Moore gains 21 new COVID cases this week

As shown on this TN Department of Health graphic, Moore County has experienced a total of 286 COVID-19 cases including 21 new cases this week.

As of this afternoon’s Tennessee Department of Health’s 2 p.m. numbers, Moore County confirmed 21 new, active COVID-19 cases this week. That’s down from 29 new cases last week. Our last reported positivity rate was 26.4 percent.

Coffee County continues to be a regional hotspot with 161 new cases this week. They has 163 new cases last week. Bedford County added 124 – an increase of 25 over the previous week. Franklin County and Lincoln County both reported fewer cases this week than last week.

Here’s are the other top three things you should know this week:

1 | Tennessee #9 state with most COVID cases. This week, a White House Coronavirus Taskforce report showed that Tennessee is among the top 10 states with the most new COVID cases. This week the state gained 15,401 new cases and there are currently 26,478 active cases, according to this afternoon’s TN Department of Health numbers. Governor Lee continues to resist issuing a state-wide mask mandate and instead leaves that decision up to local elected officials.

2 | More cases coming from counties without mask mandates. A Vanderbilt study released this week, states that Tennessee hospitals are seeing an increased number of patients from areas without a mask mandate. “We’ve seen a statewide increase in hospitalizations since early October, indicating that masking alone is not sufficient to curb further spread of the virus,” John Graves, associate professor of health policy at Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, said in a news release. “But it’s very clear that areas where masking requirements have remained in place have seen much lower growth in COVID-19 hospitalizations.”

3| State hosts free COVID testing in rural counties. The numbers clearly show that COVID cases are surging in rural areas. As such, the state will hold six free COVID 19 testing events in rural counties this weekend. The two in middle Tennessee are planned for Smith County and Wilson County.

To view the new COVID-19 Dashboard created by the TN Department of Health, click here. •

{The Lynchburg Times is the only independently owned and operated newspaper in Lynchburg, Tennessee. We cover Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

Free flu shots offered November 19

Write yourself a reminder. Free flu shots will be offered on Monday, November 19 in Wiseman Park from 1-4 p.m. (File Photo)

LOCAL NEWS — According to the state, seasonal influenza cases are already increasing across the state and they are encouraging citizens to get their flu vaccination sooner rather that later. As such, Tennessee county health departments – including the Moore County Health Department – will hold special “Fight Flu TN” flu vaccine events in all 95 Tennessee counties on November 19 to increase the number of people vaccinated across Tennessee.

The Tennessee Department of Health and Moore County Health Department will offer all Moore County residents free flu shots on Monday, November 19 at Moorehead Pavilion inside Wiseman Park from 1-4 p.m. No appointments are necessary.

“It’s important for everyone in Tennessee to get a flu vaccine, as we’ve seen an increase in seasonal flu activity in Tennessee in recent weeks and expect it to be around for many more,” said Tennessee Health Commissioner Lisa Piercey, MD, MBA, FAAP. “Vaccination is still the best protection we have against this serious and potentially deadly illness.” 

TDH and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommend a yearly flu vaccine for everyone ages six months and older. It’s especially important for pregnant women to get flu shots to protect themselves and their unborn children, as flu is more likely to cause severe illness in pregnant women.

Most people with the flu will experience symptoms such as fever, cough, congestion and body aches, and will recover on their own after about a week. However, infants, the elderly and people with certain medical conditions are at highest risk of severe complications from the flu. If you suspect you or someone in your family has the flu, call your health care provider for advice.

The flu virus is highly contagious, so it’s important for people who are sick to stay home and avoid contact with others until their symptoms have resolved to help prevent further spread of the illness. This includes staying away from work, school and other public places while ill.

For more information, visit the TDH Fight Flu website or contact the Moore County Health Department at 931-759-4251. •

{The Lynchburg Times is the only independently owned and operated newspaper in Lynchburg, Tennessee. We cover Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

Area blood banks: We’re in critical need of blood donations

Donating blood can save the lives of your family, friends, and neighbors. And right now, local blood banks need donations more than ever.

Blood Assurance in Tullahoma made a plea for donations this week stating a “critical need” for almost all blood types. Blood Assurance say they have zero units of B- on the shelf, less than half a day of O+, O-, B+, and AB-, and only one day of A+ and A-. They also need platelet donations.

You can donate at the Tullahoma Donor Center located at 604 North Jackson Street. They are open Monday through Friday from 8:30 a.m. and 5 p.m. and the third Saturday of each month from 8 a.m. to noon.

The American Red Cross is also issuing am “urging need for blood.” They will host mobile blood drive at Moore County High School on Thursday, November 5 from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Click here to schedule a donation appointment. •

{The Lynchburg Times is the only independently owned and operated newspaper in Lynchburg, Tennessee. We cover Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

Flu shots available for Moore County students

Free flu shots will be given at all Moore County School next week – October 13 at MCHS and October 15 at LES. (File Graphic)

LOCAL NEWS — Flu season is right around the corner and most doctors recommend getting your flu vaccine by late October to ensure maximum effectiveness as cases begin to spike in November and continue to increase through February.

The Moore County Health Department will visit all three locals schools to administer free flu shots for anyone who wants them on October 13 and 15. Staff distributed forms to Lynchburg Elementary students on Tuesday, October 6 and to Moore County Middle School and Moore County High School students on Wednesday, October 7. All completed forms must be turned into school officials by Friday, October 9, according to Moore County School Nurse Shea Logan.

Flu shot will be given at MCMS and MCHS on Tuesday, October 13 and at LES on Thursday, October 15. For more information, call the Moore County Schools Central Office at 931-759-7303. •

{The Lynchburg Times is the only independently owned and operated newspaper in Lynchburg. We cover Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

Dispose of Rx drugs safely on Take Back Day on Oct. 24

Both Tullahoma and Fayetteville will host area prescription drop off spots for National RX Take Back Day on Saturday. (Graphic Provided)

Whether it’s opioid pain medications or antidepressants, keeping unfinished prescription drugs in your home can have dire consequences including accidental ingestion by a child, theft by someone struggling with addiction, or even easy access for a teenager experimenting.

Many simply throw unused pill in the trash or flush them down the toilet but this can have adverse environmental effects. Most rural sewage treatment plants lack the ability to thoroughly remove pharmaceutical residue from water supplies.

That’s why it’s crucial to dispose of unfinished prescriptions responsibly.

On Saturday, October 24 the U.S. Department of Justice and Drug Enforcement Administration will host a National Prescription Drug Take Back Day to provide a safe, convenient, and private means of disposing of unneeded prescriptions.

Though there are no collection sites in Moore County, according to Metro Moore Sheriff Tyler Hatfield, there are several sites in surrounding counties including the Tullahoma Walmart in Coffee County and Lincoln County High School in Fayetteville. All collections take place from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. For a complete lists of southern, middle Tennessee sites, click here. •

{The Lynchburg Times is the only independently owned and operated newspaper in Lynchburg. We cover Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

Moore County COVID Update: 6 Things You Need to Know This Week

(Graphic courtesy of TN Dept. of Health)

With the announcement of Friday’s numbers at 2 p.m., Tennessee reported 198,403 total confirmed COVID-19 cases. According to the state, 182,166 total COVID-19 patients have recovered or have inactive cases. Here’s the top six things you need to know for this week:

1| Moore County adds 20 new cases this week. On Friday, the seven day total for new cases in Moore County was 20. According to the Tennessee Department of Health, there are currently 33 active cases in Lynchburg and 189 total cases since the pandemic began. Moore County has experienced a single COVID-related death.

2| Coffee County leads regionally in active cases. Regionally, the active case counts are as follows: Bedford County 78 active cases with 17 deaths, Coffee County 225 active cases with 14 deaths, Franklin County 97 active cases with 10 deaths, and Lincoln County with 55 active cases and one death.

3| Visitation will not yet resume at Lynchburg Nursing Center. Based on new state guidelines, visitation will not resume at Lynchburg Nursing Center just yet. A center must remain new case free for at least 14 day to offer outdoor visits or limited indoor visits. LNC must remain new case free for 28 days to allow essential caregiver visits. To learn more, click here.

4| Governor lifted most COVID restrictions on Wednesday. On Wednesday, Governor Bill Lee lifted COVID-19 restrictions on 89 Tennessee counties including Moore County and the surrounding counties. He also signed Executive Order No. 63 which extended local county mayor’s authority to institute individual mask mandates. He extended the State of Emergency through the end of October.

5| Titans experience multiple positive tests. This week, the Tennessee Titans announced that multiple players and other personnel tested positive for the coronavirus. Sunday’s game against the Pittsburgh Steelers has been postponed. The club is not allowed to disclose whether the players tested positive or are only quarantining, per a union agreement.

6 | Senator Marsha Blackburn being tested after exposure. On Friday, President Trump announced that both he and First Lady Melania Trump had tested positive for COVID-19. Moore County’s Senator Marsha Blackburn flew with President Trump to the Ohio debated and stated Friday that she will also be tested for COVID-19.•

{The Lynchburg Times is the only independently owned and operated newspaper in Lynchburg, Tennessee. We cover Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

Moore County COVID-19 Update: 6 Things to Know This Week

This map represents cases by county as of Friday at 2 p.m. {Graphic Provided}

With the announcement of Friday’s numbers at 2 p.m., Tennessee reported 189,454 total confirmed COVID-19 cases. Our state experienced 136 new deaths this week but the deceased rate remains at around one percent. According to the state, 172,618 total COVID-19 patients have recovered or have inactive cases. Here’s the top six things you need to know for this week:

1| Moore experiences it’s largest one week increase. According to today’s numbers, Moore County gained 24 new COVID cases in the past seven days – from 145 on September 19 to 169 today. This is the largest weekly increase since the state began tracking numbers in March. There were more recoveries (17) than new active cases (11) in the past seven days. Moore County has experienced one COVID-related death.

2| Coffee County replaces Bedford as regional hotspot. Regionally, Coffee County experienced that greatest seven day increase with 141 followed by Franklin County (88), and Lincoln County (35). Previous regional hotspot Bedford County experienced the smallest increase this week with 33.

3 | More new state cases than recoveries reported this week. In state numbers, there were more new COVID cases (8015) in the past seven days than recovered/inactive cases (7636). Tennessee had 136 new COVID deaths this past week for a total of 2,352. Nearly three percent of Tennessee residents have reported confirmed cases.

4 | Regional testing moves from Manchester to Tullahoma. This week regional testing moved from the Old Southern Family Market in Manchester to Waggoner Park in Tullahoma. Free COVID-19 testing will take place at 1208 East Carroll Street in the pavilion closest to Industrial Boulevard. Locals may remain in their cars for testing.

5 | Nashville names hotspots. If you are headed to Nashville this weekend, it’s best to avoid COVID hotspot identified by the Metro Health Department this week including 49 sites and six downtown bars. These location have been linked to more than 2,600 cases of coronavirus and include Loser’s, Tootsie’s, Dogwood, Kid Rock’s Honky Tonk, Dawghouse Saloon, and Winners.

6 | Flu vaccinations are especially important this year. Health officials say in the midst of the COVID 19 health situation it’s now more important that ever to get a flu shot. According to the CDC, the flu viruses and the virus that causes COVID-19 will both be spreading this year and recommends that all people six months and older get a yearly flu vaccine. It’s best to get your flu vaccine before the end of October. •

{The Lynchburg Times is the only independently owned and operated newspaper in Lynchburg, Tennessee. We cover Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

Local blood supplies are critically low

Low blood supplies are low due to multiple recent traumas. Several area mobile blood drives are planned. {File Photo}

Multiple traumas in southern, middle Tennessee over the past several days have nearly exhausted local blood supplies and local blood banks are asking for donations … especially from O-positive, A-positive, A-negative, O-negative, and platelets donors.

“Multiple traumas used over 100 blood products a few nights ago and have exacerbated the already struggling blood supply,” Blood Assurance officials stated.

Regionally, local blood banks plan several area blood drives:

SUNDAY – Mobile blood drive at First United Methodist Church located at 100 South Jefferson Street in Winchester from 7:30 a.m. to 1 p.m.

THURSDAY – Mobile drive at Walmart located 1224 Huntsville Highway in Fayetteville from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.

THURSDAY – Mobile drive at Advantage Realty Partners located 861 McArthur Street in Manchester from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m.

In addition, the Blood Assurance Donor Center is located at 604 North Jackson Street and they schedule donation Monday through Friday and each third Saturday (September 19) and third Sunday (September 20) of the month. For more information visit their website or call them at 931-461-5773.•

{The Lynchburg Times is an independently owned and operated newspaper that publishes new stories every morning. Covering Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

State announces new COVID mental health helpline for Moore County

The state recently announced a COVID-19 Crisis Helpline for Moore and 20 other Middle Tennessee counties. Call 888-460-4351 if you need to talk to someone. It’s free and confidential. {File Photo}

A COVID-related illness or death of a loved one, the isolation of social distancing, unemployment, the stress of working from home, remote learning … it’s a lot. According to a recent East Tennessee State University poll more than half of Tennesseans reported feeling nervous, anxious, or on edge in the week before the poll.  More than two in five respondents reported feeling depressed (43.4%) and lonely (42.8%).

But help is available for those who reach out.

The Tennessee Department of Health recently announced a new mental health tool for those suffering from mental health stressors during the COVID-19 pandemic. Moore County will be one of 21 counties in Middle Tennessee supported by the Tennessee Recovery Project’s COVID-19 helpline at 888-460-4351.

The new helpline will also serve Bedford, Cheatham, Coffee, Davidson, Dickson, Franklin, Giles, Hickman, Humphreys, Lawrence, Lewis, Lincoln, Marshall, Maury, Montgomery, Perry, Robertson, Stewart, and Wayne counties.

A volunteer staff will answer the new helpline Monday through Friday from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. and Saturdays from 8 a.m. to 12 p.m. It’s available to anyone struggling with emotional stressors due to the pandemic. Staff will connect callers with local resource that can help.

“There are a lot of people out there, dealing with stress, anxiety, fear, and depression, who are hurting right now.  We want people to know that it’s OK to not feel OK right now and that help is available, and thanks to this grant, the department and our community providers will be able to help more people,” said TDMHSAS Commissioner Marie Williams, LCSW.  “We are grateful to our federal partners for this funding, and the department is committed to leveraging all available resources to support the needs of Tennesseans and the community providers who serve them.”

Federal grant dollars fund the new helpline through the Federal Emergency Management Agency and in partnership with Centerstone, the Tennessee Recovery Project, the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), and the Tennessee Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services. It’s part of a larger grant that seeks to offer crisis counseling in all 95 Tennessee counties.

For more information, visit the Tennessee Recovery Project Disaster Crisis Counseling Program’s Facebook page by clicking here. •

{The Lynchburg Times is an independently owned and operated newspaper that publishes new stories every morning. Covering Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

Local Public Safety official explains change in COVID numbers reporting

Thanks to Moore County Public Safety Director Jason Deal, we now understand a little more about the confusing COVID-19 numbers reported by the state last Thursday. On Friday morning, he shared information supplied by the Tennessee Department of Health (TDH) about the changes.

In it, state health official explain that they are “improving” the data to reflect the evolving knowledge of the pandemic in our state.

Two major changes

The reports now reflect two major changes. One, active cases are now calculated differently — shortening the active period from 21 days to 10 days. This is resulting in a huge difference in the active case count. Before the change, the TDH numbers reflected 36 active cases in Moore County. After the change, there were just 15.

According to TDH, the case count reports will now include figures for “Inactive/Recovered” cases and will no longer include data for “Recovered” cases. “Inactive/Recovered” cases will include people who are 14 days or more beyond their illness onset date (or, for asymptomatic cases, their specimen collection date). This will more closely align with what is now understood about the infectious period of COVID-19, as recent data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention show most patients with COVID-19 are no longer infectious after 10 days. Previously, TDH considered a case recovered after a 21-day period.

Also, the 18 new cases that showed up last Thursday were in part a data correction. According to the state around 1,700 Tennessee cases were incorrectly assigned to the wrong counties based on patient-provide information. This could for example happen with someone living inside Moore County has a Tullahoma or Mulberry zip code, which is common.

“These cases will be corrected all at once, which will result in case counts changes for some counties,” the state said.

It’s a statement that tracks. On September 3, Moore County’s new COVID cases jumped 18 from 97 to 115. Since then, Moore County gained no new cases on September 4 and September 7, and one new case on September 5, September 6, and September 8.

The state now also provides county snapshots that show total cases, hospitalizations, deaths, and inactive or recovered cases on a county level. To view that daily report by county, click here. •

{The Lynchburg Times is an independently owned and operated newspaper that publishes new stories every morning. Covering Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}