What local parents need to know about the Tik Tok Benadryl Challenge

It seems harmless but too much of the over the counter medicine can lead to disastrous results. Parents should stay alert to the Tik Tok Benadryl Challenge, local health officials say. {File Photo}

You’d think they’d know better but sometimes teenage brains don’t work the way we think they should. Health officials warn parents about a another teen challenge that could end in disastrous result, the Tik Tok Benadryl Challenge.

The Benadryl Challege on the social media app started circulating several weeks ago. In this new “challenge,” teens encourage each other to take a hallucinating inducing dose of Benadryl while filming their experience.

It’s a dangerous gamble said local health officials. While taking too much of the popular allergy medication can induce hallucinations, it’s also easy to cross over into a medication overdose that can cause long term health effects like coma, or even death, health officials said. Other possible side effects are heart attack, seizure, and stroke, which can lead to permanent brain damage.

Health officials say if you suspect your teen has taken too much Benadryl the first thing you should do is call 9-1-1 because it’s not something that can be treated at home. It requires emergency care. It’s also important to proactively talk to teens about peer pressure and things like social media challenges. •

{The Lynchburg Times is the only independently owned and operated newspaper in Moore County … covering Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, the Lynchburg Music Fest, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

Reporting changes cause COVID data confusion

{Graphic Provided by the TN Department of Health}

STATE NEWS — Today the Tennessee Department of Health released new numbers based on changed modeling and it’s causing confusion with both state and county leaders as well as media across the state. The TDH is reminding residents to consider case trends over several days and not just the daily COVID counts as it makes adjustments to the way it monitors cases counts in the state.

On Thursday, the afternoon COVID numbers supplied by the state showed Moore County’s COVID-19 case count jumped by 18 from 97 to 115. That large fluctuation is just a correction to the numbers, state officials explain.

The Tennessee Department of Health made changes to the way COVID-19 data is reported today. For example, the state will no longer provide numbers for “recovered” cases and instead TDH will report the number of “Inactive/Recovered” cases. This will include cases who are 14 days or more beyond their illness onset date (or for asymptomatic individuals, their specimen collection date) and who are not deceased.

The state also reported the there are an approximate 1,700 cases for whom the county of residence needs to be corrected and that correction will happen all at once.

They also explained that occasionally a commercial laboratory will experience issues with sending results electronically. When this occurs and then gets resolved, TDH uploads a batch correction as quickly as possible but those corrections sometimes result in a large fluctuation in the daily numbers.

It’s unclear which (if any) of these changes caused the big jump in Moore County numbers.

It’s also important to note that Moore County’s active case count, according to the state, went from 36 to just 15 even though the total increase overnight was 18 cases. Clearly THD new reporting parameters is experiencing growing pains. The Lynchburg Times will continue to closely monitor these number over the next several days. •

{The Lynchburg Times is the only independently owned and operated newspaper in Moore County … covering Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, the Lynchburg Music Fest, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

Local book club “heads West” with September pick

The MCPL’s Brown Bag Book Club picked The Outcasts by Kathleen Kent as their September read. {Graphic Provided}

EVENTS — The Moore County Public Library Brown Bag Book Club picked a historical fiction for their September read. The local book club will read The Outcasts by Kathleen Kent this month.

The Dallas-based author has authored three best-selling, historical novels including The Heretic’s Daughter, The Traitor’s Wife, and this novel. She say she was inspired to write by reading a lot of Dickens, Poe and James Michener as a child.

Here’s the summary provided by the publisher:

It’s the 19th century on the Gulf Coast, a time of opportunity and lawlessness. After escaping the Texas brothel where she’d been a virtual prisoner, Lucinda Carter heads for Middle Bayou to meet her lover, who has a plan to make them both rich, chasing rumors of a pirate’s buried treasure.

Meanwhile, Nate Cannon, a young Texas policeman with a pure heart and a strong sense of justice, is on the hunt for a ruthless killer named McGill who has claimed the lives of men, women, and even children across the frontier.

Who – if anyone – will survive when their paths finally cross? As Lucinda and Nate’s stories converge, guns are drawn, debts are paid, and Kathleen Kent delivers an unforgettable portrait of a woman who will stop at nothing to make a new life for herself.

Normally the book club meets each Friday at 1 p.m. but there will be no meeting this Friday, September 11. The group ends and begins a new book on the last Friday of each month, so they will discuss The Outcasts on both September 18 and 25.

For more information, visit the Moore County Public Library’s Facebook page or call them at 931-759-7285. •

{The Lynchburg Times is the only independently owned and operated newspaper in Moore County … covering Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, the Lynchburg Music Fest, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

150,000 Purple Martins roost in downtown Nashville

Thousands of Purple Martin take over the trees near the Schermerhorn Symphony Center in downtown Nashville. {Photo Provided}

NASHVILLE — Due to COVID-19, the Nashville Symphony isn’t currently performing but there’s still a show happening nightly in downtown Nashville. An estimated 150,000 Purple Martins have taken up roost in the tourist district on the plaza outside the Schermerhorn Symphony Center … and they are causing quite the stir.

Purple Martin exist as a staple of Tennessee summers. They arrive each March, many to the same Martin house or box they’ve summered in for years, and leave each September to winter in South America and the Amazon. Each year, the global population of martins gather at just 350 roosting sites to prepare for their winter migration. {Editor’s Note: We reported on the Purple Martin’s return to Moore County earlier this year, to read that coverage, click here.}

Martin and humans enjoy a special relationship. They are North America’s largest swallow and in the East, they are nearly 100 percent dependent on human-made birdhouses for nesting areas. It’s a tradition started by this areas Native Americans who once hollowed out gourds to provide nesting spots. They can be seen in all 95 Tennessee counties but rarely in urban areas.

“Most of the purple martin population no longer nests in natural cavities. The species only continues to exist because individuals invest in and maintain purple martin houses,” said Tennessee Wildlife Federation (TWF) CEO Michael Butler. “When we saw what was happening downtown, it only seemed right to the Federation to share in the cost of their roosting site when it’s hurting a fellow nonprofit already impacted by the pandemic.”

If you’re looking for a fun, social distanced outing, the Purple Martins are putting on quite the show … but it will have a short run. They’re fueling up for a long flight back to South America. Be warned though as the birds swan dive and move in ballet like motion across the sky, they tend to poop … and 150,000 birds create a lot of it. It covers the sidewalks, the fountains, the windowsills, the Symphony Hall, the trees outside … and you might get dive bombed just looking up. You’ve been warned. The flock of birds are also loud and can be heard from blocks away.

Purple Martin are protected migratory songbirds by the Migratory Bird Treaty Act, so despite the fact that they’re wreaking havoc, the symphony is being patient if not chagrined hosts. They says once the Martins have traveled South, they’ll break out the press washers. Until then they’re enjoying a bit of entertainment … completely on brand for 2020.

In fact, they’ve partnered with the TWF to raise money to help with the unexpected clean up costs. Without income from performances, the symphony — like many non-profits during COVID — doesn’t have extra cash just lying around. The TWF will match donations dollar-for-dollar (up to $5,000). This partnership transformed the Purple Martin visit from a nuance to a once-in-a-lifetime performance.

“We are profoundly thankful to Tennessee Wildlife Federation, as well as to The Nature Conservancy and other conservation groups, for stepping in and helping raise funds to help us take care of the Schermerhorn,” said Nashville Symphony President and CEO Alan D. Valentine. “This will help us stay focused on the critical work of bringing back the musicians and staff who fulfill the Nashville Symphony’s mission of providing great music and education programs to the diverse population of Middle Tennessee.”

The TWF set a goal of raising $10,000 for the clean up and as of September 1, they’d raised $10,600.77. If you’d like to contribute to help with the clean up, click this link. •

{The Lynchburg Times is an independently owned and operated newspaper that publishes new stories every morning. Covering Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

Raiders down Vikings 41-8 on Senior Night

Senior running back Tyler Smith waits for the Community defense to line back up so he can get another shot at the ball. Smith had a big night on Thursday with three touchdown, a two point conversion, 97 rushing yards, six tackles, and an interception. {Photo Courtesy of the Moore County Sports Network}

SPORTS — In 2020, there is no normal, so a Senior Night on a Thursday during the second game of the season that gets lightening delayed in the first quarter? Why not?

Despite the chaos, Moore County snagged an impressive 41-8 win against the Community Vikings in Lynchburg on August 27. It was their second win under new Raider Head Coach Kris White. The Raiders beat Cascade 15-0 at home the previous week.

On Thursday, the Vikings came into the game a clear underdog despite the early season unknowns on the Moore County side of the ball. Community, on a four game losing streak, lost big to Cornersville at home the previous week in a 36-6 shellacking.

It was a trend that would continue.

Clicking offense and unyielding defense

In the first half, the boys in Columbia blue scored on every single posession while forcing the Vikings to either punt or turn the ball over on downs. The Raiders got on the scoreboard first when Tyler Smith and Donavin Pearson blasted through the Viking defensive line creating space for the QB draw. Kyler Parker shouldered his way into the end zone for six points with 9:34 remaining on the first quarter clock.

On Community’s first possession, Viking QB Dallas Grooms tried to get his offense moving with a quarterback keeper and short runs by senior running back, CJ Rivera to set up a third and two in Raider territory. The Raider D stopped Grooms run toss to Rivera short. Then in a gutsy first quarter gamble, Viking Head Coach Chris Grooms decided to go for it on fourth down. The Vikings lined up clearly attempting to pull the Raiders offside but the disciplined Moore County defensive line didn’t bite. After a time out, the Vikings still didn’t punt. Instead, QB Grooms handed it off to Rivera who got stuffed by 250 pound, eighth grade center Aydan Blair and the Vikings handed over the ball to Moore County on the Raider side of the field.

Apropos of Senior Night, on the next series senior QB Parker threw to senior wide receiver Kaden White for a completion, setting up senior fullback Tyler Smith, who broke two tackles and made them pay for it with another six points. Senior kicker Chase Bradford added the extra point to give the Raiders a 13-0 lead with 7:09 left in the first half.

The unyielding Raider defense just would not let up. On the next Vikings series, they allowed just three yards before forcing the punt. Kaden White ran the kick all the way to the Raider endzone but officials called the play back for an illegal block in the back. After backing up 15 yards, Parker hit Dylan Scruggs midfield for a first down. Then after a no gain play, Parker handed off to Smith who spun and stopped two yards short of the end zone. The duo seemed determined to add six more and after a hand off for a loss, Smith pushed his way forward for a Raider touchdown. Bradford’s PAT added one more to give the Raiders a 20-0 lead with 3:36 left in the first.

And then the lightening came

With 3:16 left to play in the first half the winds whipped on Doug Price Field and lightening threatening in the distance. In an abundance of caution and per TSSAA rules, officials sent both teams to the locker room.

The big question coming out of the 30 minute lightening delay: Did the “additional halftime” break the Raider momentum and give the Vikings a chance to regroup? After play resumed, Tyler Smith answered with a resounding “nope” as he snagged a Grooms to Rivera pass in the drizzling rain inside the Raider 15 yard line. Brayden Cashion, now in at QB, called his own number for positive yards setting up a pass to Joshua Parks for six more Raider points. This time the Raiders went for a successful two point conversion by Smith to give Moore County a 28-0 edge.

And then the rain came

Maybe it was the prolonged, soggy game. Maybe it was the 28-0 Raider lead. Regardless, things got chippy in the second quarter as it continued to rain misty drizzle and Raider points in Lynchburg.

On the first series, Cashion connected with J. Parks on a 10 yard pass to set up Dawson White for the running touchdown with just 33 seconds off the second quarter clock. Bradford’s point after connected to give the Raiders a quick 35-0 lead.

The next Viking series came with offsetting personal fouls and a fourth and 11 punt. Afterward, Parker returned as QB and managed a first down run to the 33 yard line with the quarterback draw. After a rare play for a loss, Moore County punted for the first time in the game. On the next series, the Raider D turned up the heat. The White brothers, freshman free safety Dawson and senior strong safety Kaden, put a stop to anything beyond 10 yards of the Viking line of scrimmage while the Raider defensive line shut down the middle. Then Cashion snagged an INT with 1:10 to go in the first half.

Parker then connected with Scruggs for a 48 yard pass to set up the QB keeper for the score. However, there was a Raider flag on the play and time expired before they could get a second shot at a first half score. The teams headed back into the locker room with Moore County blanking Community 35-0.

The second half kicked off with another gutsy but unsuccessful call by Vikings Head Coach Grooms. A Community onside kick only went four yards and the Raiders took over possession. Neither team scored in the third quarter.

On the Raiders first series of the fourth quarter, Smith ran to the edge on a first down and sprinted toward the Raider pylon only to be called short of the end zone.

“We really need a pylon camera,” one of the Raider announcers snarked over the live broadcast.

Undaunted by the one yard mark short of the goal line, on the next play, Smith lowered his shoulder and eeked into the end zone for his third and final TD of the night. The PAT fell flat and the Raiders led 41-0 with 7:30 left in the game.

On their next possession, Community avoided the shutout and scored their only points of the night. The game ended with a resounding 41-8 Raider win over Community. The Raiders advanced to 2-0 and the Vikings fell to 0-2.

It was a quality win for Coach White and his 15 seniors as well as an opportunity to get some younger Raiders some valuable playing time. Freshman Keller Morley, Logan Hegwood, Tanner Parks, Will Parker, Wes Clifton, and Alex Copeland all got their jerseys dirty in the second half as Coach White substituted heavily despite the fact that Community kept the majority of their starters in.

On offense, Tyler Smith led the Raiders with 97 all purpose yards. Joshua Parks and Kaden White led the receivers with 28 yards each. Smith led in rushing yards with Kyler Parker calling his own number for 64 more. Dylan Scruggs added another 53 yards. Quarterbacks Parker and Cashion shared playing time for 74 combined passing yards.

On defense, Donavin Pearson led with 10 tackles including five solo tackles. Hayden Carter and Smith added six tackles each.

The Raiders move on to their toughest game of the 2020 season this Friday in Cornersville. Both teams are still undefeated with Moore County snagging wins against Cascade and Community at home and Cornesville managing a road win in Unionville and a home win against Eagleville. Kick off will be at 7 p.m. If you can’t travel to the game, you can listen to Joe Abraham and Jonah Deal call the game of Raider Country 95.9 and 105.1 FM, over the web on the NFS Network, or The Lynchburg Times Facebook page will post live score updates. •

{The Lynchburg Times is the only independently owned and operated newspaper in Lynchburg. We cover Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

Lynchburg could see trickle down from Hurricane Laura

{Graphic Courtesy of the National Weather Service}

WEATHER — National Weather Service officials predict that Moore County could see some severe weather from Hurricane Laura as she makes her way northeast. The hurricane made landfall Wednesday night as a category 4 storm near Cameron, Louisiana with recorded winds near 150 mph. It left over 500,000 without power in Louisiana and another 126,000 without power in Texas.

Highest risk Friday afternoon

Locally, NWS officials in Huntsville predict the greatest threat of severe weather will come Friday afternoon. For this reason, many high school football games across southern, middle Tennessee – including the MCHS versus Community game – were moved up a day.

Friday afternoon and into Friday evening bands from Tropical Storm Laura will hit middle Tennessee with potential impacts ranging from heavy rainfall and flooding to downed trees with or without high winds due to saturated soil. The greatest threat will happen from 4-9 p.m. There’s also a smaller risk of severe thunderstorms and a few tornadoes. Expected rainfall will be around one to two inches.

Marginal risk continues onto to Saturday

The remnants of Tropical Storm Laura will continue toward the Ohio Valley on Saturday. Lingering heavy rain could fall in Lynchburg with gusty, damaging winds. According to NWS, a tornado or two cannot be ruled out, but the threat should diminish on Saturday. •

{The Lynchburg Times is the only independently owned and operated newspaper in Lynchburg. We cover Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

Raiders versus Community varsity game moved to Thursday

Thanks to Hurricane Laura who is currently swirling in the Gulf, this week’s middle school and high school schedules have changed. The MCMS Raider will not play this week. Their Thursday night game against Huntland has been cancelled and will be rescheduled for a later date. Instead, the MCHS Raiders will take on Community that night. The gates will open at 5:30 p.m. Senior Night festivities will happen at 6 p.m. and the Raiders will kick off against the Vikings at 7 p.m.

Raiders blank Cascade

Raiders snagged their first win under new Head Coach Kris White last Friday night earning a 15-0 shut out win against Cascade.

Kyler Parker led the Raiders with 109 all purpose yards. Both Brayden Cashion and Dylan Scruggs made it into the end zone for six points and Raider kicker Chase Bradford was one of two for the night.

Tyler Smith led the Raiders in rushing yards with 78 followed by Parker (39), Cashion (17), Dawson White and Scruggs (15) and Kaden White (3). Scruggs led in receiving yards with 45 followed closely by Cashion with 43. Other Raiders snagging passes were D. White (28) and K. White (19).

On defense, D. White, K. White, and Smith led with 11 total tackles followed by Donavin Pearson with 10. Seven of K. White’s tackles were solo tackles and he also snagged an interception. Ryder Morey, Hayden Carter, Cashion, Zac Carawan, and Joseph Trice contribute four tackles each; Will Harder, two tackles, and Noah Whitaker, Scruggs, and Tanner Parks got a tackle each.

Game two against Community

Cornersville handled Community in Unionville 36-6 last Friday. Sloppy play be the Viking combined with dogged third down and fourth down conversions by the Bulldogs found Community in a field position hole for most of the night. The Raiders will want to keep an eye on Viking QB Dallas Grooms and his favorite target McCade Miller on Thursday.

For those who can’t make it to the game, you can listen on Raider County 95.9 and 105.1 FM, on the NFS Network, or watch The Lynchburg Times Facebook page for score updates. •

{The Lynchburg Times is the only independently owned and operated newspaper in Lynchburg. We cover Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

Library: Virtual learners welcome on eLearning Wednesdays

Moore County students will experience their first eLearning Wednesday tomorrow and the Moore County Public Library wants locals to know they are here to help. {File Photo}

LYNCHBURG — eLearning Wednesday’s will kick off tomorrow and the Moore County Public Library (MCPL) wants you to know that they are here to help. On Wednesdays, the library will transform into an virtual learning help center.

Last Wednesday, Moore County Schools announced that all students would learn virtually each Wednesday in order to give teachers a mid week opportunity to catch up from the demands of dual teaching both in person and online as well as get students prepared should COVID force school closures. (Read our full coverage of that decision by clicking here. )

Library staff will provide paper, pencils, as well as tech support for those who feel unsure about the elearning process. Students should come with their passwords in hand as the library staff will not have independent access to this information. The MCLP WiFi is an open network that does not require a password. Parents must remain with their children at all times. Snacks will be allowed but not in carpeted areas.

The library will still follow its social distancing guidelines on eLearning Wednesdays and therefore, spots are limited. All seating will be on a first come, first served basis. Parents who wish to utilize the library on these days should call 931-759-7285 to reserve a spot. •

{The Lynchburg Times is the only independently owned and operated newspaper in Lynchburg. We cover Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

Raiders blank Cascade in season opener

The Raiders really wanted to give first year Coach Kris White his first W as the MCHS head coach and the boys in Columbia blue did just that with a shut out win in Lynchburg tonight over the Cascade Champions, 15-0.

With no preseason scrimmages, Raider fans knew the first couple of series might be a little bumpy and they were. Moore County fumbled on the third play from scrimmage to hand Cascade the ball.

The Champions didn’t do much with it — going a quick three and out and handing the ball over to the Raiders on downs.

With Raider QB Kyler Parker in control, Kaden White and Tyler Smith put together a first down before Parker completed a long pass to Brayden Cashion to put the Raiders on the board. Chase Bradford’s first PAT of the season connected to give the Raiders an early 7-0 lead with 6:43 remaining in the first.

Cascade managed a little momentum on the next series before Donavin Pearson got a big third and 10 stop. He forced a fumble but Cascade recovered only to punt on the next play.

On the next Raider series, first game missteps reared their head again. QB Parker put together a couple of long passes to Dawson White to get the Raiders third and goal. Moore County then fumbled the ball at the goal line with 20 seconds left in the first half.

One the next series, the Raiders crowded the end zone as Cascade played deep in their own territory and managed a safety to give them a 9-0 lead.

In the second quarter, the Raiders put together a first down effort with run plays by Tyler Smith and Dawson White before Parker hit a wide open Dylan Scruggs for a first down.

On the next play, a tipped pass found its way to Scrugg in the end zone to give the Raiders six more. With 9:59 remaining in the second quarter, the Raiders scored the final points of the night.

At the end of four, the Raiders snagged a home victory and its first W for Coach Kris White. The Raiders played disciplined football and clearly feel comfortable under their new head coach. Though the offensive sputtered in this first outing, the defense showed grit with smart tackles and never giving up on plays.

After the game, Coach White told The Times that he was really happy with the Raiders effort tonight.

“We knew we were gonna make mistakes and some things would be out of our control but the one thing we could control was effort. I felt like they did that,” he said.

The Raiders play at home again next Friday against Community. It will also be Senior Night. Kick off is at 7 p.m. •

Monster wins $1.1 million grant to expand fiber in Moore County

Monster will expand fiber in two segments. One will begin Hurricane Creek Road and move towards Cobb Hollow and the Smith Chapel area. The second phase will begin in Lois near Short Creek Road and make a loop on Tanyard and back around to Highway 50. {Art Provided}

Good news is coming for households struggling to get adequate Internet connections in the rural areas of Moore County. Monster Broadband – a local Internet Service Provider founded by two Moore County High School graduates – just received a $1.1 million grant to expand fiber coverage in Moore County.

“Our mission from the start was to get the highest Internet speeds possible to the folks living in rural area that tend to get forgotten by the larger providers. This grant will allow us to expand our fiber to hundreds of Moore County households,” co-owner Charles Johnston said.

Johnston and Steve Baker, two MCHS class of 1990 graduates, launched Monster Broadband in 2009. Last year they launched their first fiber network in the Ridgeville subdivision along Tims Ford Lake. Since then, they’ve brought fiber speeds of up to 250 megabytes per second to over 500 homes in both Tennessee and Texas, where Baker now lives.

Members of Monster’s fiber crew works along Hinkle Lane near the Blue Gill Grill. The TN Emergency Broadband Fund grant will allow them to expand 26 additional miles inside Moore County. {Photo Provided}

The Monster award is part of $61 million to be awarded in Tennessee as part of the Tennessee Emergency Broadband Fund. The grants are funded through the state’s Coronavirus Relief Fund allotment from the federal government and distributed through the Tennessee Department of Economic and Community Development.

ECD received 84 applications for $89.1 million in funding. Following review and a public comment period, 62 projects representing $61.1 million were funded.

Monster plans to expand fiber in two segments. The one will start at Hurricane Creek Road then onto Cobb Hollow Road, Raysville Road, Price Hollow Road, Bobo Hollow Road, Woosley Road, and then across Highway 55 to Hilltop Circle before ending at the Smith Chapel subdivision.

The other begins in Lois at Short Creek Road then onto Marble Hill Road, Little Bean Hollow Road, Galloway Lane, Tanyard Hill Road before looping around on Bull Run Road back to Highway 50.

The other

Pursuant to federal guidelines, these projects are limited to those that would enhance access to individuals and families affected during the COVID-19 pandemic by the lack of broadband access in their area. Eligible entities included those authorized to provide broadband services in Tennessee, and eligible areas were limited to those unserved or underserved locations lacking all equipment necessary to provide a broadband connection capable of supporting telemedicine, distance learning, and telecommuting.

“We are so thankful for the opportunity to step up and do our small part in helping our state, county, neighbors, and friends,” said Baker. “The Coronavirus battle is new to us all, the battle to push broadband in underserved areas has been a task we have been fighting for 11 years.  As we stated in our application, we have never applied or considered a grant before, times are different now and the need for our services has never been greater.”

Though Monster does not have a timeline for the projects yet, they will announce roads as they go live and are install ready on their Facebook page. Click here to like their page and stay up to the minute. •

{The Lynchburg Times is the only independently owned and operated newspaper in Lynchburg. We cover Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}