White returns to Lynchburg; this time as Raider head football coach

MOORE COUNTY — Moore County High School’s new coach is their former coach.

Director of Schools Chad Moorehead announced this week that former Raider assistant coach Kris White would be returning to Moore County to lead the 2020 team … but this time as their head coach.

“We are very excited to have Coach White back,” Director Moorehead told The Times. “Coach White has been a part of multiple state championship teams and we expect that he will continue to build on the strong football tradition in Moore County.”

Kris, who is a native of Murfreesboro, is married to Moore County native Holly Dickey White, an outstanding coach in her own right. She left an MCHS coaching position in 2009 after leading the Raiderettes to a state runner-up finish.

Kris graduated from Riverdale High School and then attended Middle Tennessee State University. He played as a student athlete at both schools. He started his coaching career at Riverdale High School before heading to Moore County. He left the Raiders in 2009 to take an assistant position with Oakland High School. He is leaving his current position at Knoxville Catholic High School to return to Moore County.

This will be his first head coaching position. In addition to his wife, Holly, he’ll be returning to Moore County with his two sons: Kaden age 18 (an incoming high school senior) and Dawson, age 15 (an incoming freshman).•

{The Lynchburg Times is the only independently owned and operated newspaper in Lynchburg. We cover Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

COVID-19 Update: 4 Things You Need to Know This Week

{Graphic Courtesy of TN Dept. of Health}

With the announcement of Friday’s numbers at 2 p.m., Tennessee reported 22,085 confirmed COVID-19 cases in the last seven days (1,890 more than the previous week). Our state experienced 27 new deaths this week. According to the state, 14,965 total COVID-19 patients have recovered. That’s around 67 percent of reported cases. As of today, 421,967 of Tennessee’s 6.8 million residents have been tested. Here’s the top four things you need to know for today:

1| State will no longer identify COVID patients to first responders. This week, Governor Bill Lee announced that the state health department will no longer provide first responders with the names and addresses of confirmed COVID-19 patients in their respective counties. At the beginning of the pandemic, the Department of Health originally declined to hand over identifying data but Governor Lee overturned that decision.

2 | In Tennessee, Chattanooga and Nashville are a hot spot. This week both Chattanooga and Nashville were identified as a national COVID-19 hot spot by a recent Dataminr Study. To read our coverage of that study, click here.

3 | CVS opens drive through testing centers. On Thursday, CVS Health announced the opening of 18 COVID-19 drive through testing spots in the state including spots in Murfreesboro and Nashville. Patients must register in advance at the CVS website. Tests will be processed through an independent lab and be available in around three business days.

4 | All Tennessee nursing home residents and staff must be tested by June 30. The Department of Health will now require all Tennessee nursing homes to complete a “intent to test” prior to June 30. Facilities that don’t test could be subject to losing their state license, suspensions, or fines. All nursing home and long care facilities also must remain closed to visitors for the time being.

{The Lynchburg Times is the only independently owned and operated newspaper in Lynchburg. We cover Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

Three Coffee County Jail employees test positive for COVID-19

MANCHESTER — According to a press release, three Coffee County Jail employees have tested positive for COVID-19 but there are no confirmed cases within the prison population. The three employees live together in the same apartment, according to the release.

Coffee County Sheriff Chad Partin stated in the release that all remaining staff have been notified and given information about being tested. He also stated that the jail is following and will continue to follow all national, state, and local social distancing practices.

The Coffee County Jail is located at 76 Hillsboro Highway in Manchester. For more information, contact the Coffee County Sheriff’s Department at 931-728-3591. •

{The Lynchburg Times is the only independently owned and operated newspaper in Lynchburg. We cover Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

Farmers Market will happen in Wiseman Park again on Friday

LYNCHBURG — Due to an increased chance of rain Friday afternoon, the Lynchburg Farmers Market will once again take place at Moorehead Pavilion in Wiseman Park from 2-5 p.m.

The Lynchburg Farmers Market happens again Friday afternoon and we’ve confirmed a local meat producer will be there to sell to the public. {File Photo}

Vendors will offer locally-grown fruits and veggies, herbs, fresh flowers, local honey, and Metro Mayor Bonnie Lewis confirmed Thursday afternoon that a local producer would be on hand selling fresh, USDA-inspected steaks, ground beef and pork sausage.

“Maybe one day they will get to try their new venue on the hill,” Mayor Lewis joked.

The Lynchburg Farmers Market will happen every Friday … either at the corner of Majors Boulevard and Mechanic Street or in Wiseman Park from 2-5 p.m. •

{The Lynchburg Times is the only independently owned and operated newspaper in Lynchburg. We cover Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

Georgia peaches headed to Tullahoma

Fresh, picked-that-day peaches from Fort Valley, Georgia will be available in Tullahoma on June 17 … but this year you’ll need to pre-order. {File Photo}

TULLAHOMA — Just in time for summer … it’s time to get your Georgia peaches. The Peach Truck will make its annual June trek into southern, middle Tennessee the third week of June … and this year due to social distancing guidelines, locals will need to pre-order.

Each year the truck delivers the first peaches of summer, Clingstone peaches, to our area just a few hours after they’ve been picked from all the way in Fort Valley, Georgia. That red Georgia clay and abundance of sunshine creates sweet, juicy peaches that surpass any you’ll find on local grocery shelves.

On Wednesday, June 17 The Peach Truck will roll through Northgate Mall beginning at 2:30 p.m. Peaches are sold by the 25 pound box for $43. All peaches must be pre-ordered at The Peach Truck website this year. They will not have items for walk-up purchase.

For more information, visit their Facebook page or their website. •

{The Lynchburg Times is the only independently owned and operated newspaper in Lynchburg. We cover Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

Lynchburg Music Fest hints a 2020 venue

Fans line up at last year’s Lynchburg Music Fest in Wiseman Park. This year’s event will take place at a yet-to-be-disclosed farm south of Lynchburg. {Photo Credit: Stacy Preston Photography}

MOORE COUNTY — They recently added a third date to their normal Friday, Saturday line up and now Lynchburg Music Fest organizers are hinting at their 2020 venue … though they are stopping short of an exact address just yet.

“All the details that we are giving at this time is that it is a private farm on the south side of the county owned by Lynchburg Music Fest called Music Hollow,” LMF Founder Jonny Hill told us. “It is a huge farm and everything will be on site this year. We will be giving the exact location soon.”

Earlier this year, the event announced that it would now take place on three days, October 2-4. Kip Moore will headline Sunday. Other performers have yet to be announced.

Tickets for the 2020 Lynchburg Music Fest are available now. Click here for more details. •

{The Lynchburg Times is the only independently owned and operated newspaper in Lynchburg. We cover Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

State Officials: 2020 tick season could be worse ever

With so many people flocking outdoors, health officials say we should be extra diligent about avoiding tick bites. {File Photo}

Forget Murder hornets … state officials say locals should worry more about ticks in 2020. According to officials with the UT Ag Extension office, mild temperatures and lots of rain this winter will combine for higher than normal number of the creepy little bloodsuckers – especially in May and June when they tend to be more active.

According to local vet Dr. Bryant Morton, he’s already seeing both dogs and cats suffering the affects of tick bites this year and the season’s barely begun.

When it comes to pets, Dr. Morton advises that an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of veterinary cure, which can often be lengthy, expensive, and largely unsuccessful. Dogs most commonly suffer from rickettsial disease, which causes shifting leg lameness, reoccurring fevers, and overall malaise. In cats, bobcat fever is more common. Both collars and topicals are available for both dogs and cats that kill ticks but they are notoriously difficult to repell, according to Dr. Morton. Owners can also give dogs oral monthly products.

Human exposure greater due to COVID-19

In Tennessee, there are 15 different ticks species many whose bite can cause serious disease in humans. In fact, 60 percent of the Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever cases in the United States come from just five states: Tennessee, North Carolina, Oklahoma, Arkansas, and Missouri.

Experts expect another trend to affect the number of local tick bites this season. Due to COVID-19 concerns, a greater number of people are spending time outside now more than ever.

When spending time outdoors, especially in wooded areas and tall grass where ticks like to hide, experts recommend wearing long pants or spraying your clothes with tick repellent. Experts say throwing your clothes immediately in the washer or in a hot dryer for 10 minutes when you get home will keep ticks from lingering. You should also shower within two hours.

It’s a good idea to thoroughly check yourself and others for ticks when you return. If you locate one of the creepy little hitchhikers, pull it off with tweezers as close to the skin as possible. It’s also a good idea to throw the specimen into a plastic container and preserve in the freezer in case illness symptoms develop later. This will make both diagnosis and recovery easier.

For more information about tick-borne diseases, check out the state health department’s website.

{The Lynchburg Times is an independently owned and operated newspaper that publishes new stories every morning. Covering Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

Lynchburg Alzheimer’s walk planned for Sept. 19

Participants gather near the Moore County Courthouse at last year’s event. {Photo Provided}

LYNCHBURG — If you just look at the numbers, it’s a devastating disease. Alzheimer’s is the sixth leading cause of deaths in the U.S. affecting more women than men. Almost two-thirds of Alzheimer’s patients in the U.S. are women. In total, more than five million Americans are living with the disease and another 16 million caregivers are affected.

Each year, across the country communities come together to raise money for research as well as patient and caregiver support.

According to organizers, the Lynchburg Walk to End Alzheimer’s will take place on the Lynchburg Square on Saturday, September 19 with registration opening at 7:30 a.m. and the walk beginning around 8:45 a.m.

All proceeds benefit the local Alzheimer’s Association office that provides 24/7 care and support for local families while also supporting important Alzheimer’s research.

Currently, nearly 30 teams from Lynchburg and the surrounding communities are registered for the event. To register your team, visit the Alzheimer’s Association website or visit the local event’s Facebook page. •

{The Lynchburg Times is the only independently owned and operated newspaper in Lynchburg. We cover Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

Lynchburg native killed overnight in crash

Thomas Sullenger, better known as Matthew by close friends, died in an overnight two vehicle collision in Mulberry. {Photo Courtesy of Facebook}

Many in Lynchburg woke up Wednesday morning to shocking news, one of their own died unexpectedly overnight in a horrific car crash in Mulberry. According to family members, Thomas (Matthew) Sullenger died Tuesday night. He was just 45 years old.

According to the Tennessee Highway Patrol report, Sullenger was traveling east on the Lynchburg Highway in Mulberry around 5:30 p.m. when his 1997 Oldsmobile struck a guardrail and then traveled into the left lane striking a 2003 Ford Ranger driven by Richard Wiser, age 77, of Fayetteville.

After the collision, Sullenger’s vehicle came to stop pinned against the guardrail, according to THP’s preliminary report. Wiser was transported to Huntsville Hospital, according to family members.

Graveside service held on Friday

Born on September 12, 1974 in Tullahoma to Thomas and Debra Sullenger, Matthew lived in Lincoln County and worked at Higgins Funeral Home as a funeral director and embalmer. He graduated from Moore County High School before attending Faulkner University, Slidell Baptist Seminary, and graduated from John A. Gupton College of Mortuary Science.

According to his full obituary, “Matthew was of the Baptist faith. He loved his boys, his family, and his baseball boys very much. He enjoyed coaching baseball, spending time with family and friends, bass fishing, as well as, making everyone smile.”

In additional to his parents, he is survived by his children,Gavin and Breyer Sullenger, of Huntsville and Joey Hobbs of Fayetteville; brother, Mark Sullenger of Tullahoma; nephew, Miles Sullenger of Winchester; and niece, Courtney Sullenger of Winchester; along with several aunts and uncles.

Graveside services will be held at Lynchburg Cemetery on Friday, May 29 at 2 p.m. You can view the full obit by clicking here. •

{The Lynchburg Times is the only independently owned and operated newspaper in Lynchburg. We cover Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

Chattanooga becomes National COVID hotspot

According to a recent published report by The New York Times, Chattanooga (Hamilton County) reported 186 new cases and two additional deaths since Friday, making them a national Coronavirus hotspot. Their report is based on a recent Dataminr study that identified 22 small metropolitan and rural counties across eight states. The story also identified Nashville (Davidson County) as a national hotspot among major urban counties.

According to the report, Chattanooga’s rate of new cases per day is the fifth highest in the nation, doubling about every nine days.

On Sunday, the state reported 70 more cases in Chattanooga, which was the largest one-day jump since the global pandemic began. On Tuesday, the Tennessee Department of Health reported 642 total Chattanooga cases and 15 deaths.

Local health officials attributed the jump in number to an increase in testing stating that 14,000 more residents (or four percent of the population) have now been tested.

During a press conference on Tuesday, Health Department Administrator Becky Barnes stated that despite the uptick, Chattanooga still had enough open hospital beds to handle the surge including 52 adult intensive-care unit beds and 361 adult ventilators available. •

{The Lynchburg Times is the only independently owned and operated newspaper in Lynchburg. We cover Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}