Vaccine Scene: Long lines, short supplies lead to frustrations

Despite showing up early, many locals aged 75 and older left without getting the COVID-19 vaccination on Saturday due to short supplies. (File Photo)

LOCAL NEWS — This past Saturday marked the first date citizens throughout the state could receive the Tennessee Department of Health COVID-19 vaccine and things were kind of a mess everywhere.

In nearby Tullahoma, citizens 75 and older could be seen lining the streets of Wilson Avenue as early at 7 a.m. in 40 degree temperatures waiting their turn to get vaccinated. The debacle made national news.

In Moore County, local senior citizens lined up well before the 8 a.m. start time as well but thanks to quick thinking by local officials, they remained in their vehicles instead of braving the elements.

“We knew our older citizens would show up early and we tried to anticipate that,” says Metro Mayor Bonnie Lewis. “This is the age group that survived polio. They know what it’s like to watch a deadly virus sweep across the country.”

Despite their best efforts, some citizens who showed up on Saturday still walked away empty handed. The local health department ran out of doses before 2 p.m. — so did Coffee, Grundy, and Franklin counties.

“No health department anywhere got sufficient supplies of the vaccine for the numbers that showed up to be vaccinated,” Mayor Lewis says.

Mayor says vaccinations will be drive thru moving forward

The press release the state department of health issued on Wednesday stated that vaccinations would be given on a “first-come, first-served” basis and without an appointment leaving local health care workers trying to accommodate both those who just showed up as well as those who called ahead.

“It’s important to realize that health care workers remain the state-defined vaccination priority,” said Mayor Lewis. “No matter when they show up, they move to the front of the line.”

Moving forward, Mayor Lewis says that all future vaccination days will take place in Wiseman Park so that drive thru vaccinations can be offered without congesting local traffic.

Mayor Lewis also says that health officials are developing a pre-registration process to help public vaccination dates run more smoothly in the future. •

{The Lynchburg Times is the only independently owned and operated newspaper in Lynchburg, Tennessee. We cover Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

Area state parks offer first day hikes

Several area Tennessee State Parks will kick off New Year’s Day with Guided First Day Hikes. (File Photo)

Tennessee State Parks will sponsor free, guided hikes on New Year’s Day. Many state parks will host its own special hike. It’s a great way to safely spend time with friends and family to kick off the new year. Here are those happening closest to Lynchburg:

WINCHESTER | Tims Ford State Park — Local rangers will lead locals on a 2.5 mile loop hike out the Lost Creek Overlook Trail to the Lost Creek Overlook and return on the Overlook Trail. Online registration is required and due to COVID-19 restrictions, the event will be limited to 50 hikers. This is a free hike, however donations are encouraged and will go toward firefighting supplies and equipment to keep the parks safe and beautiful. Hikers should meet at 10 a.m. at the Visitors Center. Click here for more information.

MANCHESTER | Old Stone Fort State Park — Meet Ranger Caleb Doster at the Old Fort State Park Museum Roof at 1 p.m. for a two hour strenuous hike along the 3.5 mile Backbone Trail. Hikers will walk along the Enclosure Trail and see the prehistoric Native American Mounds while discussing their cultural significance to the area. As you hike, you will see both the Big and Little Duck Rivers, as well as the three magnificent waterfalls. Temperature on Friday will hover around 70 degrees but there is an 80 percent chance of rain, so dress accordingly. Hikers are encouraged to bring their own water and wear sturdy hiking shoes. Leashed dogs are welcome. For more information, click here.

BEERSHEBA SPRING | South Cumberland State Park — There is no more picturesque spot in south central Tennessee that Stone Door located inside South Cumberland State Park. Park Ranger Kristin Willis will lead hikers on a two mile hike to the best overlook in the park. Meet at 1183 Stone Door Road at 9 a.m. There’s a 90 percent chance of rain on Friday and temperatures should be in the mid-sixties. Dress appropriately. Click here for more information.

Tennessee State Parks’ First Hikes are part of America’s State Parks First Day Hikes initiative in all 50 states. Most hikes are free but each state park accepts donations. To see all the First Day Hikes being offered in our state on January 1, 2021, click here.•

{The Lynchburg Times is an independently owned and operated newspaper that publishes new stories every morning. Covering Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

Citizen vaccinations begin in Moore County

On December 21, local first responder Hunter Case became the first person in Moore County to receive the COVID-19 vaccine. (Photo Provided)

LOCAL NEWS — On December 21, Metro Assistant EMA Director and Critical Care Paramedic Hunter Case became the first person in Moore County to receive the COVID-19 vaccination. Since then, local health department officials have been busy behind the scenes giving the vaccine to high exposure health care workers, residents and staff of Lynchburg Nursing Center, first responders, dental and medical office staff, funeral and mortuary workers, and other state identified tier 1 individuals.

On Saturday, January 2 from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., the Moore County Health Department will be open and offering COVID-19 vaccinations to anyone 75 years of age and older. Vaccinations are free and offered on a first-come, first-served basis. You do not need an appointment.

Mayor Bonnie Lewis says that COVID testing and COVID vaccinations will not take place on the same days. Citizens may go to any state health department to receive the vaccine including the Lincoln County Health Department at 1000 West Washington Street and the Tullahoma Health Department located at 615 Wilson Avenue.

“Right now, only state health departments have the vaccine for citizens but you can go to any health department you choose,” says Mayor Lewis.

State health departments will be closed on Thursday for New Years Eve and Friday for New Years Day. If you have questions, you may contact the Moore County Health Department at 931-759-4251.•

{The Lynchburg Times is the only independently owned and operated newspaper in Lynchburg, Tennessee. We cover Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

Dave, Frank, Little Richard, and Johnny: Lynchburg lost a host of famous faces in 2020

{Editor’s Note: This article originally published on December 31, 2020 with one glaring omission, Dave Fruehauf. As soon as a reader pointed out the mistake, we immediately updated and republished.}

One might say that 2020 was a year of loss. We lost normalcy and precedented times. Everyone reading this article lost someone dear to them. Here in Lynchburg, we lost three notable names that were icons to the world but friends and neighbors to us.

Captain Dave E. Fruehauf 1937 – 2020

Famous Blackbird Pilot Dave Fruehauf dies at 83 | In October, Lynchburg lost one of its local characters and an aeronautical legend, Dave Fruehauf. Dave and his trusty companion, a rescued Labrador mix named Jack, could be seen most mornings taking their lap around the Lynchburg Square. What many locals did not know, and Dave would never tell you, is that Dave Fruehauf was kind of a big deal. He was one of only a handful of Air Force pilots to ever fly the famed, stealth Blackbird SR-71. Click here to read our editor’s personal essay about him, Saturdays with Dave.

Frank Bobo 1929-2020

Former Master Distiller Frank Bobo dies at the age of 90 | In January, Jack Daniel’s Distillery’s fifth master distiller, Frank Bobo, died at the age of 90. To locals, he would be remembered as “Frog” Bobo, a true southern gentleman, a veteran, Raider fan, and a man with a deep and abiding love for his beloved, Avalee. Frank Bobo oversaw whiskey-making during a time of rapid growth in the Holler. During his tenure, the distillery went from operating just two stills to five. Through it all, Bobo diligently stuck to the Lincoln County Process. He was committed to making the whiskey the, “same way Jack did” despite the ever-growing pressure to produce more of it. He retired in 1989 but his legacy lives on at Jack Daniel even today. In fact, his grandson, Chris Fletcher, took over the reigns of Jack Daniel Master Distiller in October. To read our complete coverage of his death, click here.

Richard Wayne Penniman aka Little Richard 1932-2020

Little Richard dies at the age of 87 | There’s Lynchburg famous and then there’s famous, famous and music legend Richard Wayne Penniman, lovingly known as Little Richard, was both. He lived as one of the founding fathers of rock and roll, R&B legend, Hall of Fame member, contemporary of Elvis, influencer of Prince and the Beatles, and the guy would who offer you a broad smile while buying his milk at Woodard’s in Lynchburg. One things for sure, Little Richard made an impression in a town that sees its fair share of famous faces … but not as a tourist. He was one of our own … as neighbor and friend. Everyone in Lynchburg has a Little Richard story including our editor. She shared it in a personal essay about Little Richard following his death. You can read that essay by clicking here.

John Terrill Majors
1935-2020

Coaching legend Johnny Majors dies at 85 | To sports reporters and ESPN types around the globe he was known as Johnny Majors, the legendary Iowa State, Pittsburgh, and Tennessee Volunteers coach but folks around Lynchburg knew him as John Terrell Majors, son of Coach Shirley and Elizabeth Majors – a former Moore County Raider and part of the origin story of the fierce Moore County Huntland rivalry. On June 3, family members announced that Majors had died at home. In a statement released by the family, John’s wife of 61 years, Mary Lynn Majors said, “It’s with a sad heart that we make this announcement. John passed away this morning. He spent his last hours doing something he dearly loved: looking out over his cherished Tennessee River.” To read our complete coverage of his death, click here.•

{The Lynchburg Times is the only independently owned and operated newspaper in Lynchburg. We cover Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

The Lynchburg Times Top 10 stories of 2020

Big changes at the distillery, a playoff run and Mr. Football finalist for the MCHS Raiders, a fiber Internet expansion, and a community coming together in a global pandemic – these are some of our Top 10 headlines from 2020. (File Photos)

Just because Lynchburg’s located in a small Tennessee county doesn’t mean we don’t experience big headlines that trickle through the nation. In 2020, The Lynchburg Times covered lots of headlines. Here are our top 10:

10. Buddy the Beagle gets his own Facebook Page | There’s famous and then there’s Lynchburg famous and Buddy the Beagle is definitely the later. Whether he’s cruising the historic Lynchburg Square looking to score some snacks or up at the Jack Daniel’s Visitor’s Center getting belly rubs from the tourist, Buddy is nothing if not popular. In January, one of Buddy’s friends at Jack, Allison Goodwin Hartung, decided he deserved his very own Facebook page. You can follow his hijinks there. Click here to read that story.

9. Nearest Green and Jack Daniel distillery create diversity partnership | Much of the foundational history of Lynchburg revolves around the unlikely friendship of two men, Jasper Newton Daniel and Nathan “Nearest” Green. Even if you don’t know it, the two shaped Moore County in countless ways that still echo today. So in June it felt fitting that their two distilleries would partner to shape the future of the distilling industry in ways that would have made both men proud. Together, they made a $5 million pledge to launch the Nearest Green School of Distilling, develop the Leadership Acceleration Program (LAP) for apprenticeships and establish the Business Incubation Program (BIP), which is focused on providing expertise and resources to African Americans entering the spirits industry as entrepreneurs. Click here to read that story.

8. Moore County deputy and subject exchange fire | Officer involved shootings are a rarity in Moore County, but in May a Moore County Sheriff’s Deputy and a suicidal subject exchanged fire at a home on Powell Hollow Road. The subject made a full recovery and no charges were filed in the standard TBI investigation that followed. Click here to read that story.

7. Barrel Tax issue fails … again | In 2012, Moore County voters voted down an attempt to levy a separate tax on Jack Daniel’s Distillery barrels. At the time, opponents of the ballot measure argued that it would be an “industry killer” and in 2018 the Tennessee Legislature showed their agreement by passing HB 2038 and SB 2076, bills that clarified that “Tennessee whiskey barrels [should] remain exempt from property tax.” Despite those facts, the issue seems to pop up in Lynchburg every few years. That’s exactly what happened in May when Metro Council member Wayne Hawkins made a presentation asking his fellow council members to approve money to legally revisit the issue. Much discussion ensued, but ultimately the motion failed by a 9-3 margin. Click here to read that story.

6. Kip Moore, Josh Turner, and Justin Moore headlines Lynchburg Music Fest | Lots of local events got cancelled or rescheduled in 2020 but with a brand new sprawling farm venue located in rural Mulberry and plenty of room to social distance, the Lynchburg Music Festival kept their October 4 date and snagged some outstanding acts. In August, they announced that Long Black Train crooner Josh Turner and two Academy of Country Music’s New Artists of the Year Kip Moore and Justin Moore (no relation) would headline. Click here to read that story.

5. Chris Fletcher replaces Jeff Arnett as Jack Daniel Master Distiller | In September, Jeff Arnett shocked Lynchburg and much of the whiskey-making world by announcing his departure from one of the best industry jobs in the world, Jack Daniel Master Distiller. Click here to read that story. Nearly a month later, the distillery announced that the Assistant Master Distiller and grandson of former Master Distiller Frank Bobo, Chris Fletcher, would take over the top spot. Click here to read that story.

4. Kris White replaces Jason Dobbs as MCHS Raider football head coach | In May, Raider Head Football Coach Jason Dobbs announced he was resigning his position at MCHS to pursue an opportunity at Oakland High School in Murfreesboro. Click here to read that story. Later that month, Director of School Chad Moorehead announced that an old coach would be the new head coach, Kris White. He would lead the Raiders to a 10-1 regular season and a playoff run. Click here to read that story.

3. Monster Broadband wins $1.1 million fiber grant | As the COVID 19 situation worsened, more and more Moore County residents depended on the Internet to work, attend classes, and connect online. In August, a local Internet company, Monster Broadband, applied for an were awarded a $1.1 million grant through the state’s Coronavirus Relief Fund that added 26 new miles of fiber Internet into our tiny county. In October, Metro Moore County applied for funding that added two more roads, Goodbranch and Goosebranch, to Monster’s fiber expansion. Click here to read that story.

2. Raiders make the playoffs; Parker named Mr. Football finalist | After their 10-1 regular season, the Moore County Raiders made a playoff run with not one but two Mr. Football nominees on their roster: Kaden White and Kyler Parker. On November 6, they beat the Wayne County Wildcats 49-14 and then moved passed Huntington on November 13 by a score of 42-22. Moore County ended their season on November 20 with a 38-29 loss to Fayetteville City, who would move on to win their first ever TSSAA Class 1A Football Championship with a 20-14 win over South Pittsburg. Raider QB Kyler Parker would go on to be named as one of the three Class A Mr. Football finalist. Hunter Frame of South Pittsburg ultimately won the award on December 8.

1. COVID-19 virus hits Moore County | Lynchburg may exist inside the second smallest of Tennessee’s 95 counties but the COVID-19 global pandemic created as many headlines here as in bigger cities. By March, confirmed cases of the virus started popping up throughout southern, middle Tennessee including as close as Bedford, Coffee, Franklin, Grundy, and Lincoln counties. On April 29, the Lynchburg Nursing Center confirmed its first case – the fourth in the county. As of the last day of 2020, Moore County has experienced 701 total cases of COVID-19 and lost six friends and neighbors to the virus. •

{The Lynchburg Times is an independently owned and operated newspaper that publishes new stories every morning. Covering Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

Donald Ray Evans of Lois dies at 74

Donald Ray Evans of the Lois and Mulberry communities died at Vanderbilt Medical Center on Thursday, December 24 at the age of 74. A native of Moore County, Donald Ray was born on February 10, 1946 as the son of the late Claude and Mary Grammer Evans. He served in the U.S. Marine Corps. in the Vietnam War and was awarded the Purple Heart Medal.

Donald Ray Evans

According to his family, Donald Ray will be remembered not only as a serviceman, but as a gentleman who had a gentle touch a tender heart. “He also had a heart for animals and was kind to everyone, giving more than he ever took. He loved his God and served him daily, knowing where his ultimate home was. His wife, Dolly, was the love of his life. He loved his children and grandchildren dearly, raising his children with a firm hand, but also with love. He was their “Mr. Fix-it” and was always there to console his children when they needed a pick-me-up. He taught his girls about cars, how to work, and the importance of being independent. He wanted them to always know that there was nothing that they couldn’t do. He had a wonderful sense of humor and when he smiled, it was always genuine. Mr. Evans kept the community entertained by the sound of racing engines, race cars, and motorcycles. He enjoyed being outside on his tractor and in the woods,” according to the family.

His loving wife of nearly 50 years, Dolly Evans, survives him along with his daughters: Angela Fay Weddington (Jason) of Mulberry and Pamela Sue Bryson (Stewart) of Marietta; his sister, Wanda Fay Evans of Lynchburg; aunt, Margie Grammer of Tullahoma; as well as his grandchildren, Allyssa Hope Hannah (Zachary) of Charity, Faith Evans Weddington of Mulberry and fiancé, Tyler Simmons of Lincoln County, William West Bryson of Marietta, Oliver Stewart Bryson of Marietta. He is also survived by good friends, Larry and Nancy Hatfield of Mulberry and Gerald and Patty Hinkle of Lynchburg.

Graveside services for the family will be held at Lois Cemetery on Saturday, January 2 at 1 p.m. In lieu of flowers, the family asks that donations be made to Friends of Animals Rescue and Adoption Center at P.O. Box 8015, Lynchburg, TN 37352. •

{Editor’s Note: The Lynchburg Times publishes obituaries of Moore County residents and individuals whose immediate family live in Moore County at no cost to the family. We consider it a public service important for future genealogical research. Submit your information to editor@lynchburg-times.com.}

Metro Utilities offices go remote

Due to a COVID-19 exposure, Metro Utilities officials say all office staff will work remotely until further notice. (File Photo)

LOCAL NEWS — According to officials at the Metro Utilities Department, the MUD office located at 705 Fayetteville Highway will be going 100 percent remote on Tuesday due to a COVID-19 exposure and others reasons.

“To minimize exposure because of the rising COVID cases, the office staff at Metro Utility Department will be closing the office and working remotely. Customer payments will be retrieved from the night deposit slot. As released earlier in the month, there will not be late fees charged for December billing as some customers still have not received their bill.” 

Effective immediately, the office staff will work from home and can still be reached by phone to answer questions, set up new service, and report a water emergency. Maintenance employees will continue to work in the field without interruption. Operators at both the Metro Water Plant located on the Lynchburg Highway and at the Metro Sewer Plant off Highway 129 will continue operate normally.

“We need to do what we can to keep everyone healthy and the office up and running,” said MUD officials. “This means working at home until further notice. Hold times may be a little longer than normal due to staff working remotely. If customers would prefer to leave a message, they can do so and someone will call them back as soon as possible.”

Drive thru payments will no longer be available without onsite staff but MUD customers may make payments via mail, automatic bank draft, payment drop-off, or online on the MUD website through the payment portal. Customers will need their account number and last four digits of their phone number in order to access their online account.

MUD staff says that they plans to re-evaluate the situation on January 19, the day that Governor Bill Lee’s latest Executive Order expires. That EO encourages all those Tennesseans who can to work from home to do so. To view the full executive order, click here.

For more information, contact MUD officials at 931-759-4297, visit their website, or follow their Facebook page. •

{The Lynchburg Times is an independently owned and operated newspaper that publishes new stories every morning. Covering Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

MCHS Athletic Director: Immediate households can attend Raiders games, everyone should tune in remotely

LOCAL NEWS — In a move that’s been coming for week, Moore County High School Athletic Director Josh Deal announced on Monday that the school would be following the TSSAA attendance recommendations for all upcoming basketball games and wrestling matches effective immediately. This mean that only players and their immediate families (those that also live in the same household) may attend both home and away games. The TSSAA guidelines also prevents bands, pep bands, cheerleaders, and dance teams from attending athletic contests.

“We hate that it has come to this, but TSSAA is attempting to allow these kids to have a season,” Deal stated via the Moore County Athletics Facebook page.

The move is a trickle down from Governor Bill Lee’s Executive Order No. the 70 issued on December 20, which stated that due to a significant increase in the incidences of COVID-19 infections in Tennessee, the state would restrict who may attend interscholastic athletic practices and contest until January 19, 2021.

Moore County administrators told The Lynchburg Times that they understood fan frustration but they were simply enforcing the rules put in place on the state level.

“Many people have questions right now about athletics, Winterfest, beauty pageants, and other events that normally occur this time of year.  Unfortunately, we do not have answers at this time,” said Director of Schools Chad Moorehead. “Our main priority at this point is the health and well being of our students, staff, and community.  Please continue to be patient as we work to navigate this difficult situation.”

Raider fans can still watch events remotely thanks to the Moore County High School student broadcasting team. Locals can tune into the Moore County Sports Network broadcast through the NFHS Network. There is a subscription cost but fan can buy a one time game pass for $9 each – just a little more than a ticket to a home Raider game. Fifty percent of the virtual ticket price goes to the student broadcasting team.

Subscriptions also give locals access to other school’s live sporting events and previous Raider events through the On Demand feature, according to MCSN teacher sponsor Jonah Deal. Deal says that live streaming on Facebook or YouTube isn’t feasible because of the TSSAA licensing fees.

For more information about the student broadcasting team, visit http://www.mcraiders.net. To learn more about the NFHS Network, click here. •

{The Lynchburg Times is the only independently owned and operated newspaper in Lynchburg, Tennessee. We cover Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

Give blood at the Moore County Battle of the Badges

Members of the Metro Fire Department and Metro Sheriff’s Department challenge Moore County citizens to show their big hearts on January 25 by giving blood at the Moore County Battle of the Badges Blood Drive. (File Photo)

EVENTS — Blood supplies across Tennessee, and much of the U.S., are at dangerously low levels due to recent severe weather and the holidays.  With that in mind, Lynchburg Mayor Bonnie Lewis issued a challenge to our local fire department and sheriff’s department to see which department can recruit the most eligible blood donors in the community during the annual Blood Assurance Moore County Battle of the Badges.

Metro Moore Volunteer Fire Department and Metro Moore County Sheriff’s Department will co-host a blood drive on Monday, January 25 from 12-5 p.m. at the Moore County Volunteer Fire Department located at 301 Majors Boulevard.

Fire Chief Mark Neal reminds locals that a single blood donation can support three or more medical needs in an area hospital.

“This is for anyone that would like to help a good cause,” said LES SRO Mike Rainey. “It would ne great to show how our small community can show up in large numbers.”

So, whether you are Team Sheriff’s Department or Team Fire Department, roll up you sleeves and help area blood banks. Blood Assurance encourages all donors to eat a good meal, drink plenty of water, and avoid energy drinks prior to making a donation.

All donors must be 18 years or older. Chief Neal says those who are short on time can visit the website to make an appointment for quicker turn around. For more information, visit the blood drive’s website by clicking here. •

{The Lynchburg Times is an independently owned and operated newspaper that publishes new stories every morning. Covering Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

AT&T says no recovery timeframe for Internet back online due to building damage and investigation

AT&T officials says Internet services in the state, including Moore County’s Monster Broadband, can not be restored until commercial power can be turned back on in the damaged data center. (File Photo)

STATE NEWS — Based on information given both through a company press release and the 1 p.m. press conference, there is currently “no recovery timeframe in hand” for an all clear on AT&T-fed Internet in Tennessee as well as parts of Kentucky and northern Alabama. This includes Moore County’s Monster Broadband.

According to AT&T mechanical engineers, they confirmed that there is roughly three feet of water in the basement of the data center from overnight efforts to fight a fire in the building. That water has the potential to do damage to mechanical equipment in the area. Also, that standing water is preventing commercial power from being restored, which is preventing restoration of Internet services.

Both AT&T and TEMA have generators on site, which has restored some 3G cellular services, but commercial power will need to be restored to get Internet back online. That power remains shut off near the area of the explosion so that FBI and ATF can safely continue their investigation.

U.S. Attorney for the Middle District of Tennessee, Don Cochran said his office had received over 500 tips and leads since Friday and investigators were following up on all of them.

Cochran stated that the area near the AT&T data center was like a giant jigsaw puzzle filled with clues.

He also stated that over 250 FBI agents were on the ground in Nashville and profilers at Quantico were working to help narrow the manhunt.

“We ask that you be patient,” said Metro Nashville Police Department Chief John Drake.

No one at the 1 p.m. press conference named any suspect or persons of interest in the bombing. CBS News released the name of Anthony Quinn Warner, age 63, of Nashville as a person of interest in the bombing earlier today. Click here for that link. •

{The Lynchburg Times is the only independently owned and operated newspaper in Lynchburg, Tennessee. We cover Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}