Moore firefighters awarded citizenship award

Moore County FCE member Diana Milner presents Moore County Volunteer Fire Department members (from left to right) Chief Mark Neal, Asst. Chief Don Primus, and Nancy Primus the 2020 Heart of Gold Award at last Thursday’s Lynchburg Chamber of Commerce meeting. (Lynchburg Times Photo)

LOCAL NEWS — Each year, members of Moore County FCE present the Heart of Gold Outstanding Citizenship Award to an individual or group whose service to the Lynchburg community goes above and beyond.

Past winners have included Moore County Public Library Director Peggy Gold, for who the award is named, as well as Dudley Tipps, Joe Millsaps, Claude Eady, Betty Robertson, Nancy and Don Primus, Larry Moorehead, , Bryant Morton, and Phyllis Smith.

Last Thursday, at the Lynchburg Chamber of Commerce meeting, FCE members presented the 2020 Heart of Gold Award to the Metro Moore Volunteer Fire Department (MMVFD).

During the presentation, FCE members highlighted the many volunteer activities that members of Moore County’s Volunteer Fire Department participate in addition to volunteering their time to train and serve the community as firefighters. The group work to install new smoke detectors and fire proof Moore County homes at no cost to citizens. They also coach youth sports teams, volunteer with Lynchburg Boy Scouts, assist with Second Harvest food drives, and sponsor 4-H campers at Camp Woodley.

It’s also a little known fact that MMVFD members often visit the Lynchburg Nursing Center and sing to residents and host a water station each year during the Oak Barrel Half Marathon. The also developed a Moore County tradition – the Firefighter’s Roast Corn booth at all major Lynchburg events.

“Many of these individuals volunteer countless hours despite the fact that they work full time jobs,” said FCE member Diana Milner during the presentation.

The MMVFD’s name will be added to the perpetual plaque that hangs in the Moore County Courthouse. FCE also made a $100 donation to the Lynchburg Boy Scouts on the MMVFD’s behalf. •

{The Lynchburg Times is the only independently owned and operated newspaper in Lynchburg, Tennessee. We cover Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

Jack Daniel kicks off Operation Ride Home fundraising with $100k donation

Jack Daniel’s Distillery and Armed Service YMCA kicked off Operation Ride Home fundraising on Veterans’ Day. (File Photo)

LYNCHBURG — For the past 10 years, Jack Daniel’s Distillery in Lynchburg has made sure American service members make it home for the holidays and special occasions. In partnership with the Armed Service YMCA, they’ve raised money to offer financial assistance to active-duty, junior-enlisted military and their families to travel  from their  military bases to loved ones’ homes across the country under Operation Ride Home. On Veteran’s Day, they kicked off fundraising for the program.

A video promoting the program launched on Veteran’s Day and features locals Jason Bobo, Rae Steelman, Paul Anderson, Patrick Hill, Drew Smith, Melvin Keebler, John Hart, and Blake Fitzpatrick. They are all U.S. military veterans who now work for the distillery. They all discuss how important it is to get to come home as a junior enlisted service members and how much they appreciate the support that their company gives the military.

In the video, Smith and Bobo visit a family with a Operation Ride Home check and the film follows a family as they get to travel to see loved ones in Seattle. Bobo and Smith also all discuss how much they appreciate the support that their company gives the military. To view the video, click here.

In total, Operation Ride Home has generated more than $1.8 million in donations that have allowed 8,583 service members to spend the holiday with their families. It’s assisted servicemen and women from the Army, Marine Corps, Navy, Air Force and Coast Guard with travel to all 50 U.S. states.

This year, due to the current pandemic, travel for these heroes is on hold until the lifting of Department of Defense restrictions.  But that’s okay Jack Daniel officials say, as soon as restrictions are lifted, the program will once again focus on reconnecting as many U.S. military families as possible.

“Serving in the military is stressful enough for our heroes, but this year even more so as they and their families sacrifice for us all while waiting to see their loved ones,” said Jack Daniel’s Master Distiller Chris Fletcher. “We will be pulling out all the stops to raise awareness of Operation Ride Home, help address the tremendous financial needs our junior-enlisted face and celebrate with them when restrictions are lifted and they can visit their loved ones.  It will be a special time and one they all so deserve.”

As it has done throughout the program, Jack Daniel’s kicked off the campaign with a $100,000 donation on Veteran’s Day and is asking friends to visit operationridehome.com and contribute to help more service members make it home. Their goal is to eclipse 10,000 service members and their families who have been assisted throughout the life of the effort as well as exceed $2 million dollars in overall donations. All donations are 100 percent tax deductible.

“Having been there, I know what it’s like when you’re a young servicemember trying to provide for your family while facing financial hardship and the stress that comes with wearing the uniform,” said ASYMCA President/CEO William French. “Operation Ride Home has made a tremendous difference in so many lives and this tenth anniversary is going to be special as we work to get as many home as we possibly can.  I can’t wait to look them in the eye and let them know they’re going home.”

The ASYMCA works with the various military commands in specific areas co-located with ASYMCA branches to identify and prioritize junior-enlisted service members and families most in financial need. Plane tickets and pre-paid debit cards are given to assist those traveling. Operation Ride Home is open to active duty E-5 and below, both single and married, who might not otherwise financially be able to travel home. The option to drive or fly is an individual decision. For additional information on eligibility and to view participating installations that qualify for travel assistance, click here. •

{The Lynchburg Times is the only independently owned and operated newspaper in Lynchburg, Tennessee. We cover Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

Moore County Angel Tree applications open

Angel Tree applications are now open to Moore County families. Applications may be picked up at the Moore County Public Library. (File Photo)

Folks in small towns take care of one another. Each holiday season community members and Moore County Angel Tree organizers join forces to make sure that no local child gets left behind.

Angel Tree applications are now open to any Moore County family who need a little help purchasing Christmas gift for their kids this year. To qualify, children must be between birth and 18 years old and be enrolled in Moore County schools. Parents will need to supply a correct mailing address and a working phone number.

Applications will be available through December 5 at 11 a.m. and may be obtained at the Moore County Public Library. If you have questions, contact Peggy Gold at 931-759-7285. The MCPL will close November 25-29 for Thanksgiving.

The Moore County Angel Tree Program is sponsored by the Moore County Resource Center. •

{The Lynchburg Times is an independently owned and operated newspaper that publishes new stories every morning. Covering Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

Community Foundation seeks Moore County non-profit grant applicants

Animal shelters, homeless services, and educational opportunities are just some examples of the hundreds of non-profit activities that the Community Foundation of Middle Tennessee funds. Their Discretionary Grants application period is open now. (File Photo)

Are you a Moore County non-profit organization attempting to make the lives of your fellow Middle Tennesseans better? If so, you should apply for a Community Foundation of Middle Tennessee (CFMT) grant. The application process opened on October 1 and will close on Friday, October 16 at 11:59 p.m.

CFMT awards grants to a wide variety of charitable purposes like education, the environment, the arts, health, and social services. Applicants must be a tax-exempt, nonprofit organization serving Middle Tennessee.

“We are particularly interested in grant proposals addressing currently unmet community needs and providing long-term solutions,” CFMT stated on their website.

Last year, the group awarded over $2 million dollars in grans to 365 local nonprofits organizations. Regional organizations that have benefited in the past include the Middle Tennessee Spay and Neuter Clinic in Bedford County, the Coffee County Imagination Library, and Good Samaritan Ministries of Franklin County.

For more information or to access the 2020 grant application, click here. •

{The Lynchburg Times is the only independently owned and operated newspaper in Lynchburg. We cover Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

Barn Dance in Wiseman Park benefits local non-profit

Horse Play Inc. provides therapeutic riding opportunities for local special needs kids. They will host a fund raiding barn dance on September 19 in Lynchburg. {Lynchburg Times graphic}

EVENTS — Local non-profit Horse Play Inc plans their second annual barn dance fund raiser – Swing and Sway for Horse Play – for Saturday, September 19 at Moorehead Pavilion inside Wiseman Park.

Tullahoma’s South Jackson Street Band will play live music. The event will also feature a live auction, door prize drawing, and concessions. According to event organizers, the dance will practice social distancing protocols and follow CDC guidelines throughout the event.

Horse Play is a local 501(c)3 non-profit that provides recreational horseback riding opportunities for children with mental or physical challenges. It’s run by a board of directors as well as a dedicated team of volunteers, medical professionals, and horse enthusiasts. Their stable of eight horses play a vital role in the well being of many Moore County special needs kids. Horse Play operates under the Professional Association of Therapeutic Horsemanship International (PATH).

Tickets are currently on sale and all proceeds benefit the non-profit. Single tickets are $15 and couples tickets are $25. Children 10 and under will be admitted free. You may also reserve of table for eight people for $125 donation. The event takes place from 6 to 9:30 p.m.

To purchase tickets in advance visit their website and click on the “Give” tab and you will be redirected to the Horse Play Giving Fund PayPal page. Tickets will also be available at the door. For more information, contact Loretta Christian at 931-434-1291, Jean Kelly at 931-247-5292, or Patsy Freeman at 931-581-1626. •

{The Lynchburg Times is an independently owned and operated newspaper that publishes new stories every morning. Covering Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

As number of dumped pets rises, local shelter needs donations and fosters

COVID-19 is causing a spike in dumped and abandoned pets in Moore County. Lynchburg Friends of Animals Rescue and Adoption Center needs your help to keep them safe and get them the medical care they need. {File Photo}

During the COVID-19 pandemic, local shelters across the country report a spike in dumped and abandoned pets.

One needs to only read Moore County social media posts from the past week to know it’s true. On August 31, a local found a boxer mix on Turkey Creek Run. Four days later, a litter of eight puppies was found in a ditch on Goosebranch Road. Later that same day, a mother and her four puppies were found less than a mile away. A day later, a local found two more pups on Nolen Road. Just yesterday, another set of dogs were discovered around Pleasant Hill Methodist Church.

What do they all have in common? The Lynchburg Friends of Animals and Rescue and Adoption Center will try to care for all of them. It’s an tough job during “precedented” times but one that’s becoming overwhelming during the pandemic. Four of the puppies found last week require treatment for PARVO.

“We have to hospitalize them with a veterinary hospital leaving us with an estimated $2400 for vet care and hospitalization of all four pups,” said LFoA Director Brandi Harrell. “That was the cheapest I found in such short notice. These babies need our help.”

Moore County does not offer animal control as a county service. Without intervention from a caring, local shelter animals like these are destined for heartbreak, trauma, and often death. That’s where Lynchburg Friends of Animals Rescue and Adoption Center comes in. And you can help. Supplies like dog food, cat food, litter, and puppy pads can be dropped off at the shelter located at 1980 Fayetteville Highway. A full wish list of needs can be found by clicking this link.

Harrell also says that the shelter desperately needs fosters to give vulnerable animals off local roads. Without fosters and with a full shelter, LFoA might need to turn animals away. She says the more fosters, the more lives they can save. LFoA pays for all vet bills, food, as well as related supplies.

You can also make a donation via PayPal through a link on their website.

If you’d like to help with the medical care for the four puppies battling PARVO, donations can be made at the vet clinics currently providing care: All Creature Veterinary Clinics in Tullahoma (931-455-6723) or Manchester (931-723-0551). •

{The Lynchburg Times is an independently owned and operated newspaper that publishes new stories every morning. Covering Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

5 Things to Do This Weekend

A hike past Adams Falls, an art show on the picturesque Monte Sano Mountain, and a whiskey tasting at a charming Winchester distillery … yeah there are lot of safe, small venue, socially distanced things to do this weekend. {File Photos}

We get it. Everyone grows weary of being stuck inside. As fall approaches, there are lots of outdoor or small venue events happening in southern, middle Tennessee that present an opportunity to safely get out and explore. So mask up, grab the hand sanitizer, stay six feet apart, wash your hands, and enjoy a little socially-distanced fun.

Hike in Tullahoma — Summer is winding down and with the first day of fall right around the corner, locals better grab all those opportunities to explore outside. On Sunday, you can explore the Short Springs, Adam Falls area with Tennessee State Naturalist Randy Hedgepath. The guided 2.5 mile hike will begin and end at the parking lot on Short Springs Road. Hikers will enjoy the moderate Adam’s Falls Trail past Machine Falls while enjoying gorgeous flora and fauna of the South Cumberland along the way. This hike will be limited to 12 people and you can sign up by calling 931-455-1121. Masks are recommended. For more information, click here.

Antique Tractor Show in Eagleville — If you are heading to the Moore County versus Forrest game on Friday anyways and you happen to have a little man who is all about tractors, leave a little early and stop by the Pioneer Days Antique Tractor Show on the way. Hosted by the Tennessee Valley Pioneer Power Association, and features lots of makes and models of antique tractors, trucks, cars, lawn tractors, and other gas powered engines. The free event takes place on Friday and Saturday. For more information, click here.

Art Show in Huntsville — It’s been an end of summer tradition on Monte Sano Mountain for two decades, and it will happen in 2020 with a few social distancing measure in place to keep everyone safe. The Monte Sano Art Festival kicks off on Saturday at 9 a.m. and will feature over 100 local and regional artists as well as area food trucks. Attendees must wear a mask. For more information, click here.

Whiskey Tasting in Winchester — There’s a charming little distillery located right off the historic Winchester Square call Branchwater. Master Distiller Bud Kelley makes some fabulous (and potent) southern, middle moonshine there. On Thursday, they’ll host a Ladies Night. Local gals are invited to come from 3-7 p.m. and taste some of what they have to offer including their new frozen drinks. For more information, click here.

Food Trucks at Beans Creek Winery — A local winery is great. A local winery with a food truck is outstanding. On Saturday Mark’s Specialty Seafood will return to Bean’s Creek Winery in Manchester for both lunch and dinner. Enjoy a refreshing wine slushy as well as seafood favorites like fried scallops, conch fritters, lobster roll, catfish fingers, and more. For more information, click here.

{The Lynchburg Times is an independently owned and operated newspaper that publishes new stories every morning. Covering Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

150,000 Purple Martins roost in downtown Nashville

Thousands of Purple Martin take over the trees near the Schermerhorn Symphony Center in downtown Nashville. {Photo Provided}

NASHVILLE — Due to COVID-19, the Nashville Symphony isn’t currently performing but there’s still a show happening nightly in downtown Nashville. An estimated 150,000 Purple Martins have taken up roost in the tourist district on the plaza outside the Schermerhorn Symphony Center … and they are causing quite the stir.

Purple Martin exist as a staple of Tennessee summers. They arrive each March, many to the same Martin house or box they’ve summered in for years, and leave each September to winter in South America and the Amazon. Each year, the global population of martins gather at just 350 roosting sites to prepare for their winter migration. {Editor’s Note: We reported on the Purple Martin’s return to Moore County earlier this year, to read that coverage, click here.}

Martin and humans enjoy a special relationship. They are North America’s largest swallow and in the East, they are nearly 100 percent dependent on human-made birdhouses for nesting areas. It’s a tradition started by this areas Native Americans who once hollowed out gourds to provide nesting spots. They can be seen in all 95 Tennessee counties but rarely in urban areas.

“Most of the purple martin population no longer nests in natural cavities. The species only continues to exist because individuals invest in and maintain purple martin houses,” said Tennessee Wildlife Federation (TWF) CEO Michael Butler. “When we saw what was happening downtown, it only seemed right to the Federation to share in the cost of their roosting site when it’s hurting a fellow nonprofit already impacted by the pandemic.”

If you’re looking for a fun, social distanced outing, the Purple Martins are putting on quite the show … but it will have a short run. They’re fueling up for a long flight back to South America. Be warned though as the birds swan dive and move in ballet like motion across the sky, they tend to poop … and 150,000 birds create a lot of it. It covers the sidewalks, the fountains, the windowsills, the Symphony Hall, the trees outside … and you might get dive bombed just looking up. You’ve been warned. The flock of birds are also loud and can be heard from blocks away.

Purple Martin are protected migratory songbirds by the Migratory Bird Treaty Act, so despite the fact that they’re wreaking havoc, the symphony is being patient if not chagrined hosts. They says once the Martins have traveled South, they’ll break out the press washers. Until then they’re enjoying a bit of entertainment … completely on brand for 2020.

In fact, they’ve partnered with the TWF to raise money to help with the unexpected clean up costs. Without income from performances, the symphony — like many non-profits during COVID — doesn’t have extra cash just lying around. The TWF will match donations dollar-for-dollar (up to $5,000). This partnership transformed the Purple Martin visit from a nuance to a once-in-a-lifetime performance.

“We are profoundly thankful to Tennessee Wildlife Federation, as well as to The Nature Conservancy and other conservation groups, for stepping in and helping raise funds to help us take care of the Schermerhorn,” said Nashville Symphony President and CEO Alan D. Valentine. “This will help us stay focused on the critical work of bringing back the musicians and staff who fulfill the Nashville Symphony’s mission of providing great music and education programs to the diverse population of Middle Tennessee.”

The TWF set a goal of raising $10,000 for the clean up and as of September 1, they’d raised $10,600.77. If you’d like to contribute to help with the clean up, click this link. •

{The Lynchburg Times is an independently owned and operated newspaper that publishes new stories every morning. Covering Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

Jack Daniel hosts virtual music festival to benefit musicians affected by COVID-19

Alabama Shakes lead singer Brittany Howard (left), singer, songwiter Nathaniel Rateliff (top right), and California indie band Cold War Kids (bottom right) will headline Jack Daniel’s Distillery virtual music festival this Friday and Saturday to support musicians affected by COVID-19. {Photos Provided}

Our local product and live music have a storied history together. From Frank Sinatra’s professed love of Old No. 7 to the recent release of the limited edition Eric Church Single Barrel Bottle … where you find great music, you’ll usually find a bottle of Jack.

Live musicians like the ones we flock to see on Lower Broadway or at Bonnaroo … well, they are struggling. Festival cancellations and music venue closings have upended their livelihoods.

Enter Jack Daniel’s Distillery … together with Crash the Couch, they are raising funds for the Sweet Relief COVID-19 Musicians Fund. On this coming Friday and Saturday (August 14 and 15), Brittany Howard, Nathaniel Rateliff, and Cold War Kids will headline the two-day, online festival on Jack Daniel’s YouTube channel.

Denver-based singer, songwriter Rateliff and California indie rock band the Cold War Kids will headline Friday night along with opening acts like Tank and the Bangas, Hiss Golden Messenger, the Suffers, and Goldlink. Alabama Shakes lead vocalist Brittany Howard will headline night two along with Black Pumas, Brandy Clark, Houndmouth, Durand Jones, and Yola. All performances will be filmed from the artist’s homes all around the country. There performance will be interspersed with live cocktail demonstrations.

So login, make a donation, and raise a glass. •

{The Lynchburg Times is an independently owned, community newspaper that publishes new stories every morning. Covering Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

Second Harvest addresses COVID-19 related food insecurity

Second Harvest Food Bank of Middle Tennessee is looking to help Moore County non-profits address food insecurity in our community during the COVID-19 pandemic as part of the Tennessee Community CARES Program. {File Photo}

Did you know that one in eight Middle Tennesseans including one in seven children struggle with hunger daily? The COVID-19 pandemic and all it’s complications has only made things worse but help is on the way for Moore County non-profits seeking to make life easier.

Second Harvest Food Bank of Middle Tennessee announced today that they will serve as one of six administrators across the state to help distribute $150 million in grant monies made available by the Tennessee Community CARES Program. Grant applications will remain open through August 15. Click here to access the application.

The point of contact for Moore County non-profits interested in receiving grants that address food insecurity will be Second Harvest Food Bank of Middle Tennessee. You can apply by following this link. The point of contact for other COVID-19 related needs will be the United Way of the Mid-South. Click here for to learn more about their grant administration process. All eligible recipients must be a 501(c)(3) organization.

“We are grateful to be chosen as one of six grant administrators for the Tennessee Community CARES Program to help families suffering increased food insecurity due to the pandemic and encourage local groups and non-profits to apply for these grants,” said CEO of Second Harvest Food Bank Nancy Keil. “This funding will be crucial in helping our partner agencies and other non-profits across the state make sure no children or family goes hungry during this difficult time.”

Funds can be used for expenses occurring from March 1, 2020 through November 15, 2020 and related to the COVID-19 pandemic.

The intention of the grants will be to address situations created by or made worse by the COVID-19 pandemic. Examples of activities that might receive funding include educational support for school-aged children and their families exacerbated by the COVID-19 outbreak, workforce training, emergency food assistance, care for at-risk populations, emergency assistance to help locals avoid eviction or foreclosure, etc. For a full list of qualifying activities, click here.

Applications will be processed on a first-come, first-served basis, according to the state’s press release. Grant awards will also include a monthly reporting requirement and a de-obligation date of November 15.

Other statewide non-profits assisting in administering the funds include United Way of Great Chattanooga, United Way of Great Knoxville, United Way of Great Nashville, and Women’s Foundation for a Greater Memphis. •

{The Lynchburg Times is the only independently owned and operated newspaper in Lynchburg. We cover Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}