Virtual talent competition seeks video auditions

Country hit maker and Grand Ole Opry member Craig Morgan will share his music industry insights and experiences with the 2020 Path to Fame Virtual Talent Competition grand champion. {Photo Credit: Nate Griffin}

You’ve heard of talent competition shows like The Voice, American Idol, and America’s Got Talent right? What if we told you that the folks at Pigeon Forge did their very own version, Path to Fame, and that auditions will be coming to two towns less than an hour’s drive from Lynchburg?

Path to Fame 2020 will be the third consecutive year for the Tennessee-based talent scout … and this year due to COVID-19, there will be a virtual twist. In previous years, Path To Fame traveled with a team of talent scouts to various markets in the Southeast. To accommodate restrictions and venue closings due to COVID-19, the talent competition has been re-engineered to accommodate video auditions. 

“We know that performers were affected by the economic shutdown and operating restrictions necessary to combat the spread of COVID-19,” said Pigeon Forge Executive Director of Tourism Leon Downey. “Pigeon Forge’s theater community would like to help those performers, along with other talented folks, by bringing the Path To Fame Virtual Talent Competition online for 2020. We hope easy access to the competition will encourage performers to make a video and take advantage of this great career-building opportunity.”    

The grand champion will claim a prize package that includes tools to help launch the winner’s own path to fame, including a virtual career consultation with country star Craig Morgan. 

Anyone over the age of 18 who fits the search criteria can audition but officials have designated four hometown markets for this year’s auditions:  Asheville, North Carolina, Chattanooga, Tennessee, Huntsville, Alabama, and Atlanta, Georgia.

Contestants may showcase their talent in one of four categories: vocalist, instrumentalist, comedian and specialty act. Individuals and groups of five or fewer can may compete. All contestants must register and submit an audition video following the contest rules and regulations to be eligible to win.

Judges will select four finalists to represent each of the hometown markets. The 16 finalists will compete for the grand champion title and the prize package that includes 12 monthly consultations with a Nashville-based talent executive and a virtual meeting with Broken Bow Records country music star Craig Morgan. 

Morgan possess strong ties to Pigeon Forge. The Tennessee native and Grand Old Opry member served as master of ceremonies at the award-winning Country Tonite show before finding success with country hits like That’s What I Love About Sunday, Almost Home, and Redneck Yacht Club. Morgan will share his music industry insights and experiences with the 2020 Path to Fame Virtual Talent Competition grand champion.


“We’re thrilled to work with Craig Morgan this year in part because he also began his own ‘path to fame’ in Pigeon Forge,” said Downey added. “Given the success of Path to Fame Talent Competition over the past two years, we’re eager to discover more talent this year, and we hope the virtual nature of this year’s contest will encourage even more people to audition.”

The grand champion prize package is comprised of career-building tools, including a one-year mentorship with Nashville-based talent executive John Alexander who discovered Kelsea Ballerini and spent more than a decade at Great American Country television network. Alexander will assist in establishing consultations and industry meetings for the grand champion. Additionally, the winner will perform in Pigeon Forge during a complimentary return trip and receive assets and experiences to advance his or her career. 

Pigeon Forge helped launch the careers of Janelle Arthur, Carly Pearce, and Mandy Barnett. For more information and details to enter are available PFFame.com. •

{The Lynchburg Times is an independently owned and operated newspaper that publishes new stories every morning. Covering Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

Motlow, TCAT partner to make student transfers easier

Motlow Murfreesboro Vice President Dr. Echelle Eady, TCAT Murfreesboro President Dr. Carol Puryear, and Motlow State President Dr. Michael Torrence sign an articulation agreement that will make student tranfers easier. {Photo Provided}

LOCAL NEWS — Motlow State Community College and Tennessee College of Applied Technology (TCAT) –Murfreesboro recently announced a partnership that will create a smooth transfer process for students studying nursing, cyber defense, business office, and mechatronics.

The articulation agreement between the schools will facilitate the transfer of TCAT – Murfreesboro students to Motlow; provide specific advisement for TCAT – Murfreesboro students who intend to transfer to Motlow; and, encourage academic and administrative coordination between the institutions. Transfer students from TCAT – Murfreesboro to Motlow may also receive credit for prior learning and certifications.

“This partnership provides expanded opportunities for students in Rutherford County and surrounding areas,” said Scott Shasteen, Motlow communications director. “Motlow nursing, cyber defense, business office, and mechatronics graduates enjoy high placement rates in high-demand, high-wage occupations.”

In particular TCAT – Murfreesbor LPN graduates will able to more easily transition into the Motlow LPN-RN program.

Students wishing to transfer credits to Motlow must meet the admissions requirements, and Motlow reserves the right to reject any student’s admission in accordance with its standard policies and procedures. Transfer students from TCAT-Murfreesboro will provide an official transcript of completed courses to Motlow.

For more information, visit the Motlow College website by clicking here. •

{The Lynchburg Times is an independently owned and operated newspaper that publishes new stories every morning. Covering Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

Barn Dance in Wiseman Park benefits local non-profit

Horse Play Inc. provides therapeutic riding opportunities for local special needs kids. They will host a fund raiding barn dance on September 19 in Lynchburg. {Lynchburg Times graphic}

EVENTS — Local non-profit Horse Play Inc plans their second annual barn dance fund raiser – Swing and Sway for Horse Play – for Saturday, September 19 at Moorehead Pavilion inside Wiseman Park.

Tullahoma’s South Jackson Street Band will play live music. The event will also feature a live auction, door prize drawing, and concessions. According to event organizers, the dance will practice social distancing protocols and follow CDC guidelines throughout the event.

Horse Play is a local 501(c)3 non-profit that provides recreational horseback riding opportunities for children with mental or physical challenges. It’s run by a board of directors as well as a dedicated team of volunteers, medical professionals, and horse enthusiasts. Their stable of eight horses play a vital role in the well being of many Moore County special needs kids. Horse Play operates under the Professional Association of Therapeutic Horsemanship International (PATH).

Tickets are currently on sale and all proceeds benefit the non-profit. Single tickets are $15 and couples tickets are $25. Children 10 and under will be admitted free. You may also reserve of table for eight people for $125 donation. The event takes place from 6 to 9:30 p.m.

To purchase tickets in advance visit their website and click on the “Give” tab and you will be redirected to the Horse Play Giving Fund PayPal page. Tickets will also be available at the door. For more information, contact Loretta Christian at 931-434-1291, Jean Kelly at 931-247-5292, or Patsy Freeman at 931-581-1626. •

{The Lynchburg Times is an independently owned and operated newspaper that publishes new stories every morning. Covering Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

Raiders ranked #6 by Associated Press

Prior to the 2020 season kick off, practically no one was paying attention to Class 1A Region 5 Moore County. Instead, all eyes were on traditional heavy weights like Cornersville and South Pittsburg.

When the new Associated Press (AP) ranking came out on Monday, all that changed. The Raiders are now ranked number six in high school football Class 1A teams.

The Associated Press’ Top 10 teams in each of TSSAA’s Division 1 school are selected by Tennessee AP-member sportswriters and broadcasters and are updated each Monday.

Other ranked teams in Class 1A were: 1. South Pittsburgh 2. Lake County 3. Huntingdon 4. Copper Basin 5. Fayetteville 7. Coalfield 8. Cornersville 9. Greenfield 10. Monterey and Gordonsville (tied).

One interesting note, Moore County beat number eight Cornersville last Friday night 32-23. (Read our full coverage of that game by clicking here.) They travel again this week to take on the Forrest Rockets on Friday. (Read our preview of that game by clicking here.)

The game will kick off in Chapel Hill at 7 p.m. For those who plan to travel, the GPS address is 310 North Horton Parkway, Chapel Hill TN 37034. If you can’t travel to the game, it will be broadcast live on Raider Country 105.1 and 95.5 FM, on the NFHS Network, or The Lynchburg Times will post live score updates on our Facebook page. •

{The Lynchburg Times is an independently owned and operated newspaper that publishes new stories every morning. Covering Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

As number of dumped pets rises, local shelter needs donations and fosters

COVID-19 is causing a spike in dumped and abandoned pets in Moore County. Lynchburg Friends of Animals Rescue and Adoption Center needs your help to keep them safe and get them the medical care they need. {File Photo}

During the COVID-19 pandemic, local shelters across the country report a spike in dumped and abandoned pets.

One needs to only read Moore County social media posts from the past week to know it’s true. On August 31, a local found a boxer mix on Turkey Creek Run. Four days later, a litter of eight puppies was found in a ditch on Goosebranch Road. Later that same day, a mother and her four puppies were found less than a mile away. A day later, a local found two more pups on Nolen Road. Just yesterday, another set of dogs were discovered around Pleasant Hill Methodist Church.

What do they all have in common? The Lynchburg Friends of Animals and Rescue and Adoption Center will try to care for all of them. It’s an tough job during “precedented” times but one that’s becoming overwhelming during the pandemic. Four of the puppies found last week require treatment for PARVO.

“We have to hospitalize them with a veterinary hospital leaving us with an estimated $2400 for vet care and hospitalization of all four pups,” said LFoA Director Brandi Harrell. “That was the cheapest I found in such short notice. These babies need our help.”

Moore County does not offer animal control as a county service. Without intervention from a caring, local shelter animals like these are destined for heartbreak, trauma, and often death. That’s where Lynchburg Friends of Animals Rescue and Adoption Center comes in. And you can help. Supplies like dog food, cat food, litter, and puppy pads can be dropped off at the shelter located at 1980 Fayetteville Highway. A full wish list of needs can be found by clicking this link.

Harrell also says that the shelter desperately needs fosters to give vulnerable animals off local roads. Without fosters and with a full shelter, LFoA might need to turn animals away. She says the more fosters, the more lives they can save. LFoA pays for all vet bills, food, as well as related supplies.

You can also make a donation via PayPal through a link on their website.

If you’d like to help with the medical care for the four puppies battling PARVO, donations can be made at the vet clinics currently providing care: All Creature Veterinary Clinics in Tullahoma (931-455-6723) or Manchester (931-723-0551). •

{The Lynchburg Times is an independently owned and operated newspaper that publishes new stories every morning. Covering Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

State announces new COVID mental health helpline for Moore County

The state recently announced a COVID-19 Crisis Helpline for Moore and 20 other Middle Tennessee counties. Call 888-460-4351 if you need to talk to someone. It’s free and confidential. {File Photo}

A COVID-related illness or death of a loved one, the isolation of social distancing, unemployment, the stress of working from home, remote learning … it’s a lot. According to a recent East Tennessee State University poll more than half of Tennesseans reported feeling nervous, anxious, or on edge in the week before the poll.  More than two in five respondents reported feeling depressed (43.4%) and lonely (42.8%).

But help is available for those who reach out.

The Tennessee Department of Health recently announced a new mental health tool for those suffering from mental health stressors during the COVID-19 pandemic. Moore County will be one of 21 counties in Middle Tennessee supported by the Tennessee Recovery Project’s COVID-19 helpline at 888-460-4351.

The new helpline will also serve Bedford, Cheatham, Coffee, Davidson, Dickson, Franklin, Giles, Hickman, Humphreys, Lawrence, Lewis, Lincoln, Marshall, Maury, Montgomery, Perry, Robertson, Stewart, and Wayne counties.

A volunteer staff will answer the new helpline Monday through Friday from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. and Saturdays from 8 a.m. to 12 p.m. It’s available to anyone struggling with emotional stressors due to the pandemic. Staff will connect callers with local resource that can help.

“There are a lot of people out there, dealing with stress, anxiety, fear, and depression, who are hurting right now.  We want people to know that it’s OK to not feel OK right now and that help is available, and thanks to this grant, the department and our community providers will be able to help more people,” said TDMHSAS Commissioner Marie Williams, LCSW.  “We are grateful to our federal partners for this funding, and the department is committed to leveraging all available resources to support the needs of Tennesseans and the community providers who serve them.”

Federal grant dollars fund the new helpline through the Federal Emergency Management Agency and in partnership with Centerstone, the Tennessee Recovery Project, the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), and the Tennessee Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services. It’s part of a larger grant that seeks to offer crisis counseling in all 95 Tennessee counties.

For more information, visit the Tennessee Recovery Project Disaster Crisis Counseling Program’s Facebook page by clicking here. •

{The Lynchburg Times is an independently owned and operated newspaper that publishes new stories every morning. Covering Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

5 Things to Do This Weekend

A hike past Adams Falls, an art show on the picturesque Monte Sano Mountain, and a whiskey tasting at a charming Winchester distillery … yeah there are lot of safe, small venue, socially distanced things to do this weekend. {File Photos}

We get it. Everyone grows weary of being stuck inside. As fall approaches, there are lots of outdoor or small venue events happening in southern, middle Tennessee that present an opportunity to safely get out and explore. So mask up, grab the hand sanitizer, stay six feet apart, wash your hands, and enjoy a little socially-distanced fun.

Hike in Tullahoma — Summer is winding down and with the first day of fall right around the corner, locals better grab all those opportunities to explore outside. On Sunday, you can explore the Short Springs, Adam Falls area with Tennessee State Naturalist Randy Hedgepath. The guided 2.5 mile hike will begin and end at the parking lot on Short Springs Road. Hikers will enjoy the moderate Adam’s Falls Trail past Machine Falls while enjoying gorgeous flora and fauna of the South Cumberland along the way. This hike will be limited to 12 people and you can sign up by calling 931-455-1121. Masks are recommended. For more information, click here.

Antique Tractor Show in Eagleville — If you are heading to the Moore County versus Forrest game on Friday anyways and you happen to have a little man who is all about tractors, leave a little early and stop by the Pioneer Days Antique Tractor Show on the way. Hosted by the Tennessee Valley Pioneer Power Association, and features lots of makes and models of antique tractors, trucks, cars, lawn tractors, and other gas powered engines. The free event takes place on Friday and Saturday. For more information, click here.

Art Show in Huntsville — It’s been an end of summer tradition on Monte Sano Mountain for two decades, and it will happen in 2020 with a few social distancing measure in place to keep everyone safe. The Monte Sano Art Festival kicks off on Saturday at 9 a.m. and will feature over 100 local and regional artists as well as area food trucks. Attendees must wear a mask. For more information, click here.

Whiskey Tasting in Winchester — There’s a charming little distillery located right off the historic Winchester Square call Branchwater. Master Distiller Bud Kelley makes some fabulous (and potent) southern, middle moonshine there. On Thursday, they’ll host a Ladies Night. Local gals are invited to come from 3-7 p.m. and taste some of what they have to offer including their new frozen drinks. For more information, click here.

Food Trucks at Beans Creek Winery — A local winery is great. A local winery with a food truck is outstanding. On Saturday Mark’s Specialty Seafood will return to Bean’s Creek Winery in Manchester for both lunch and dinner. Enjoy a refreshing wine slushy as well as seafood favorites like fried scallops, conch fritters, lobster roll, catfish fingers, and more. For more information, click here.

{The Lynchburg Times is an independently owned and operated newspaper that publishes new stories every morning. Covering Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

Raiders travel to Chapel Hill to face off with Rockets on Friday

CHAPEL HILL — Fresh off a clutch 33-23 win against the Bulldog in Cornersville last Friday, the Moore County High School Raiders (3-0) travel to Chapel Hill this week to take on Forrest. The Rockets blanked East Robertson at home in game one and lost in Portland 20-14 the following week. Last Friday, they beat Eagleville at home 19-7.

After an electric win over Cornersville, the Raiders must stay focused and avoid the worst of all football curses this Friday in Forrest … the let down game.

Moore County hasn’t beaten Forrest since 2012. In fact, the last four games — going back to 2014 — Forrest outscored the Raiders by a total of 95-14.

This year, however, Moore County’s not just a one trick pony. In fact, 2019’s lead running back, Tyler Smith, rushed for a total of just 222 yards through three games. He’s not having an off year. The Raider are just spreading the ball around.

Raider QB one Kyler Parker is also making smart decisions and if the hand off or pass isn’t there … he’s as hard scrabble a runner as any of the Moore County backs. Add to those two weapons, receivers Dawson White, Brayden Cashion, Kaden White, and Dylan Scruggs and well, the Raider offense is harder to defend.

Pre-season, the Rockets were rumored to be the best team in Region 5A with an a eye on the top spot. They boast a rock solid defense and enough play makers to keep the Raiders on their toes through four quarters. This road game could just come down to who wants it more.

The buzz around Moore County’s 2020 team under Coach Kris White is starting to spread. They are the only undefeated team left in Region 5A and Forrest will be gunning for them.

The game will kick off in Chapel Hill at 7 p.m. For those who plan to travel, the GPS address is 310 North Horton Parkway, Chapel Hill TN 37034. If you can’t travel to the game, it will be broadcast live on Raider Country 105.1 and 95.5 FM, on the NFHS Network, or The Lynchburg Times will post live score updates on our Facebook page. •

{The Lynchburg Times is an independently owned and operated newspaper that publishes new stories every morning. Covering Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

Raiders dominate Cornersville for first conference win

Raiders Kaden White (#20) and Isaiah Petty (#81) get ready to face off against Cornersville on Friday night. {Photo Credit: Riley Corder for the Moore County Sports Network}

CORNERSVILLE — An away game in an intimating stadium with a loud home field advantage against the number two Class A team in the state … one the Raiders had not beaten in the past four consecutive years. After two not difficult wins against Cascade and Community, it felt like the first real test for Head Coach Kris White and his 15 seniors deep 2020 Raiders.

But the Raiders had faced off against the Cornersville Bulldog with high expectations before and come up short.

In 2016, the Bulldogs won 39-15 in Cornersville. In 2017, the Raiders suffered a crushing 42-0 loss at home. In 2018, it was much of the same with Bulldogs blanking the Raiders 39-0. Last year, the Bulldogs marched into Raider Stadium with a 0-2 record and Moore County could just taste the upset. After leading for much of the game, the Raiders fell in the final quarter.

But these are not those Raiders.

As Moore County fans travelled the 51 minute drive west to Cornersville on Friday, they wondered could this be the year that David slays the Goliath.

Moore County hits the gas in the first half

Mike Tyson once famously said, “Everyone has a plan until they get punched in the mouth.” The loud home crowd, the homemade noise makers, the air horn, the fireworks, the number two hype … all that didn’t matter against a smart, well-coached, deep-benched Raider team filled with play makers who came out swinging.

Moore County scored quick and scored often in the first half. The Raiders won the coin toss and in a gutsy move, elected to receive. It took them exactly six plays to score when QB Kyler Parker connected with Kaden White on a 44 yard pass for Moore County’s first six points. Chase Bradford’s PAT sailed through the uprights to give the Raiders the extra point. With nine minutes still to play in the first quarter, the Raiders led the Bulldogs 7-0.

After the score, many wondered: how will the Raider defense respond? By playing lights out, bend-but-don’t-break football … that’s how.

The Bulldogs managed several successful runs for chunk yardage and a long bomb to their tight end to get into the Raider red zone. On first and 10 short of the goal, Cornersville junior running back Cason Warner got stacked up by the Raider line for a meager one yard gain. On second and nine, the Raiders forced the Cornersville QB Jackson Farler to fumble. The Bulldogs recovered but for a loss. As a clearly fired up Raider defense lined up on third and eight, the hurried Bulldog QB passed late and it fell incomplete. Cornersville settled for a field goal.

On the very next Raider play, QB Parker called his own number, broke a Bulldog tackle, and then beat the safety to the edge to score a quick six for Moore County. Bradford’s PAT was good. The Raiders took an early 14-3 lead with 4:30 left to play in the first quarter.

The first quarter ended with the Bulldogs driving at the goal line and in the first minutes of the second quarter, they finished what they started. At the two yard line, they squeaked past the Raider defender for their first touchdown but the point after fell short. With just over 10 minutes left in the first half, the Raiders continued to lead 14-9 … and that was as close as Cornersville would ever get.

On the next set of downs, Raider QB Parker went to work. He handed off to Tyler Smith for short yardage before connecting with Brayden Cashion on a 24 yard bomb. Two plays later, Smith finished what he started and found the end zone. The PAT missed the uprights. With 9:59 to play in their second quarter, the Raiders padded their lead, 20-9.

Cornersville and Moore County then exchanged punts. On the next Bulldog series, Cornersville found rhythm on offense completing a couple of first downs. Then on a crucial third and 12, Raider defender Donavin Pearson tackled the Cornersville receiver for a first down saving stop.

After three quick Raider scores, it felt like Coach White then decided to throw his offense into neutral. Instead of quick strike plays, the Raider managed a series of slow, methodical first downs to wind down the second quarter. In the final seconds of the first half, Parker connected with Dylan Scruggs with no time remaining for six more Raider points. The two point conversion failed and the Raiders headed into the halftime locker room, leading the Cornersville Bulldogs 26-9 … and they never looked back.

Moore County beat Cornersville in the first half with offense, and sealed that lead in the second half with defense.

Moore County’s Pearson set the tone with a huge tackle on the very first play of the second half. Then, Dawson White came out of the secondary to make a touchdown saving tackle to give the Bulldogs third and one. Two plays later the Bulldogs scored but not before they’d ticked over four valuable minutes off the second half clock. With 8:30 remaining in the third quarter, the Bulldogs pulled within 10.

On the next Raider series, Moore County looked to punt on third and eight, but the Bulldogs got called for a late hit — gifting the Raiders with a new set of downs and the momentum. They turned the ball over on downs over the next five plays, then Pearson clobbered the Cornersville running back and forced a fumble. Moore County recovered the ball on the Bulldog 30 yard line. Two plays later, Parker connected to Scruggs for his second receiving TD of the night. It was Raider QB Parker’s fourth touchdown pass of the night. Bradford’s PAT was good and the Raider increased their lead to 33-16.

With four fingers raised high, the Raiders concentrated on grinding out the clock in the final stanza. On their first offensive series, they pieced together six plays that resulted in zero points but managed nearly six minutes off the clock. Behind three scores, time was running out for the Bulldogs.

But this is where things had gone sideways for the Raiders the previous year. As the Bulldogs scored on a deep ball from Farler to to running back Alex Hillard, many Raider fans thought, oh no, here we go again.

But these aren’t those Raiders.

With less than three minutes to go and leading by 10, the Raiders refused to relax. They recovered an on-sides kick then played smart, clocked grinding offense. The Bulldog got the ball back with 40 seconds left but it was too late. At the end of four quarters, Moore County walked away with a 32-23 win over a top rival, their first road win, their first conference win, a 3-0 record, and a little swagger.

Offensively, Raider QB Parker managed an outstanding night with with 243 passing yards and four TD passes, another 95 rushing yards, as well as rushing touchdown. Dylan Scruggs caught two touchdown passes for 12 points while Kaden White and Tyler Smith managed a touchdown each. Raider kicker Chase Bradford went three of four.

Defensively, Donavin Pearson came to play with 13 total tackles (six solos tackles), a forced fumble, and several key stops. Tyler Smith managed 11 tackles and Kaden White another 10. Ryder Morey also defended a crucial pass.

The Raiders (3-0) will travel to Forrest (2-1) this Friday for their second of four consecutive away games. The Rockets beat East Robertson 10-0 in Cross Plains in game one, lost to in Portland 20-14 in game two, and won against conference foe Eagleville at home 19-7 this past Friday night.

The game will kick off in Chapel Hill at 7 p.m. For those who plan to travel, the GPS address is 310 North Horton Parkway, Chapel Hill TN 37034. If you can’t travel to the game, it will be broadcast live on Raider Country 105.1 and 95.5 FM, on the NFHS Network, or The Lynchburg Times will post live score updates on our Facebook page. •

{The Lynchburg Times is an independently owned and operated newspaper that publishes new stories every morning. Covering Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

Local Public Safety official explains change in COVID numbers reporting

Thanks to Moore County Public Safety Director Jason Deal, we now understand a little more about the confusing COVID-19 numbers reported by the state last Thursday. On Friday morning, he shared information supplied by the Tennessee Department of Health (TDH) about the changes.

In it, state health official explain that they are “improving” the data to reflect the evolving knowledge of the pandemic in our state.

Two major changes

The reports now reflect two major changes. One, active cases are now calculated differently — shortening the active period from 21 days to 10 days. This is resulting in a huge difference in the active case count. Before the change, the TDH numbers reflected 36 active cases in Moore County. After the change, there were just 15.

According to TDH, the case count reports will now include figures for “Inactive/Recovered” cases and will no longer include data for “Recovered” cases. “Inactive/Recovered” cases will include people who are 14 days or more beyond their illness onset date (or, for asymptomatic cases, their specimen collection date). This will more closely align with what is now understood about the infectious period of COVID-19, as recent data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention show most patients with COVID-19 are no longer infectious after 10 days. Previously, TDH considered a case recovered after a 21-day period.

Also, the 18 new cases that showed up last Thursday were in part a data correction. According to the state around 1,700 Tennessee cases were incorrectly assigned to the wrong counties based on patient-provide information. This could for example happen with someone living inside Moore County has a Tullahoma or Mulberry zip code, which is common.

“These cases will be corrected all at once, which will result in case counts changes for some counties,” the state said.

It’s a statement that tracks. On September 3, Moore County’s new COVID cases jumped 18 from 97 to 115. Since then, Moore County gained no new cases on September 4 and September 7, and one new case on September 5, September 6, and September 8.

The state now also provides county snapshots that show total cases, hospitalizations, deaths, and inactive or recovered cases on a county level. To view that daily report by county, click here. •

{The Lynchburg Times is an independently owned and operated newspaper that publishes new stories every morning. Covering Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}