Moore gains 21 new COVID cases this week

As shown on this TN Department of Health graphic, Moore County has experienced a total of 286 COVID-19 cases including 21 new cases this week.

As of this afternoon’s Tennessee Department of Health’s 2 p.m. numbers, Moore County confirmed 21 new, active COVID-19 cases this week. That’s down from 29 new cases last week. Our last reported positivity rate was 26.4 percent.

Coffee County continues to be a regional hotspot with 161 new cases this week. They has 163 new cases last week. Bedford County added 124 – an increase of 25 over the previous week. Franklin County and Lincoln County both reported fewer cases this week than last week.

Here’s are the other top three things you should know this week:

1 | Tennessee #9 state with most COVID cases. This week, a White House Coronavirus Taskforce report showed that Tennessee is among the top 10 states with the most new COVID cases. This week the state gained 15,401 new cases and there are currently 26,478 active cases, according to this afternoon’s TN Department of Health numbers. Governor Lee continues to resist issuing a state-wide mask mandate and instead leaves that decision up to local elected officials.

2 | More cases coming from counties without mask mandates. A Vanderbilt study released this week, states that Tennessee hospitals are seeing an increased number of patients from areas without a mask mandate. “We’ve seen a statewide increase in hospitalizations since early October, indicating that masking alone is not sufficient to curb further spread of the virus,” John Graves, associate professor of health policy at Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, said in a news release. “But it’s very clear that areas where masking requirements have remained in place have seen much lower growth in COVID-19 hospitalizations.”

3| State hosts free COVID testing in rural counties. The numbers clearly show that COVID cases are surging in rural areas. As such, the state will hold six free COVID 19 testing events in rural counties this weekend. The two in middle Tennessee are planned for Smith County and Wilson County.

To view the new COVID-19 Dashboard created by the TN Department of Health, click here. •

{The Lynchburg Times is the only independently owned and operated newspaper in Lynchburg, Tennessee. We cover Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

Raiders look for revenge against Mt. Pleasant in final regular season game

Senior Raider play makers Donavin Pearson (#40), Kyler Parker (#5), and Brayden Cashion (#11) will be looking to exact a little revenge Friday night against Mt. Pleasant. The Tigers beat Moore County 47-28 last year in Maury County (Photo Credit: Emily Black for the Moore County Sports Network)

SPORTS — It was an ugly, embarrassing loss. That’s what the Moore County Raiders senior football players remember about last year’s 47-28 game in Mount Pleasant.

“With what happened last year with them, I just want to beat them so bad,” said senior wide receiver Joshua Parks during Coach’s Corner on the Moore County Sports Network on Saturday. “It was ridiculous last year.”

Despite their 1-8 record, the Mount Pleasant Tigers enter Raider Stadium as a dangerous foe. Five of their regular season loses — Summertown, Richland, Loretto, ZCA, and Eagleville — were all one possession games. The Tigers, who have experience positive team COVID cases this year, also forfeited a game to Cornersville. Beating the Raiders on Friday night could make their season and they’ll come onto Doug Price Field motivated.

The Tigers also possess the weapons to score. Senior quarterback Te’Varius Strayhorn (#6) frequently scrambles outside the pocket for positive yards. He’s pieced together 134 yards on the ground this season.

The leading Tiger rusher is Zavier Davidson (#27) with 592 total rushing yards and seven touchdowns. Senior Ladontay Patton (#23) and freshman Keegan Cooper (#22) have also combined for another 641 yards on the ground.

On defense, the Raider offense will need to keep an eye on Ethan Beasley (#46) who’s racked up 63 tackles and seven sacks this season. Senior Jerimiah Dobbins (#32) has also racked up 50 tackles so far this year.

When asked how he planned to approach his final regular season game, Coach Kris White told the Moore County Sports Network that he plans to treat it like any other game.

“I want to go 9-1. I think it would be huge for this class of seniors to go 9-1 in their regular season,” he said. “We also wanna just get better from week to week. If we want to make a run at the playoffs, we have to get better each week.”

That mission got accomplished last Friday night against Richland as things started clicking for the Raider offense. Helped by the play of the offensive line, the Moore County running game became explosive in the 35-7 win against Richland. If the Raiders can continue to build on that solid rushing attack this weak, it will open up the passing game and give Raider QB Kyler Parker ample weapons to choose from against the Tigers.

Moore County will play their final regular season home game this Friday against Mount Pleasant. It will be First Responder’s Night. Kick off will be at 7 p.m.

 If you can’t attend the game, it will be broadcast live on Raider Country 105.1 and 95.5 FM with Joe Abraham and the Moore County Sports Network, on the NFHS Network, or The Lynchburg Times will post live score updates on our Facebook page. •

{The Lynchburg Times is the only independently owned and operated newspaper in Lynchburg, Tennessee. We cover Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

Class of 2021: TN Promise application deadline is Nov. 2

TN Promise reminds the MCHS Class of 2021 that the deadline to apply to attend a local community college or technical school tuition free is rapidly approaching. (File Photo)

If you are a Moore County High School senior who plans to attend a local community college or technical school after graduation time is running out to apply for the TN Promise scholarship.

TN Promise gives students the opportunity to access last-dollar scholarships. It allows every high school student to attend a community or technical college tuition-free. Applicants also have access to critical non-financial supports as part of the program, including a volunteer mentor from their community.

“Over 10,000 high school seniors have yet to sign for the state TN Promise scholarship program. Those who fail to apply by Monday, November 2 will be permanently ineligible for the scholarship,” said TnAchieve officials.

TnAchieves recognizes that the college and scholarship process is daunting and offers support to both students and families in the process. Students in need of application support can reach out to tnAchieves by emailing tnAchieves@tnAchieves.org.

Current high school seniors must apply for TN Promise by November 2, at www.tn.gov/tnpromise. If you have any questions, please visit www.tnAchieves.org. Students must also complete the 2021-22 FAFSA by February 1, 2021 to remain eligible. •

{The Lynchburg Times is the only independently owned and operated newspaper in Lynchburg, Tennessee. We cover Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

Motlow nominates Flatt for excellence award

Motlow College recently nominated Larry Flatt for a Statewide Outstanding Achievement and Recognition (SOAR) Staff Excellence Award. Flatt’s been instrumental in the development of Motlow’s Automation & Robotics Training Center. (Photo Courtesy of Motlow College)

He’s partnered with the world’s leading automation and robotics manufacturers to develop advanced training opportunities for student right here in southern, middle Tennessee and now Motlow State would like to honor him with a Statewide Outstanding Achievement & Recognition (SOAR) Staff Excellence Award.

Motlow State recently selected Automation & Robotics Training Center (ARTC) Executive Director Larry Flatt as its nominee for the annual Tennessee Board of Regents (TBR) awarded each year.

The SOAR Staff Excellence Award’s foremost criterion is overall excellence in the responsibilities of a staff member’s specific appointment service and/or professional activity. Service is also recognized on many levels, including service to the department, school, college, profession, and community. Candidates should be able to demonstrate distinction beyond typical job responsibilities, reflecting excellence in those areas.

Flatt joined Motlow in 2012 and was a leader in creating the ARTC, overseeing the construction of the facility, and partnering with automation and robotics manufacturers to develop advanced training opportunities. He earned his bachelor’s degree from Tennessee Tech University and his M.B.A. from Middle Tennessee State University.

“Larry has a unique compilation of knowledge, experiences, abilities, skills, and credentials,” said Executive Vice President of Workforce and Community Development Tony Millican. “His personal example represents a compelling industry-to-education career transition that is exceptionally valuable to the TBR mission. His shift from industry leader to education entrepreneur should inspire professionals in a variety of fields to share their occupational successes with generations of new learners.”

Flatt has been instrumental in developing partnerships with the world’s top three robot manufacturers: ABB, FANUC, and Yaskawa Motoman. Flatt has also cultivated partnerships with Southern Controls, Inc., Bertelkamp, Irby, Wesco, and Parker Hannifin to offer additional industry training and certification opportunities in automation and fluid power.

“The ARTC is offering courses that are essential to the needs of local industry that utilize robots,” said Flatt. “Our vision of formally partnering with industry to provide training to the exact specifications of the robot manufacturer has come to fruition. The Center provides the opportunity for individuals already employed in the robotics field to receive additional manufacturing-specific education and certification. It also provides an educational pathway for Motlow students who are seeking an A.A.S. degree or certification in robotics.”

The ARTC earned a 2019 National Association of Developmental Organizations (NADO) Impact Award for its support of regional workforce development and a 2020 Community Colleges of Appalachia (CCA) Award. Motlow has earned additional awards for the graphics that adorn the facility and the promotion of the ARTC.

The 12,500-square-feet ARTC is located on 4.5 acres of land, donated by the Warren County Commission, adjacent to the Motlow State and Tennessee College of Applied Technology campus in McMinnville. The ARTC offers automation training, including digital systems, sensors, electronics, hydraulics, pneumatics, programming, and alarm management. Robotic training can be realized through two distinctive pathways: training for industry and job seekers and college credit instruction.

For more information, visit the Motlow State website. •

DREMC crews aid hurricane stricken Louisiana

DREMC lineman Matt Swan wades through the muddy and flooded electric right-of-way to begin rebuilding a section of line destroyed by Hurricane Delta. (Photo Provided)

Hurricanes Laura and Delta pounded the southern coastal states – leaving a path of destruction and hundreds of thousands without electricity in impacted areas, especially Louisiana. That’s when linemen from Duck River Electric Membership Corporation (DREMC) rush in to help.

“In emergencies, crews work long days in difficult and dangerous conditions,” said DREMC Operations Superintendent Lusk. “In Louisiana, not only did crews work in dangerous conditions and unfamiliar territory, but they also dealt with flooded areas that made accessing some of the damage difficult. High temperatures and humidity increased worker fatigue. Regardless of the conditions, DREMC employees were quick to respond to the call for help, and we appreciate their willingness to assist others.”

In September, 16 DREMC linemen volunteered to rebuild electric infrastructure in Deridder, Louisiana, a hard-hit area that lost power to all of its 43,000 members following both hurricanes. Due to the widespread damage caused by first hurricane and the long-expected power restoration times, DREMC assembled two initial volunteer line crews to assist Beauregard Electric Cooperative, Inc (BECI). Each crew spent several days rebuilding electric lines, which allowed for significant progress to be made for residents who had been without power for weeks.

The Duck River Electric crew set many of the new poles in Louisiana’s Beauregard Electric Cooperative, Inc. service area in the aftermath of the hurricane. This photo reveals how hurricane wind gusts tore through trees, which contributed to bringing down electric lines.

“One of the crew members said they repaired more powerlines during this restoration effort than in any other storm they’ve worked,” said Lusk.

On October 9, Hurricane Delta, a Category 2 storm, slammed the same areas of Louisiana, as well as other coastal states, dropping more than a foot of rain as powerful winds battered communities already ravaged by Hurricane Laura. Delta left more than 600,000 homes and businesses along the Gulf Coast without power where electric services had just been rebuilt and restored. 

For the second time in six weeks, BECI lost power to all its members. Many of the assisting electric cooperatives who previously helped returned to assist following Hurricane Delta. A third DREMC crew volunteered to help repair the second round of damage.

“If there is a bright side to getting hit with two consecutive hurricanes, it is that Hurricane Delta did not inflict the same level of devastation to the electric systems there,” said DREMC’s Lewisburg District Manager Troy Crowell. “Hurricane Laura left miles and miles of electric lines destroyed, which our crews, along with hundreds of other line workers, helped rebuild. After Delta hit, much of the new lines and poles are still standing, and that helped speed the recovery process.” 

DREMC linemen volunteering to assist Louisiana with power restoration included Chad Anderson, Bryan Burton, Taylor Byrd, Joel Doak, Tommy Fly, Eli Gore, Patrick Hunt, Charlie Jacks, Matt Keele, Rob Mason, Scott McGill, Jonathan Riley,  Sean Scheller, Robert Smartt, Trey Stewart and Matt Swan.•

{The Lynchburg Times is the only independently owned and operated newspaper in Lynchburg. We cover Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

Goodbranch, Goosebranch added to Moore County fiber expansion

If you’ve noticed large rolls of orange conduit along Moore County roadways, it’s part of an over $1.1 million project to expand fiber Internet in Moore County. Two new roads were announced this week. (File Photo)

LOCAL NEWS — According to Mayor Bonnie Lewis, two new roads have been added to the fiber expansion project funded by a federal grant from the CARES Act. Goodbranch Road and Goosebranch Road have been added to the project allowing an additional 162 Moore County homes and businesses to connect to Monster Broadband’s fiber Internet network.

The $192,330 grant will be issued to Metro Moore County as part of the Local Government Allocations portion of the CARES Act monies. This grant money is in addition to the $1.1 million grant that Monster recently received to add 26 new miles of fiber Internet coverage inside Moore County. (To read our full coverage of that grant, click here.)

“We had to make sure our plan for the CARES Act funds was not duplicated with any other requests through the PATRIOT Act or other sources of funding,” explained Mayor Lewis. “Because most all of our PPE and employee expenses were met through other sources we decided to apply for additional broadband coverage in the county. Monster Broadband had already applied for and received their CARES Act grant ($1.1M) paid to businesses to expand coverage. We decided to use our allocation to pick up where their grant stopped.”

All hands on deck for the December 15 deadline

The deadline for both projects is December 15 and the Monster team is working overtime to get the work done including hiring additional contractors.

“This is really an all hands on deck situation,” says Monster Broadband co-owner Charles “Boo” Johnston. “We are working day and night to get the project up and running — not only to meet the deadline but also because we realize that quality Internet is now more important than ever with so many Moore County citizens working and attending school from home. We really appreciate the public’s patience.”

As a public utility, Monster works along Moore County roads in the right of way. Johnston says that even though he knows it’s disruptive, he instructing his crews to do everything possible to put things back exactly as they found them — though that often takes a little time.

Johnston and Steve Baker, two MCHS class of 1990 graduates, launched Monster Broadband in 2009. Last year they launched their first fiber network in the Ridgeville subdivision along Tims Ford Lake. Since then, they’ve brought fiber speeds of up to 250 megabytes per second to over 500 homes in both Tennessee and Texas, where Baker now lives.

Citizens who live along Goodbranch and Goosebranch can contact Monster Broadband via email at sales@monsterbroadband.com to pre-order the service. Once they have your name, address, and a phone number, they will contact you as soon as your home is install ready, Johnston says.

Click here to like the Monster Broadband Facebook page and stay updated. •

{The Lynchburg Times is the only independently owned and operated newspaper in Lynchburg. We cover Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

State working with local schools to distribute pandemic EBT food cards

The state recently waived the application process for the Pandemic EBT cards. They are now being distributed directly to schools. (File Photo)

The state designed the program to replace meals lost to students due to COVID-19 school closures and now Pandemic EBT cards are being distributed directly to schools for parent pick up – essentially waiving the application process. All cards are kept in Central Offices for pick up.

To qualify, your child must have already qualified to receive free or reduced-price meals at school in March, April, or May of this year. P-EBT benefits do not replace any child nutrition program meal being offered through the local school system. Children may continue to receive “grab and go” meals at the Lynchburg Elementary Cafeteria.

To pick up the P-EBT cards, qualifying families will need to provide a valid ID to the school. Cards that aren’t picked up after 30 days will be returned to TDHS and disposed.

Families who currently receive SNAP or Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TAFN) benefits will have funds added directly their program EBT card.•

{The Lynchburg Times is the only independently owned and operated newspaper in Lynchburg. We cover Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

Offensive line leads Moore County to a 35-7 win over Richland

Senior linebacker Donavin Pearson tackles a Richland player Friday night in their 35-7 win in Lynchburg. Pearson led the Raider defense with nine tackles including five solo tackles. (Photo Credit: Emily Black for the Moore County Sports Network)

SPORTS — On a warm October night with a pink MC glowing center field, the Moore County Raiders showed up and showed out with a 35-7 win over those other Raiders from Richland.

It was an impressive Moore County performance on both sides of the ball. The Raider offense flexed it’s depth with five different players finding the end zone. Two offensive tackles eighth grader Aydan Blair and freshman Landon Jolley paved their way creating huge holes.

On defense, the Raiders forced over 15 Richland plays for either a loss or no gain. Senior cornerback Joshua Parks also snagged a key interception and Hayden Carter added one more.

You get a touchdown and you get a touchdown

In the first half, four different Columbia blue jerseys made their way into the end zone. Senior Moore County quarterback Kyler Parker got the scoring started a little over a minute into the game when he called his own number and outran defenders for six points. Senior kicker Chase Bradford’s PAT sailed good and Moore took a quick, 7-0 lead.

After the play, Moore County fans could hear a Richland coach yell towards his players, “You’ve got to stay behind that guy.”

On their first series, Richland found some running room up the middle to get second and four. Then senior linebacker Donavin Pearson stopped the play for no gain. Moore County hurried the Richland QB on the next play and the Raiders in orange were forced to punt.

On the next Moore County drive, it was senior running back Tyler Smith’s chance to get on the boards. After positive yardage plays by freshman running back Dawson White, QB Parker, and senior wide receiver Brayden Cashion, Smith shook off Richland tackles to score six Moore County points. Bradford’s PAT made the score 14-0.

On the next series, the Raider defense forced three straight plays for no gain before a long pass play bailed the Richland offense out on a third and 10. After another three consecutive no gain plays, Richland got another first down through the air. Then, on first and 10, Pearson slung down the runner for a loss. The next Richland pass fell incomplete and then on third and 10, Hayden Carter intercepted the ball to give the Raiders the ball back with three first quarter seconds remaining.

The two Raider teams then traded possessions. On the next Moore County offensive possession, QB Parker broke free and got shoestring tackled near the goal line. On second and goal, he got the ball to Cashion who ran in for six points. Bradford’s PAT gave Moore County a 21-0 lead with 6:26 to play in the first half.

Richland’s next drive went three and out. With four minutes to play in the first half, Smith broke free for a 30 yard run to set up QB Parker to then run the ball to the goal line. With 35 seconds remaining on a third and two, Dawson White found the end zone. Bradford’s PAT gave Moore County a 28-0 lead over Richland at halftime.

Richland narrowly avoids the shut out

After the break, the defense continued to impress and Moore County forced four consecutive no gain plays to force the Richland punt. Then, on first and 10, Kaden White caught a Parker pass, made a man miss, and ran untouched into the end zone. Bradford’s PAT gave Moore County a 35-0 lead.

The two Raider teams then exchanged possessions. On the next Richland drive, they managed second and nine inside the red zone before Joshua Parks intercepted a pass at the goal line to give Moore County back the ball. At the 99 yard line, Moore County pieced together positive yardage before fumbling the ball with 7:30 to play in the game.

As the clock ran down, Moore County fans got a glimpse of the future of Raider football as Coach White substitute heavily getting younger players key reps. Wes Clifton ran the ball for four yards. Clifton, Noah Whitaker, Blake Bradford, Dusty Thomas, Will Harder, Will Parker, Logan Hegwood, Zac Carawan, Joseph Trice, Cody Trussell, and Tanner Parks all got in the defensive mix.

Richland narrowly avoided the shut out with 12 seconds remaining on a completed 32 yard pass along the far right side. Moore County beat Richland 35-7 at home. The win clinches second place in Region 5A and will likely earn them a home first round play off game.

After the game, Raider Head Coach Kris White told the Moore County Sports Network that he attributed a lot of the win to excellent play by the offensive line.

“Those guys are making holes for these running backs to get to the second level without getting touched and that’s huge for us,” he said.

Moore County stats versus Richalnd

Moore County spread the scoring around with Kyler Parker, Dawson White, Brayden Cashion, Kaden White, and Tyler Smith all earning six points. Chase Bradford was a perfect five of five on point after attempts.

QB Parker connected on 10 of 14 passes for 109 passing yards. He also scrambled for 11 carries on the ground for another 132 yards. He led in rushing yards followed by Tyler Smith with 111.

Kaden White led in receiving with four receptions for 68 yards.

On defense, Donavin Pearson led with nine tackles including five solo tackles. Kaden White and Tyler Smith followed with eight tackles each and Dawson White added six more. Both Joshua Parks and Hayden Carter snagged key interceptions.

Moore County will play their final regular season home game this Friday against Mount Pleasant. It will be First Responder’s Night. Kick off will be at 7 p.m.

 If you can’t attend the game, it will be broadcast live on Raider Country 105.1 and 95.5 FM with Joe Abraham and the Moore County Sports Network, on the NFHS Network, or The Lynchburg Times will post live score updates on our Facebook page. •

{The Lynchburg Times is the only independently owned and operated newspaper in Lynchburg, Tennessee. We cover Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

Moore County gains 29 new COVID cases this week

Moore County gained 29 new COVID-19 cases in the last seven days. That’s almost double the number of the previous seven day period. (Graphic Courtesy of TDH)

Moore County almost doubled our seven day COVID cases totals the week. From October 16-23, Moore County gained 29 new active cases as compared to 15 in the previous seven day period. Our positivity rate for this week was 15.7 percent.

Regionally, Coffee County continues to be a regional hotspot with 163 new cases in the past seven days. Other counties were as follows: Bedford (99), Franklin (90), and Lincoln (82)

1 | State surpasses 3,000 dead Tennesseans due to COVID. On Thursday, Tennessee passed a sad milestone when the Tennessee Department of Health reported 3,011 deaths in the state due to COVID-19.

2 | Drive thru testing available in Grundy County this weekend. According to the Tennessee Department of Health (TDH), free COVID-19 testing will be available on Saturday, October 24 from 9 a.m. until noon at Grundy County High School located at 24970 TN-108 in Coalmont. TDH personnel will offer nasal swab testing and results should be available within 72 hours.

3| Tennessee hospitals and a college issue joint statement on rising COVID-19 cases. On Tuesday, three major Tennessee hospitals (Ascension St. Thomas, Tristar Health, and Vanderbilt Health) and Meharry Medical College issued a joint statement “Strongly urging everyone in Middle Tennessee, and all Tennesseans, to remain vigilant in the efforts to limit spread of the virus by wearing masks, washing hands, an staying socially distant — including not participating in large gatherings.” To read the full statement, click here.

4 | Coronavirus cases spiking in nursing homes. The White House coronavirus task force sent a sharp warning to Gov. Bill Lee last week saying the coronavirus numbers in nursing homes are spiking, contributing to the state having one of the highest spikes of the virus in the country. This included Moore County’s only nursing home. LNC tests patients and staff twice a week, according to the state and the most recent positivity rate is 15.4 percent. According to the state, the last positive test at LNC happened on October 12 or 11 days ago. The center must have no new cases for 14 days in order to be eligible for visitation.

5 | Hospitalizations are also spiking in Tennessee. As of Friday’s numbers, there are currently 3,756 confirmed COVID-19 hospitalizations in the state according to the TDH. This including 2,033 ICU cases and 1,723 patient on ventilations. Twenty one percent of hospital beds were available. Click here for the hospital capacity report.

6 | State launches new COVID 19 resource for citizens. Locals can locate a testing site, answer screening question to determine if you should be tested or quarantine, or view most a county and state dashboard. To visit the site, go to https://covid19tn.gov. •

{The Lynchburg Times is the only independently owned and operated newspaper in Lynchburg, Tennessee. We cover Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

State launches new COVID website for citizens

The new state website includes a COVID dashboard specifically for Moore County. Here is shows the number of cases reported per day along with the seven day average. (Graphic Provided)

This week, the Tennessee Department of Health launched a new state website (covid19.tn.gov) to help citizen get information and track the virus in their communities.

The new site addresses prevention including masks, which reduce COVID exposure by as much as 80 percent, according to the site. It also encourages frequent hand washing, social distancing, frequently cleaning and disinfecting, covering your coughs and sneezes, and staying home if you feel sick.

It also explains the symptoms of COVID-19, which included a cough, fever, and shortness of breath. It offers a self screening tool and helps those concerned that they may have been infected find the nearest testing site.

The website provide both state and county level dashboards. It shows total cases, deaths, hospitalizations, and inactive/recovered cases. It reports numbers of cases reported per day, testing per day, and the seven day positivity average.

To view the new Moore County dashboard, click here. •

{The Lynchburg Times is the only independently owned and operated newspaper in Lynchburg. We cover Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}