WHISKEY MAKING 101: Motlow joins MTSU, Columbia State in $300K USDA fermentation science grant

Motlow State Chemistry Instructor Nathan Fisher will lead the fermentation science partnership with MTSU and Columbia State. A $300,000 USDA grant will fund the project. {Photo Provided}

EDUCATION | Motlow State is located in Lynchburg – the unofficial whiskey capitol of the world – and right in the heart of the Tennessee Whiskey Trail. So, it only makes sense that they’d be the perfect educational partner for a fermentation science programs.

The USDA just awarded a $300,000 grant to Motlow, MTSU, and Columbia State with an eye toward attracting future agricultural students to the Fermentation Science Program, according to a recent press release.

It’s a three-year, $300,000 grant proposed by MTSU’s Tony Johnston, who is partnering with Motlow Chemistry Instructor Nathan Fisher and Columbia State’s Karen Kendall-Fite, with faculty from all three schools participating.

“Our collaboration in this grant award is part of a larger, long-term vision. We are very intentional about our plan to introduce a variety of Fermentation and Distillery Science learning opportunities,” said Motlow President Dr. Michael Torrence. “Our vision includes broadening short-term certificate training opportunities, as well as the development of new degree programs. Those programs will specifically seek to cultivate the success of minority and underserved populations in these fields.”

The grant increases awareness of agriculture and introduces fermentation concepts into lower-division undergraduate math and science classes at Columbia State and Motlow, and drives fermentation science as a career option.

“Students, in general, aren’t aware of what fermentation science is, much less that it’s agricultural,” said Johnston, professor, and director of the MTSU Fermentation Science program. “The grant seeks to get more students interested in agriculture as a career.

 “Agriculture is an applied STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math) field, but it is not traditionally viewed this way,” Johnston said. “The grant provides an opportunity to connect the dots between STEM courses and agriculture and raise awareness of and increase the potential for a student to become interested in the applied STEM career that is fermentation science.”

Johnston said part of the grant would go toward classroom equipment — smartphones and scientific equipment — for Motlow and Columbia State students to learn about chemistry, biology, and math through applications of Fermentation in their freshmen- and sophomore-level courses. The funds will also pay for faculty training.

For more information about this exciting new opportunity, contact Nathan Fisher, Motlow Chemistry Professor, at 615-220-7879 or nfisher@mscc.edu. •

{The Lynchburg Times is the only independently owned and operated newspaper in Lynchburg, Tennessee. We cover Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

Raiders shut out Eagles to advance to 5-1

The Raiders bounced back on Friday with a 21-0 victory in Eagleville to improve their record to 5-1. {File Photo by: Riley Corder for the Moore County Sports Network}

EAGLEVILLE — Positive steps forward but lot of work left to do. That’s the take away from the Raiders Friday night 21-0 win in Eagleville, according to Head Coach Kris White.

All week, Coach White and his staff repeated the same message, “Let’s fix us … the mistakes, the missed tackles, and dropped passes … and the ballgame will take care of itself.”

The Raiders acknowledged they’d struggled against the Eagles and their high scoring offense in the past. But this year with wins against traditional Region 5 powerhouses Forrest and Cornersville already in the books, the Raiders felt optimistic.

Turnover riddled first quarter

Question marks remained in the first offensive series as the Raiders pieced together a six play march down the field that got them into the Eagle’s red zone only to fumble at the 15 yard line.

After the turnover, the Eagles put together their own frustrating attempt — a 15 play series that saw two different QBs and ate up much of the first quarter clock. On third and 10, Raider Tyler Smith got a solid hit on Eagle QB Marcus Collins, forcing the fumble. The Raiders recovered and were driving as the first quarter clock expired.

The defensive firm of Carawin, Trice, and Pearson

After a false start penalty to start the second quarter, Raider QB Kyler Parker threw to Brayden Cashion who then ran just short of the goal line. His first and goal effort gave the Raiders four shots at the end zone but they only needed one. On the very next play from scrimmage, Parker rushed into the end zone for six points. Chase Bradford’s PAT sailed through the upright to give the Raiders a 7-0 second quarter lead.

On the next Eagle’s series, they found a rhythm and pieced together several first down plays before Eagle QB Collins got hammered by the firm of Carawin, Trice, and Pearson. The ghost of that hit followed Collins for the rest of the game as he could often be seen turning towards Raiders footsteps that weren’t always there. The Eagles punted on fourth and five.

It was two steps forward and three steps back on the next Raider series. Moore County got a first down on a Parker to Cashion pass and then suffered two consecutive plays for a loss. On third and 14, Parker found Kaden White at midfield for a first down play with 5:14 remaining in the first half. After another set of downs thanks to a hand off to Cashion, the Eagles tackled Parker in the backfield for a loss at the 33 yard line to set up third and 12. Moore County called time out and then Parker under pressure threw incomplete to Cashion to make it fourth and 12.

With time expiring in first half, the Raiders were in two down territory. On the very next play, Parker threw a screen pass to Dawson White who scampered in for six Raider points. Bradford’s PAT added another.

After scores from Parker and Dawson White, the Raiders headed into the half time locker room up by 14.

Half time adjustments

In the first half, the Raider offense found its rhythm. Raider play makers came down with the ball and the offense managed crucial third down conversions. Despite outstanding first half defensive play by Tyler Smith and Donavin Pearson, the defensive line struggled. So did the offensive line and most the Raiders first half runs were managed by QB Parker as Moore County run blocking just wasn’t here. QB Parker continued to get hassled and forced out of the pocket in the second half.

After a scoreless third quarter, the Raiders and the Eagle continued to trade downs and turnovers until around the six minute mark, Parker continued to do the heavy rushing lifting to get the Raiders a couple of first downs. Then, on second and goal, Tyler Smith muscled into the end zone for the Raiders final score of the contest. Bradford’s PAT gave Moore County their final points.

The 21-0 victory improves the Raiders record to 5-1 while the Eagleville falls to 2-4. The Raiders will enjoy a bye week during fall break before playing to a homecoming Raider crowd against Jo Byrnes on October 9. •

{The Lynchburg Times is the only independently owned and operated newspaper in Lynchburg, Tennessee. We cover Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

Moore County COVID-19 Update: 6 Things to Know This Week

This map represents cases by county as of Friday at 2 p.m. {Graphic Provided}

With the announcement of Friday’s numbers at 2 p.m., Tennessee reported 189,454 total confirmed COVID-19 cases. Our state experienced 136 new deaths this week but the deceased rate remains at around one percent. According to the state, 172,618 total COVID-19 patients have recovered or have inactive cases. Here’s the top six things you need to know for this week:

1| Moore experiences it’s largest one week increase. According to today’s numbers, Moore County gained 24 new COVID cases in the past seven days – from 145 on September 19 to 169 today. This is the largest weekly increase since the state began tracking numbers in March. There were more recoveries (17) than new active cases (11) in the past seven days. Moore County has experienced one COVID-related death.

2| Coffee County replaces Bedford as regional hotspot. Regionally, Coffee County experienced that greatest seven day increase with 141 followed by Franklin County (88), and Lincoln County (35). Previous regional hotspot Bedford County experienced the smallest increase this week with 33.

3 | More new state cases than recoveries reported this week. In state numbers, there were more new COVID cases (8015) in the past seven days than recovered/inactive cases (7636). Tennessee had 136 new COVID deaths this past week for a total of 2,352. Nearly three percent of Tennessee residents have reported confirmed cases.

4 | Regional testing moves from Manchester to Tullahoma. This week regional testing moved from the Old Southern Family Market in Manchester to Waggoner Park in Tullahoma. Free COVID-19 testing will take place at 1208 East Carroll Street in the pavilion closest to Industrial Boulevard. Locals may remain in their cars for testing.

5 | Nashville names hotspots. If you are headed to Nashville this weekend, it’s best to avoid COVID hotspot identified by the Metro Health Department this week including 49 sites and six downtown bars. These location have been linked to more than 2,600 cases of coronavirus and include Loser’s, Tootsie’s, Dogwood, Kid Rock’s Honky Tonk, Dawghouse Saloon, and Winners.

6 | Flu vaccinations are especially important this year. Health officials say in the midst of the COVID 19 health situation it’s now more important that ever to get a flu shot. According to the CDC, the flu viruses and the virus that causes COVID-19 will both be spreading this year and recommends that all people six months and older get a yearly flu vaccine. It’s best to get your flu vaccine before the end of October. •

{The Lynchburg Times is the only independently owned and operated newspaper in Lynchburg, Tennessee. We cover Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

Motlow highlights 50 years of achievements in recent annual report

Motlow College celebrates 50 years with an Annual Report highlighting their achievements. The college opened its doors on September 22, 1969. {Historic Image Provided}

LOCAL NEWS | It all began in over 50 years ago after almost five years of planning. On September 22, 1969 Motlow State Community College officially opened its doors to 551 students on a 187 acre campus in Moore County donated by the Motlow family.

To celebrate 50 years, Motlow State recently released their 2019-2020 Annual Report, which highlights the school exponential growth. Click here to view that report.

The report is a colorful, vibrant 50-page publication providing critical statistical information, features, and photos from the College’s 50th Anniversary, academic milestones, and critical operational achievements that lean Motlow into the future and the next 50 years.

“The Annual Report is a capsule of the 2019-20 academic year from a statistical standpoint,” said Motlow Communications Director Scott Shasteen. “However, with our talented graphics and content creators, we bring numerical data to life, transforming it into a pleasing visual experience and proudly displaying it for the public. I’m often asked in the community, how are things at Motlow? This report tells our story.”

Motlow achieved a school record for enrollment with 7,023 students in fall 2019. Included in that student population was 1,819 dual enrollment students, the most of any community college in the TBR system. Motlow awarded 1,182 degrees during the year, another new school record.

An additional highlight for the College is its incredible 800% growth in the number of dual enrollment students who graduated from Motlow and high school at the same time. Dual enrollment students made up over 25% of Motlow’s student population.

One of the items highlighted in the report is the recent announcement of the new distillery training education partnership with both Jack Daniel’s and Nearest Green’s distilleries. To read our full coverage of that partnership, click here.

The report also highlights Motlow’s awards and achievements by individuals and as collective units. McMinnville Librarian Sharon Edwards won the TBR Statewide Outstanding Achievement Recognition (SOAR) Award, and Motlow’s External Affairs department won multiple state, regional, and national awards for Ovation magazine, Robotics design and marketing, and graphic creation.

To learn more about Motlow State Community College, visit their website. •

Deer archery season opens September 26

Deer Archery-only season will open statewide in Tennessee on Saturday. {File Photo}

OUTDOORS | It’s a rite of passage for Volunteer State hunters each fall. On Saturday, September 26 the 2020 Deer Archery-only season will open statewide in Tennessee and run September 26 through October 30 and November 2-6. Once deer season opens officially, hunters may use archery equipment throughout the season, which will end on January 3.

For local hunters looking for opportunities, the state offers over 100 wildlife management areas (WMA) and refuges for hunts. Click here for a list of the WMAs. Southern middle Tennessee exists in Region II and includes nearby WMA at AEDC, Woods Reservoir Refuge, Flintville Hatchery, and Mingo Swamp. Click here for more information.

Regardless of the hunting location, all hunters must possess a current, valid hunting license and the state reminds hunters that they must obtain permission from landowners to hunt on private land.

For more information, you can access the 2020 Tennessee Hunting Guide by clicking here. You can also visit the TWRA website for more information. •

{The Lynchburg Times is the only independently owned and operated newspaper in Lynchburg, Tennessee. We cover Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

Local STEM educator hosts NASA Observe the Moon Party

Local STEM outreach and science educator, Billy Hix, will host the NASA Observe the Moon Party on September 26. Hix is a former Motlow College professor and familiar face in Moore County Schools. {Photo Provided}

EVENTS | Usually it requires a trip to Huntsville, but this year you can join the fun from anywhere. On Saturday, September 26 from 6:30 to 7:45 p.m., local STEM educator Billy Hix will host the International Observe the Moon Party presented by the NASA Planetary Missions Program and the U.S. Space and Rocket Center in Huntsville.

It’s an event meant to celebrate our fascination with the moon. Over 50 years ago, the Apollo 11 crew led by Neil Armstrong, Buzz Aldrin, and Michael Collins used 7.5 million pounds of thrust to propel themselves into space and history. As more than half a million people watched from home including President Kennedy and Queen Elizabeth, Armstrong became the first human to step foot on the moon and American’s have been obsessed ever since.

Hix took early retirement from teaching science at Motlow College to turn his attention towards STEM outreach in Tennessee schools. He zig zags across the state with his portable planetarium to visit nearly 100 schools and over 71,000 students each year. He visits Moore County students several times a year.

The live stream event on Saturday will be live planetarium show with interviews with Planetary Scientists. It’s a fantastic opportunity for both the science-curious and home or virtual school students. On the day of the event, click here to join. For more information, visit the event’s Facebook page. •

{The Lynchburg Times is the only independently owned and operated newspaper in Lynchburg, Tennessee. We cover Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

Raiders travel to Eagleville on Friday

SPORTS | Will the Moore County Raiders bounce back after a tough, first-of-the-season loss in Lincoln County last week? That’s the question Raiders fan are asking as MCHS heads into week six. After coming out sluggish in the first half last week, the Raiders came out swinging after halftime and managed to tie the game late in the fourth quarter. To read our complete coverage of that game, click here.

The Raiders (4-1, 1-1) will to travel for a non-region game against Eagleville (2-3, 1-1) on Friday. The Raiders lost last Friday 28-22 against Fayetteville City. Eagleville beat Community at home last Friday 40-8.

The Raiders failed to establish a running game against the Tigers. Moore County managed just 138 yards on the ground last week with the majority coming from scrambles by QB Kyler Parker. In the air, the boys in Columbia blue snagged 20 receptions for 176 yards.

“I was proud of the way the kids came back and fought in the second half,” Head Coach Kris White told Benji Garland during this week’s episode of Coach’s Corner on The Moore County Sports Network. “I don’t think they showed up at all to play in the first half.”

Against Fayetteville City, Raider QB Parker complete 20 of 35 passes and also lead in rushing yards with 76 yards on 15 carries. Tyler Smith followed with 31 rushing yards on seven carries. In the passing game, Dylan Scruggs led with three catches for 65 yards including a 55 yard game-tying touchdown pass reception. Kaden White followed with six catches for 48 yards.

The Raider D worked hard last week to give their offense a chance. K. White and Donavin Pearson led with 15 tackles each. Hayden Carter followed with 13 tackles and Tyler Smith added 11 more.

Fix us first, says Coach White

Coach White says he’s less concerned about Eagleville and more concerned with Moore County fixing what wasn’t working against Fayetteville City.

“We have to fix the things that are on us as coaches,” Coach White said during Coach’s Corner. “We’ve got to review the film and see what hurt us … what schemes that put us in bad positions … we’ve got to fix us first. We’ve played five games. We have five games left. Our goals haven’t changed. We can still accomplish the goals we set out to accomplish.”

Eagleville started slow with three consecutive losses (against Huntland, Cornersville and Forrest) but have gained steamed as of late. They currently rank third in Class AA Region 5 action behind Forrest and Lewis County.

Raiders fans will want to keep an eye on the quick release and scrambling feet of Eagle QB Marcus Collins who threw for five touchdowns in the 40-8 win over Community. He also ball hawked an interception on defense. Eagles sophomore wide receiver Kaden Snitzer also managed a Murfreesboro Area High School Athlete of Week nomination last week for his six catches for 110 yards and three touchdowns against Community. On defense, Raider QB Parker will need to keep his head on a swivel against the Eagle D-line led by Wyatt McLemore.

The game will kick off in Eagleville at 7 p.m. For those who plan to travel, the GPS address is 500 Highway 99, Eagleville, TN 37060. If you can’t travel to the game, it will be broadcast live on Raider Country 105.1 and 95.5 FM with Joe Abraham and the Moore County Sports Network, on the NFHS Network, or The Lynchburg Times will post live score updates on our Facebook page. •

{The Lynchburg Times is the only independently owned and operated newspaper in Lynchburg, Tennessee. We cover Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

Raiders drop two spots, remain in AP Top 10

The Raiders were ranked #7 in this week’s AP High School Football Top 10. {File Photo}

SPORTS | After losing a close one in Lincoln County last Friday to the Fayetteville City Tigers (4-1), the Moore County Raiders (4-1) remain one of the top 10 Class 1A teams in the state, according to the Associated Press (AP). In the new AP Tennessee High School poll released on Monday, Moore County dropped two spots to number seven.

Fayetteville City – who beat the Raiders 28-22 in week five – rose one spot to number five. Fellow Region 5 team the Cornersville Bulldogs (4-1) moved down one spot to number nine. Number one South Pittsburg (5-0) and number two Lake County (2-0) continue to battle out for the top spot.

In Region 5A action, the Raiders (1-1) remained tied with Cornersville (1-1) for the third spot. Fayetteville City leads with a perfect record in region play followed by Richland (1-0). Both Huntland and Mount Pleasant remain winless in region play.

The Raiders play the fourth of four consecutive road games this Friday night in Eaglesville. According to Moore County Athletic Director Josh Deal tickets will be limited to this away game and will be offered to the families of players, managers, and cheerleaders first. All available tickets can be purchased through the MCHS front office. (Updated at 2:30 p.m. on Wednesday: MC’s allotment of tickets is now sold out.) For more information, call 931-759-4231. •

{The Lynchburg Times is the only independently owned and operated newspaper in Lynchburg, Tennessee. We cover Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

Council approves $2.5 million sewer project

Collapsed pipes, blocked sewer lines, sewage back ups, and even a moratorium handed down by the state limiting growth, Metro Utilities seeks to avoid these bad outcomes by moving forward with a $2.5 million sewer system rehab. [File Photo}

LOCAL NEWS | Collapsed pipes, blocked sewer lines, sewage back ups, and even a moratorium handed down by the state limiting growth … these are just a few of the bad things that can happen if Metro Moore County does not address pressing issues in its sewer system. That’s the opinion Metro Utilities Department (MUD) General Manager Russell Sells presented to the Metro Council on Monday as he appeared before the council to request permission to move ahead with a $2,500,000 State Revolving Fund (SRF) Loan to repair the sewer system and restore capacity with an eye towards growth in the county.

Together with S&ME Project Manager Travis Wilson, Sells stated that recent flow studies during both wet and dry conditions revealed multiple root balls, cracks, and other defects that could result in major failures in the future. He also explained the flow monitoring uncovered a massive increase in peak times sewer flow.

Designed and build around 1960, the current system’s built to managed around 300,000 gallons a day. Flow monitoring revealed that during wet weather the system was trying to handle more than 940,000 gallons — a 526 percent increase.

“There’s just no way it can pump that much over a six inch main line,” Sells explained.

According to Sells, if that flow has nowhere to go it can back up into local homes and business, or even overflow through the tops of local manholes.

“The Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) allows us five overflows in a single calendar year and we’ve come right up to the edge of that several times.”

Not only could overflows cause Metro problems with state and federal regulatory agencies but they can also fine the local utility. Instead, MUD would like to rehab and repair the older concrete and clay sewer lines with a $2,500,000 project funded by money already baked into the most recent water and sewer increases and facilitated through the low interest loan.

“We try to think four to five years ahead,” explained Sells.

Wilson added that proactive fix are less costly than emergency repairs. The plan calls to rehab 7,000 – 10,000 of Metro’s 40,000 feet of sewer line.

“Point repairs cost around $10,000 each,” Wilson said. “You can rehab it with lining for around $48 a foot. It’s a very economical repair.”

The Metro Council voted unanimously to move ahead with the project. The resolution will require two more readings and a public hearing. If it receives final approval, MUD anticipate work to begin next spring with an estimated completion date of February 2022.

For questions about the project, contact MUD at 931-759-4297. The Metro Council will meet again on Monday, October 19 at 6:30 p.m. at the Lynchburg Legion Building. •

{The Lynchburg Times is the only independently owned and operated newspaper in Lynchburg, Tennessee. We cover Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

Mayor: Avoiding 2020 Census will cost Moore County dollars

LOCAL NEWS | Funding for Moore County Head Start, paving and repairing local roads, support for the Metro Moore County Volunteer Fire Department … what do each of these things have in common? The federal and state dollars available to support them are determined by Moore County’s latest total population numbers and Moore County’s total population number is based on the most recent census.

The deadline to respond to the 2020 Census is September 30. {Graphic Provided}

That’s why Metro Mayor Bonnie Lewis wants you to know that the deadline to be counted in the 2020 Census is fast approaching. September 30 will be the deadline to submit your 2020 response.

In rural communities like ours, your response is crucial for planning and each person not counted could cost Moore County as much as $20,000 each over the next 10 years, according to Census officials.

“We are one of the smallest counties in the state, yet we have infrastructure needs like one of the top five or six larger counties,” Mayor Lewis says. “Our latest population estimate is over 6,400 people yet we accommodate over 300,000 visitors a year. Getting the census numbers right determines funding to Moore County for the next 10 years. “

Filling out the survey could not be simpler. Simply visit the 2020 Census website and answer less than 10 easy questions.

And remember, by law, your answers on the U.S. Census can never be used against you by any government agency or court. Getting an accurate count of every person living in Moore County is important. Census numbers help determine how billions in federal dollars are spent. They also determine how many seats in Congress the State of Tennessee gets. For more information, visit the U.S. Census website. •

{The Lynchburg Times is the only independently owned and operated newspaper in Lynchburg, Tennessee. We cover Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}