Moore County Public Pool opens on July 1

According to the Mayor’s office, the Moore County Pool will re-open on Wednesday, July 1. {File Photo}

LYNCHBURG — Splish, splash … the Moore County Public Pool will re-open on July 1. According to Metro Mayor Bonnie Lewis, hours of operation will be the same as the previous year: Monday through Saturday from 12 – 5 p.m. and closed every Sunday. They will also be closed on Saturday for the July Fourth holiday.

Because of the close contact required, the public pool will not offer swimming lessons this year.

Things will be a little different this year in order to balance the need to socially distance during the COVID-19 pandemic.

“Because communities around us may not open [their pools] this year and we have a small pool, supported by taxpayers, folks will need to prove they either live or work in Moore County for admission,” says Mayor Lewis. “You will only have to show that proof one time and we will keep your family’s name on file.”

Proof of residency will include: a copy of a water or electric bill, proof of attending Moore County schools, or proof of employment in Moore County.

Lifeguards will also be checking temperatures upon entrance. No one with a temperature of 100.4 or above will be allowed to enter. Therefore, pool officials ask that parents wait to make sure their children pass a temperature check instead of just dropping them off.

“No one will be allowed to enter with a temperature of 100.4° or above. If someone’s temperature reads above the limit, they will be allowed to sit and cool off a minute if they feel sure they are not sick and we will recheck it,” the Mayor said.

Also, due to safety concerns, masks will not be allowed to be worn while in the water. Mask will not be mandatory when outside the water.

“According to CDC and health guidelines chlorine kills most viruses while in the water. We will have someone available to wipe down vending machines and public seating on a regular basis. Soap and water is available in the restrooms for hand washing and hand sanitizer will be readily available as well,” said Mayor Lewis.

The admission prices will be the same as the previous year: ages three and under, free; ages 4-17, $2; and 18 and older, $3.

To reach the Moore County Public Pool call 931-307-4222 or to schedule a pool party call Pool Manager Erica Coons at 931-307-4189. Any questions regarding the new guideline should be directed at Mayor Lewis’s office at 931-759-7076. •

{The Lynchburg Times is the only independently owned and operated newspaper in Lynchburg. We cover Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

Motlow medical lab tech program earns accreditation

Motlow officials say Dr. Kim-Sue Tudor has been instrumental in developing their new Medical Lab Technology Program. It recently earned national accreditation. {Photo Provided}

MOORE COUNTY — Interested in a high-wage, high-demand medical or health-related career? Good news … you can attend a nationally accredited program right here in Moore County.

The Motlow State Medical Laboratory Technology (MLT) program cleared a significant hurdle in April when it earned full accreditation with the National Accrediting Agency for Clinical Laboratory Sciences (NAACLS). 

“We encourage anyone who has an interest in a medical or health-related career to explore the Medical Laboratory Technology program,” said MLT Program Director Dr. Kim-Sue Tudor. “Motlow’s MLAB 1301 pre-requisite course is an excellent way for students to find out more about this exciting and fulfilling career opportunity.”

Dr. Tutor spearheaded the development of the high-wage, high-demand program, which officially began in the fall 2018 semester with the seven graduates.  Every member of the class earned national certification through either the American Society for Clinical Pathology (ASCP) or American Medical Technologists (AMT).  Both certifications are recognized by the Tennessee State Medical Laboratory Board for applicants seeking an MLT license. According to the U.S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Employment Statistics website, the forecasted growth nationally in MLT employment over the next ten years is almost 14 percent.

Many employers require certification because they know that certified allied health professionals are committed to their profession and patient care. Certified individuals also tend to enjoy higher wages and more significant promotional opportunities.

For more information on the MLT program at Motlow, click here or go to or contact Dr. Kim-Sue Tudor at ktudor@mscc.edu, or 615-220-7912. •

{The Lynchburg Times is the only independently owned and operated newspaper in Lynchburg. We cover Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

Lynchburg native Bobby Majors added to Hall of Fame ballot

Lynchburg native Bobby Majors was recently added to College Football Hall of Fame ballot. {Historic Photo via Tennessee Athletics}

Another Majors with Lynchburg roots is making football news. Former Tennessee Volunteer punt and kick returner, Bobby Majors, joined two other former Tennessee players – wide receiver Willie Gault and linebacker Al Wilson – on the National Football Foundation’s 2021 College Football Hall of Fame ballot.

Robert Owen Majors grew up in Lynchburg with his football family and his famous brother John Majors, who coach the Volunteers from 1977 -1992. Bob came along 14 years after John but both inherited their father, Shirley Majors’, athletic abilities and competitive nature.

At Tennessee, Bobby enjoyed an All-American career. As a punt returner, Bobby set Tennessee records with 117 returns for 1,163 yards. He also averaged more than 30 yards per kick returned during his 1971 season landing him in the Vol record books as the third-highest average in program history.

On defense, Majors plays a ferocious defensive back and ball hawk who led the nations in interceptions in 1970. SEC official named him to the All-SEC team in 1970 and 1971. UT officials also named him to the 100-year team as Defensive Back of All Time. He led his team to victory in the 1971 Sugar Bowl and would later be drafted into the NFL by the Philadelphia Eagles. He also played for the Cleveland Browns.

Bobby Majors now lives in Chattanooga.

To see the complete Hall of Fame Ballot, click here. The 2021 voting deadline is July 7. The Hall of Fame winners will be announced at the annual NFF Awards Dinner in New York on December 8. •

{The Lynchburg Times is the only independently owned and operated newspaper in Moore County … covering Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, the Lynchburg Music Fest, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

Motlow financial aid deadline approaches

Motlow State campus
Students will return to Motlow State in the fall with a mixture of traditional and online learning. {Photo Provided}

MOORE COUNTY — If you are considering registering for the Motlow State fall semester, college officials want you to focus on two words … simple and free. Applying to take classes is both incredibly simple and absolutely free.

Motlow State strives to be an engine that helps drive the economy of Moore County and Middle Tennessee. Despite the medical and social challenges of spring and summer, the time is now for action in preparation for fall. Whether you are in high school, a recent high school graduate, an adult without a degree, or looking to upgrade your work skills, Motlow has a program to fit your needs and your lifestyle, they said in a press release.

“We are asking our Middle Tennessee communities to help us spread this important message,” said Vice-President of External Affairs Terri Bryson. “The Financial Aid priority deadline is July 15, and students can best ensure their paperwork will be processed and approved by the start of fall classes by beginning the process now. Simple and free is our message. Most of our students attend tuition-free through the dual enrollment program, Tennessee Promise, and Tennessee Reconnect. There has never been a better time to enroll at Motlow.”

According to Motlow officials, fall plans include a mixture of on-campus, online, and blended courses; social distancing and mask-wearing guidelines on campus; a robust cleaning schedule for all facilities; daily health check-ins; and free online tutoring and online placement testing.

Classes will begin on August 24 and originally planned and end on December 4 with final exams beginning the next day, December 5.

The new fall plan, course-description terminology, and highlights of education options for all segments of society are featured on a new information portal by clicking here. •

{The Lynchburg Times is the only independently owned and operated newspaper in Moore County … covering Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, the Lynchburg Music Fest, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

Library’s book club announces July selection

The Book of Speculation by Erika Swyler is the Brown Bag Book Club’s July Pick. {Art Provided}

LYNCHBURG — The Moore County Brown Bag Book Club is back at it and they’ll be reading The Book of Speculation by Erika Swylar for their July pick.

The novel follows the life of a young, research librarian with an interesting family tree. His mother – long dead – worked as a circus mermaid and died mysteriously on July 24. One day a book arrives on his doorstep … fragile and water-damaged. It chronicles the life of a traveling carnival owner in the 1700s, who reports strange and magical things, including the drowning death of a circus mermaid. Since then, generations of “mermaids” in Simon’s family have drowned – always on July 24, which is only weeks away. Is his sister next?

According to Publisher’s Weekly, it’s a book, “in the tradition of Sara Gruen’s Water for Elephants, Erin Morgenstern’s The Night Circus, and Elizabeth Kostova’s The Historian. The Book of Speculation – with two-color illustrations by the author – is Erika Swyler’s moving debut novel about the power of books, family, and magic.”

The Brown Bag Book Club meets every Friday at the Moore County Public Library. The group ends and begins a new book on the last Friday of each month. They will begin The Book of Speculation on Friday, June 26. •

{The Lynchburg Times is the only independently owned and operated newspaper in Moore County … covering Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, the Lynchburg Music Fest, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

DREMC, Senior Center partner to offer electric bill assistance

Duck River presents a check to the Moore County Senior Citizens for electric bill help to be distributed in Moore County. Pictured at the check presentation are (from left to right) DREMC President and CEO Scott Spence, Moore County Senior Center Director Sharon Pragel and DREMC Office Supervisor Tara Groce. {Photo Provided}

MOORE COUNTY — Duck River Electric Membership Cooperative (DREMC) along with matching dollars from Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) recently partnered with the Moore County Senior Citizen’s to deliver Moore County’s part of $60,000 in electric bill assistance through Project Help.

Duck River Electric Membership Corporation (DREMC) is donating $30,000, which will be matched by Tennessee Valley Authority through its COVID-19 Community Care Fund, making a total of $60,000 available to help members who qualify for the cooperative’s Project HELP program amid financial hardships resulting from the COVID-19 crisis and recovery.

“The pandemic caused the loss of jobs, uncertainties and economic standstills in our communities, which left some members struggling to pay monthly bills, including electric bills,” says DREMC Office Supervisor Tara Groce. “With this additional funding for Project HELP, more families impacted by the lingering effects of COVID-19 will receive assistance.”

The three decades old program is an emergency residential energy assistance program overseen by local charity organizations in seven counties served by DREMC and supported by generous monthly and one-time donations from members and employees, who have given more than $214,000 over the past five years to the program. In Lynchburg, the Moore County Senior Citizens oversees the distribution of funds.

Assistance is available year-round to applicants who qualify.

“Over the past year, we’ve assisted Moore County residents with electric bills 30 times using Project HELP funds,” says Sharon Pragel, director of the Moore County Senior Center. “We are so thankful for the additional Project HELP funding today. Assistance through DREMC’s Project HELP program ensures that resources are available to those in need.”

To apply for electric bill assistance through Project HELP, visit the Moore County Senior Center at 87 High Street in Lynchburg. Normal hours are weekdays, 8 a.m. until 2 p.m. If you need to speak to someone at the organization, call 931-759-7317 or 931-703-1014. •

{The Lynchburg Times is the only independently owned and operated newspaper in Moore County … covering Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, the Lynchburg Music Fest, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

Jack Daniel cancels 2020 Barbecue

The 2019 Jack winners Clark Crew BBQ will hold the title for one more year. Distillery officials announced today that the 2020 Jack Daniel World Invitational Barbecue is cancelled due to COVID-19 concerns. {Photo Provided}

LYNCHBURG — On Tuesday, Jack Daniel’s Distillery cancelled the 2020 Jack Daniel World Invitational Barbecue due to COVID-19 concerns.

“After much careful thought and consideration, we’ve made the tough decision to cancel this year’s competition,” they stated through a social media post. “The health, safety and well-being of our competitors and attendees is our highest priority, and in accordance with current guidelines as well as a desire to maintain The Jack’s status as the premiere competitive BBQ event, we believe this is just the right thing to do.”   

On Tuesday, the distillery also stated their commitment to hosting an event in 2021.   

 “We so appreciate the competitors, our attendees, our community and all those who come out every year to support this event,” they continued. “We share the disappointment, too, but hope everyone will mark their calendars for October 8-9, 2021, because there will be smoke back again in the Hollow.” •

{The Lynchburg Times is the only independently owned and operated newspaper in Moore County … covering Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, the Lynchburg Music Fest, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

Public library re-opens for walk-in visits

Local small business B-Double-H Woodworks recently install this Plexiglass guard at the MCPL front desk to protect both patrons and staff. {Photo Provided}

LYNCHBURG — The Plexiglass is up. Masks are available and the Moore County Public Library is back in business.

According to Director of Library Service Peggy Gold, the Moore County Public Library (MCPL) is now re-opened for walk-in traffic, though she stressed that curbside services would remain available to those who still aren’t comfortable in public spaces. The library officially re-opened Monday, June 22 at 10 a.m.

Social distancing will still be encouraged. Those patrons returning materials should continue to do so at the outside book drop before entering the library so that staff can sanitize them before putting them back into circulation. Masks will also be available at the front entrance for those who prefer one and hand sanitizer, provided by Jack Daniel’s Distillery, is also available. B-Double-H Woodworks of Moore County also recently installed a Plexiglass guard at the front desk to protect both library staff and patrons.

To reserve materials for curbside pick up or for questions, call the library at 931-759-7285. •

{The Lynchburg Times is the only independently owned and operated newspaper in Moore County … covering Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, the Lynchburg Music Fest, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

Dickey earns title of both dad and real life hero

Local father of two (pictured here with his wife, Debra, and two sons, Max and Macon) is a hero to more than a few kids in both Lynchburg and beyond. {Photo Provided}

Webster’s dictionary defines hero as a person who is admired or idealized for courage, outstanding achievements, or noble qualities and according to our sources, at least one local dad fits this description to a tee. He’s a hero at home, in the classroom, and even while on vacation.

Many people know Lynchburg native and father of two, Dusty Dickey, as different things. To some, he is a dedicated fourth grader science teacher who brings adventure into his classroom every day. To others, he’s the life-of-the-party DJ who often donates his time and disc jockeying skills to non-profit events like Halloween in the Hollow. To others, he’s the aw shucks seasonal distillery tour guide with a lineage that connects directly to Jack himself. But on a recent family vacation to Broken Bow, Oklahoma with wife, Debra, and two sons, Macon and Max, Dusty earned the title of modern days hero.

“We were floating on the Mountain Fork River,” Debra says. “Just enjoying a family day on the river when we suddenly heard kids screaming in the distance.”

Debra says at first, all four of them assumed the kids were just enjoying their day on the water too … then they noticed the look of panicked fear in their eyes and Dusty jumped into action.

“He didn’t hesitate,” Debra says. “He jumped right in. When he reached the boys, they clung to him for safety.”

With a little patience and encouragement from the banks by Debra, Macon, and Max, the trio slowly edged down river until they found a safe spot to climb back onto the shore. Apparently, the boys had been playing up stream when the current dragged them under the bridge and towards the rapids. Luckily, they were both wearing life jackets.

“I was so proud of my family for jumping in a helping,” Debra said. “Dusty truly saved those boys.”

Hero in the classroom as well

Though Dusty can spin a good yarn on a Jack Daniel’s tour, the river rescue isn’t a story he’d likely repeat. Known as an outgoing, big personality, he’s not much for tooting his own horn. That’s okay, there are lots of others willing to do that for him, like Holly Burton, the mother of a special needs student at Lynchburg Elementary.

Her son, Avery, who suffered a stroke In utero, learns in the special needs classroom of Debra at LES. Dusty makes a point to show Avery at every opportunity that he is “differently-abled” not disabled, Holly says.

“When he made soup in the classroom, he let Avery pour the veggies from the can. When they planted peas, he let Avery get his hands dirty and feel like all the rest of the kids and have fun,” Burton says. “He’s made a difference in Avery’s school life and there’s not a day Mr. Dusty isn’t mentioned at our house.”

When the COVID-19 pandemic forced local schools to shutter, not only did Dickey post weekly science experiments on his Facebook page, he also called Avery everyday to check in on him.

When we asked Dusty’s sons recently to describe their dad … they both used the term hero. Macon, who is a rising fourth grader, really hopes he gets to be in his dad’s home room this upcoming year.

“Not because he’s my dad,” he says. “But because science is my favorite subject and I’d like to start my day with him.”

Max’s favorite thing about his dad is the fact that he’s always planning adventures and playing with them just like a big kid.

“He plays corn hole with us and we go fishing. When my favorite song comes on, he always turns it up loud so we can sing … stuff like that.” •

{The Lynchburg Times is the only independently owned and operated newspaper in Moore County … covering Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, the Lynchburg Music Fest, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

Jack re-opens Visitors Center but no tours yet

According to Jack Daniel’s officials, the Visitor Center, White Rabbit Bottle Shop, and Lynchburg Hardware and General Store have “soft” opened but the distillery isn’t yet offering tours or tastings. Miss Mary Bobo’s will also remain closed for now. {Photo Provided}

You may or may not have noticed this week that the Lynchburg Hardware and General Store on the square has re-opened with social distancing in mind. Signs are posted stating that folks should stand “two barrels apart” and that the maximum capacity for shoppers inside at one time is 20 people.

According to distillery officials, Jack Daniel’s plans to “soft open” some facilities but will not re-open to tours and tastings just yet. The Jack Daniel Visitor Center, White Rabbit Bottle Shop, and Lynchburg Hardware and General Store are all open to the public. Miss Mary Bobo’s Restaurant will remained closed until tours resume.

“Clearly, the health and safety of our employees and visitors is our primary concern.  There are a number of steps that have been taken to ensure a safe visit for our friends including limiting the number of people in the facilities at one time, increased sanitation efforts to meet and exceed safety guidelines, and other activities,” one official told us. •

{The Lynchburg Times is an independently owned and operated newspaper that publishes new stories every morning. Covering Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}