in 2001, Partners for Healing serves as a free primary medical clinic for those who live or work in Moore, Franklin and Coffee counties. To qualify for services, applicants must have a total household income of less than 250 percent of the Federal Poverty Guidelines and at least one member of the household must work a minimum of 20 hours each week.

For more information about receiving mental health or other healthcare from Partners for Healing, call them at 931-455-5014 or to learn more visit their website by clicking here. •

{The Lynchburg Times is the only independently owned and operated newspaper in Lynchburg, Tennessee. We cover Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

Moore County citizens can now pre-register for COVID vaccine

According to the state website, there’s no new COVID-19 vaccine headed to Moore County this week but there’s now a state website where citizens can pre-register for the next round. (File Photo)

STATE NEWS — Despite the fact that there are again no additional shipments of COVID-19 vaccine headed to Moore County this week, Metro Mayor Bonnie Lewis says she feels optimistic that that will soon change and that the next round of public vaccinations in Lynchburg will go much more smoothly than the first.

“The Tennessee Department of Health recently launched an online registration portal so that Moore County residents can make appointments to receive the COVID-19 vaccine,” said Mayor Lewis through Metro’s social media page. “We will do what is needed to assist our seniors set appointments.”

You can now pre-register for a vaccination by clicking here.

Vaccine rollout changing constantly

Like any major health initiative that requires federal, state, and local coordination things tend to evolve quickly. Such is the case with the COVID-19 vaccine rollout in Moore County. On December 21, Assistant EMA Director Hunter Case became the first person in Moore County to receive the vaccine. For the next two weeks, local health department officials focused on vaccinating all Moore County 1a1 and 1a2 individuals like high exposure health care workers, first responders, and healthcare workers with direct patient exposure. On January 2, Moore County held it’s first public vaccination date for citizens 75 years of age and older.

It was a frustrating day for both local health care workers and those trying to get the vaccine. Mayor Lewis says local officials learned lessons that day and that future public vaccination dates will be by-appointment, drive thru events held at the new ballpark located along Main Street.

Originally the plan was to move vaccination events to Wiseman Park but after some deliberation, Mayor Lewis and local health care workers decided it would be easier to control the temperature for those administering the vaccine with a tent at the new park rather than an open air pavilion.

“The plan is to have the tent up and ready by the time we get the next shipment of vaccines,” said Mayor Lewis.

As of Monday, there was still no next shipment headed to Moore County, according to the state website. The Vaccine Information Sheet for Monday, January 11 stated that limited vaccine would be available in Bedford County but Coffee, Franklin, and Lincoln counties would also no receive additional vaccines this week. •

{The Lynchburg Times is the only independently owned and operated newspaper in Lynchburg, Tennessee. We cover Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

Citizen vaccinations begin in Moore County

On December 21, local first responder Hunter Case became the first person in Moore County to receive the COVID-19 vaccine. (Photo Provided)

LOCAL NEWS — On December 21, Metro Assistant EMA Director and Critical Care Paramedic Hunter Case became the first person in Moore County to receive the COVID-19 vaccination. Since then, local health department officials have been busy behind the scenes giving the vaccine to high exposure health care workers, residents and staff of Lynchburg Nursing Center, first responders, dental and medical office staff, funeral and mortuary workers, and other state identified tier 1 individuals.

On Saturday, January 2 from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., the Moore County Health Department will be open and offering COVID-19 vaccinations to anyone 75 years of age and older. Vaccinations are free and offered on a first-come, first-served basis. You do not need an appointment.

Mayor Bonnie Lewis says that COVID testing and COVID vaccinations will not take place on the same days. Citizens may go to any state health department to receive the vaccine including the Lincoln County Health Department at 1000 West Washington Street and the Tullahoma Health Department located at 615 Wilson Avenue.

“Right now, only state health departments have the vaccine for citizens but you can go to any health department you choose,” says Mayor Lewis.

State health departments will be closed on Thursday for New Years Eve and Friday for New Years Day. If you have questions, you may contact the Moore County Health Department at 931-759-4251.•

{The Lynchburg Times is the only independently owned and operated newspaper in Lynchburg, Tennessee. We cover Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

Give blood at the Moore County Battle of the Badges

Members of the Metro Fire Department and Metro Sheriff’s Department challenge Moore County citizens to show their big hearts on January 25 by giving blood at the Moore County Battle of the Badges Blood Drive. (File Photo)

EVENTS — Blood supplies across Tennessee, and much of the U.S., are at dangerously low levels due to recent severe weather and the holidays.  With that in mind, Lynchburg Mayor Bonnie Lewis issued a challenge to our local fire department and sheriff’s department to see which department can recruit the most eligible blood donors in the community during the annual Blood Assurance Moore County Battle of the Badges.

Metro Moore Volunteer Fire Department and Metro Moore County Sheriff’s Department will co-host a blood drive on Monday, January 25 from 12-5 p.m. at the Moore County Volunteer Fire Department located at 301 Majors Boulevard.

Fire Chief Mark Neal reminds locals that a single blood donation can support three or more medical needs in an area hospital.

“This is for anyone that would like to help a good cause,” said LES SRO Mike Rainey. “It would ne great to show how our small community can show up in large numbers.”

So, whether you are Team Sheriff’s Department or Team Fire Department, roll up you sleeves and help area blood banks. Blood Assurance encourages all donors to eat a good meal, drink plenty of water, and avoid energy drinks prior to making a donation.

All donors must be 18 years or older. Chief Neal says those who are short on time can visit the website to make an appointment for quicker turn around. For more information, visit the blood drive’s website by clicking here. •

{The Lynchburg Times is an independently owned and operated newspaper that publishes new stories every morning. Covering Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

Local health department prepping for vaccine arrival; move to COVID self tests three days a week

Per the state, local health departments, including Moore County, will go to self COVID testing three days a week to allow staff time to transition to vaccination prep. Health Department officials stress that free, local testing will still be available five days a week. (File Photo)

LOCAL NEWS — According to the State Department of Health, the Moore County Health Department will now offer COVID-19 self-testing kits to adults three days a week beginning December 21. The self tests are being added as an option to allow local staff to transition to vaccination of frontline health care providers and first responders. 

The new COVID-19 self-tests will be offered to adults on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays beginning Dec. 21. On these days, public health staff members at each TDH COVID-19 testing site will provide self-testing kits to adults who wish to be tested. Individuals will remain in their vehicles while completing paperwork and collecting their samples. Health departments will submit the samples for testing.

“We’re making this transition so our Department of Health staff can assist with administration of safe and effective COVID-19 vaccines,” said Tennessee Health Commissioner Lisa Piercey, MD, MBA, FAAP. “State-run health departments currently collect an average of only 16 percent of all COVID-19 tests statewide, and our change will not affect the wide availability of testing through private providers in Tennessee. While the arrival of vaccines is welcome, it is imperative that we not let up on basic best practices and continue to protect each other by wearing masks, practicing social distancing and staying home when sick.”  

Adults tested with the new self-tests will register and receive their results online. The self-tests are not approved for use in children under age 18. Children and adults unable to register online can still receive the standard nasal swab COVID-19 tests on Tuesdays and Thursdays. Test results may be available within 72 hours of arrival at the lab, depending on the volume of tests the testing lab receives. Information will be provided to participants at testing locations on what they can expect after being tested. 

The Moore County Health Department will be closed and will not offer COVID-19 testing on Christmas Eve and Christmas Day and well as New Year’s Eve and New Years Day.

The Moore County Health Department is located at 251 Majors Boulevard and free, drive thru testing will still be available Tuesday through Thursday from 8-11 a.m. at no charge for anyone who wishes to be tested. For more information, call 931-759-4251. •

{The Lynchburg Times is the only independently owned and operated newspaper in Lynchburg, Tennessee. We cover Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

Moore COVID cases skyrocketing

New cases of COVID more than doubled in Moore County over the weekend. Moore County now has the eighth highest rate of infection per population in the state of Tennessee. (File Photo)

Lynchburg seems to be hitting a tipping point in the COVID 19 pandemic — and not in a good way. New, active COVID 19 cases have skyrocketed in Lynchburg over the past seven days. We now sit at 522 total cases, including 24 new cases overnight and 27 new cases over the weekend. In the last seven days, we’ve added 84 new cases — over twice the number of the previous seven day period of 34 new cases. Our positivity rate is now 27.1 percent. To learn more about Moore County specific date, visit the state’s COVID 19 dashboard by clicking here.

According to state rankings by county, Moore County has the eighth highest rate of infection per population. Regionally, Lincoln County continues to be a hotspot with 56 new cases overnight and 346 over the last seven days. Lincoln has the highest rate of infection per population out of Tennessee’s 95 counties. Bedford County sits at number 11. Coffee County is at number 18. Franklin County is ranked number 39.

Nationally, COVID 19 is now the leading cause of daily deaths in U.S. — moving ahead of heart disease, according to the latest report from the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation. On average, the U.S. loses 2,353 Americans from heart disease each day. On December 8, the U.S. surpassed that number with 2,661 COVID death a day — a number that continues to rise.

According to the Federation of American Scientists, if Tennessee were an independent country, we’d have the eighth worst outbreak in the world. Only Rhode Island is fairing worst than the Volunteer State. Tennessee suffers from the second highest rate of infection per population with 107 new cases per 100,000 citizens per day.

The rising case numbers cause concern for overwhelming area hospitals. On Monday the state Hospital Capacity site provided by the Tennessee Department of Health showed that just 10 percent of the state’s ICU beds were available for new COVID patients. A surge of new patients could easily overload local systems. Even if beds are available, most hospitals are short staffed with doctors, nurses, and support staff stretched to their limits. •

{The Lynchburg Times is the only independently owned and operated newspaper in Lynchburg, Tennessee. We cover Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

First responders recognized for saving the lives of two Moore County men

When someone dials 9-1-1 in Moore County, sometimes the results are heart breaking and life changing and sometimes, based on the hard work or local first responders, you get “good outcomes.” This is the story of two of those times.

Mark Shavers and his wife, Diane, pose with the first responders who helped save his life at a recent Metro Council meeting. (Lynchburg Times Photo)

From no pulse, not breathing to back at home and back to work

In May, EMA Director Jason Deal sat in his office working with the scanner chattering in the background as usual when a page with a familiar address went out. The caller said his dad wasn’t breathing and wouldn’t wake up.

“I immediately recognized the address, so I decided to grab my keys and just head that way,” Director Deal said.

When he arrived, he found Mark Shavers sitting in his recliner — no pulse and not breathing. Instinctively, Director Deal grabbed the Automatic External Defibrillator (AED) from his vehicle, used it to shock Shavers heart back into rhythm, and started CPR.

Three minutes later, Metro EMS and Metro Sheriff’s Department officials arrived on the scene. After several minutes of CPR, Shavers pulse returned and he stabilized enough for transport. Metro Moore County Volunteer Fire Department members cleared and secured a landing zone and Shavers was transported via air ambulance to Vanderbilt University Medical Center.

Upon arrival there, Vandy staff immediately transferred Shavers to the Cath Lab where he receive life saving treatment. Thanks to the quick work of Moore County first responders, Shavers made a full recovery. Today, he’s back in his Lois home with his wife and resuming his normal life.

In a recent Metro Council meeting, EMS Director Deal and Metro Mayor Bonnie Lewis recognized local first responders for a Great Outcomes recognition in the Shavers case including: Hunter Case, Richard Medley, and Dwight Sullenger from Metro EMS; Jerrod Bradford and Austin McGee from Metro Sheriff’s Department; Mark Neal, Don Primus, and Jerry Dickey from the Metro Fire Department; and Forrest Bryan and Neal Glasgow from Metro Dispatch; as well as Judy Dreaddy and Landon Pupka from Vandy LifeFlight.

Gary Tipps survived a widow-maker heart attack thanks to the quick actions of Moore County first responders including his wife, Diane. Here he poses with that team that helped save his life at a recent Metro Council meeting. (Lynchburg Times Photo)

From a widow-maker to a full recovery

On the morning of August 20, Jack Daniel employee Clint Fanning was running late for work. Regardless, as he drove up Tanyard Hill, he noticed a man laying in his yard lifeless. His gut told him something just wasn’t right and he immediately called EMA Director Jason Deal’s personal cell phone. The two are friends from church.

“I answered the phone on my way into the high school to teach an Emergency Medical Responder class,” Director Deal says. “I assumed it would be something quick, something related to church.”

He was wrong and he could hear the panic in Fanning’s voice. When Fanning described the house, Director Deal knew exactly whose home it was. One, it’s the only house directly on Tanyard Hill Road as you drive up it from the square and two, one of the corrections officiers at the Moore County Jail, Diane Tipps, lives there.

Deals says he immediately called Diane to see if she knew what might be going on. She said she didn’t but she would try to call her husband. By the time she called back saying she wasn’t able to get Gary by phone, Deal already had Metro EMS, and Sheriff Tyler Hatfield on their way.

“When I arrived, Sherriff Hatfield was already on scene and actively doing CPR,” Deal says. “We immediately alerted Vanderbilt, got LifeFlight en route, and contacted the Metro Fire Department to set up a landing zone for the chopper.”

After performing CPR continuously, the team finally achieved spontaneous circulation again. Now stable, EMS loaded Tipps onto LifeFlight. When he arrived at Vandy, staff immediately transferred him to the Cath Lab, where they performed a surgery to install a stent. Everyone would later learn that Tipps survived what medical professional call a widow-maker heart attack or a massive heart attack that occurs when the left anterior descending artery (LAD) is completely blocked.

Thanks to the quick thinking and quick work of Moore County first responders, Tipps has made a full recovery.

In this case, EMS Director Deal and Metro Mayor Bonnie Lewis recognized local first responders for a Great Outcomes recognition including: citizens Clint Fanning and former sheriff’s deputy Robin Holt; Jackie Burton, Hunter Case, Callie Couch from Metro EMS; John LaCook, Don and Nancy Primus, and Scott Parks from the Moore County Fire Department; Sheriff Hatfield, Shane Taylor, and Dustin White from the Metro Sheriff’s Department; Robert Mathis and Jean Adkins from Metro Dispatch; as well as Judy Dreaddy and Sarah Sellers from Vandy LifeFlight.

Deal attributes to Public Safety Department

“These outcomes come from a wonderful team of responders working together to achieve one goal: to save a life and make a difference,” said Director Deal. “A few seconds too soon or a few seconds too late and we could have had a totally different outcome.”

Deal says he attributes the “good outcomes” to changes made over the past two years to the Public Safety plan like developing an on call program to help assist during high call volumes times for critical patients like Shavers and Tipps.

“This allows for more than one paramedic to respond to critical calls or to have a crew respond to a call when the primary unit is tied up on another call,” explained Director Deal.

Metro Dispatchers are now also trained in CPR, so they can give lifesaving medical advice over the phone to the caller prior to the EMS unit arriving on scene. In fact, all first responders train two to four hours each month on best practices, new guidelines, as well as passing competency checks.

Director Deal says starting in January, Metro Sheriff’s Department will begin Emergency Medical Responder Training, which will allow them to provide lifesaving help prior to EMS arrival if needed. Their area of concentration of training will be on the ABCs of getting a patient back: airway, breathing, and circulation. 

“There is no way any one of us can do it alone,” Director Deal stated. “So, with all the changes we’ve made in the last two years, this is the outcome of those changes.” •

{The Lynchburg Times is the only independently owned and operated newspaper in Lynchburg, Tennessee. We cover Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

Moore County doubles its number of new COVID cases this week

COVID 19 continues to spike across the United States and the state of Tennessee. But what do those number mean in a small, rural town like Lynchburg? Each Monday, The Lynchburg Times drills down and examines the global pandemic from a hyper local perspective to help Moore County make informed decisions. Here are five pieces of information, we think you should know from the last seven days:

In the last seven day (November 8-14), Moore County has gained 30 new, active COVID-19 cases and now has a 26.3% positivity rate, per the TN Department of Health. (Graphic Provided)

Moore County doubled its new case count this week. Moore County gained 30 new, active COVID-19 cases in the past seven days. Last Sunday, the state department of health reported 303 total cases and on Saturday that number is 329. That’s double the number of new cases from the previous week. From November 1-7, Moore County only gained just 13 new cases. According to the state, Moore County’s positivity as of Saturday was 26.3 percent. According to the World Health Organization, an positivity rate above five percent suggests that virus is spreading freely within a given community.

Every other southern middle Tennessee county also doubled their case count. Bedford County increased 229 cases last week (up from 104 the previous week). Coffee County went from 114 new cases to 181 new cases. Franklin County jumped 179 new cases (up from 76 the previous week) and Lincoln got 178 new case last week as compared to 86 the week before.

ICU bed capacity is just 11 percent in the state. According to the Tennessee Department of Health, 36 percent (or 530 beds) of the state’s isolated COVID beds are available and 11 percent (or 219 beds) of the state’s ICU beds are available for incoming COVID-19 patients. This week’s hospital capacity reports also states that 72 percent of the state’s supply of ventilators (or 2,576 ventilators) are available. To read the complete report, click here.

Moore County Junior Pro basketball seasons is a go. Despite the fact that both Director of Schools Chad Moorehead and several school board members expressed concerns the Metro School Board voted unanimously to move forward with Junior Pro Basketball at the LES Gym this winter. The measure closely follows the rules established for both Moore County High School an Middle School games and follows all TSSAA guidelines. The board gave Director Moorehead broad authority to pull the plug on those season “at his discretion” should it become necessary.

Mayor Lewis says she will not issue a mask mandate. Governor Bill Lee continues to refuse to issue a state wide mask mandate, instead pushing off the the issue onto county-level officials and local mayors. At the Lynchburg Chamber of Commerce meeting on Thursday, Mayor Lewis told the group that while she supports mask wearing, she did not feel as if the majority of Moore County citizens would support such a measure. Sheriff Hatfield has also previously stated that a local mask mandate would be next to impossible to enforce. •

{The Lynchburg Times is the only independently owned and operated newspaper in Lynchburg, Tennessee. We cover Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

Moore gains 21 new COVID cases this week

As shown on this TN Department of Health graphic, Moore County has experienced a total of 286 COVID-19 cases including 21 new cases this week.

As of this afternoon’s Tennessee Department of Health’s 2 p.m. numbers, Moore County confirmed 21 new, active COVID-19 cases this week. That’s down from 29 new cases last week. Our last reported positivity rate was 26.4 percent.

Coffee County continues to be a regional hotspot with 161 new cases this week. They has 163 new cases last week. Bedford County added 124 – an increase of 25 over the previous week. Franklin County and Lincoln County both reported fewer cases this week than last week.

Here’s are the other top three things you should know this week:

1 | Tennessee #9 state with most COVID cases. This week, a White House Coronavirus Taskforce report showed that Tennessee is among the top 10 states with the most new COVID cases. This week the state gained 15,401 new cases and there are currently 26,478 active cases, according to this afternoon’s TN Department of Health numbers. Governor Lee continues to resist issuing a state-wide mask mandate and instead leaves that decision up to local elected officials.

2 | More cases coming from counties without mask mandates. A Vanderbilt study released this week, states that Tennessee hospitals are seeing an increased number of patients from areas without a mask mandate. “We’ve seen a statewide increase in hospitalizations since early October, indicating that masking alone is not sufficient to curb further spread of the virus,” John Graves, associate professor of health policy at Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, said in a news release. “But it’s very clear that areas where masking requirements have remained in place have seen much lower growth in COVID-19 hospitalizations.”

3| State hosts free COVID testing in rural counties. The numbers clearly show that COVID cases are surging in rural areas. As such, the state will hold six free COVID 19 testing events in rural counties this weekend. The two in middle Tennessee are planned for Smith County and Wilson County.

To view the new COVID-19 Dashboard created by the TN Department of Health, click here. •

{The Lynchburg Times is the only independently owned and operated newspaper in Lynchburg, Tennessee. We cover Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

Free flu shots offered November 19

Write yourself a reminder. Free flu shots will be offered on Monday, November 19 in Wiseman Park from 1-4 p.m. (File Photo)

LOCAL NEWS — According to the state, seasonal influenza cases are already increasing across the state and they are encouraging citizens to get their flu vaccination sooner rather that later. As such, Tennessee county health departments – including the Moore County Health Department – will hold special “Fight Flu TN” flu vaccine events in all 95 Tennessee counties on November 19 to increase the number of people vaccinated across Tennessee.

The Tennessee Department of Health and Moore County Health Department will offer all Moore County residents free flu shots on Monday, November 19 at Moorehead Pavilion inside Wiseman Park from 1-4 p.m. No appointments are necessary.

“It’s important for everyone in Tennessee to get a flu vaccine, as we’ve seen an increase in seasonal flu activity in Tennessee in recent weeks and expect it to be around for many more,” said Tennessee Health Commissioner Lisa Piercey, MD, MBA, FAAP. “Vaccination is still the best protection we have against this serious and potentially deadly illness.” 

TDH and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommend a yearly flu vaccine for everyone ages six months and older. It’s especially important for pregnant women to get flu shots to protect themselves and their unborn children, as flu is more likely to cause severe illness in pregnant women.

Most people with the flu will experience symptoms such as fever, cough, congestion and body aches, and will recover on their own after about a week. However, infants, the elderly and people with certain medical conditions are at highest risk of severe complications from the flu. If you suspect you or someone in your family has the flu, call your health care provider for advice.

The flu virus is highly contagious, so it’s important for people who are sick to stay home and avoid contact with others until their symptoms have resolved to help prevent further spread of the illness. This includes staying away from work, school and other public places while ill.

For more information, visit the TDH Fight Flu website or contact the Moore County Health Department at 931-759-4251. •

{The Lynchburg Times is the only independently owned and operated newspaper in Lynchburg, Tennessee. We cover Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}