Spotted Saddle Horse Show planned for Aug. 8

Organizers plan the annual Spotted Saddle Horse show for August 8. It benefits MCHS Project Graduation. {File Photo}

LYNCHBURG — The American Spotted Saddle horses blends Spanish-American type gaited pinto ponies with gaited horse breeds like the world-famous Tennessee Walking Horse. They are colorful and often favored for both pleasure and trail riding.

The Metro Moore County Volunteer Fire Fighters recently announced that they are making plans for their annual Spotted Saddle Horse Show in Wiseman Park. The event is slated to take place on Saturday, August 8.

It’s an annual fundraiser for Project Graduation. This year’s event will benefit the Moore County High School Class of 2021. They are currently looking for event sponsors. Sponsors names will be announced before the class of your choice including a full class sponsor, half class sponsor or ribbon sponsor.

For more information, contact the Class of 2021 by clicking here. You can also mail your sponsorship to MCHS Class of 2021 c/o Jill Stewart, 412 Dick McGee Road, Lynchburg, TN 37352. •

{The Lynchburg Times is the only independently owned and operated newspaper in Lynchburg. We cover Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

Metro Mayor: No mask mandate in Moore County

Metro Mayor Bonnie Lewis says she and Metro Sheriff Tyler Hatfield are in agreement that a mask mandate would be difficult to enforce in Moore County. {File Photo}

MOORE COUNTY — According to Metro Mayor Bonnie Lewis, she will not issue a mask mandate in Moore County. On July 3, Tennessee Governor Bill Lee issued Executive Order 54, granting Tennessee county mayors and executives the power to issue individual mask mandates in their locations. The Governor’s office official position is that they high recommend but will not require masks.

The following day on Metro Moore County’s Facebook Page, Mayor Bonnie Lewis issued a public statement saying she had no plans to issue such a mandate.

“I do not plan on issuing a mandate in Moore County saying our citizens have to wear a mask,” Mayor Lewis stated. “Sheriff Hatfield and I are in agreement. We don’t have the manpower to police any such action and we don’t think it is the right thing to do here. I understand why the governor wanted to give the decision to the local governments because one size ruling does not fit all. Since the beginning, he has also recommended that we need to be responsible.

“It is obvious that folks are at different levels of comfort with the coronavirus,” she continued. “People are ready to make decisions about what they feel is best for them and their family. I have faith our citizens will be considerate and respectful of others by giving everyone their space – literally and figuratively.”

Larger communities like Davidson County (Nashville), Williamson County (Franklin), Hamilton County (Chattanooga), Robertson County (Springfield), and Sumner County (Gallatin) all issued mandatory mask mandates.

Many officials in southern, middle Tennessee’s smaller, more rural counties choose not to mandate masks. In addition to Moore County, mayors in Coffee, Franklin, Giles, and Lawrence counties have publicly stated that they do no intend to issue a mask mandate.

To express your opinion for or against a mask mandate in Moore County, contact Mayor Lewis at 931-759-7076. •

{The Lynchburg Times is the only independently owned and operated newspaper in Moore County … covering Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, the Lynchburg Music Fest, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

Tims Ford plans outdoor survival school

Learn the keys to outdoor survival at Tim’s Ford Forged at the Ford. {File Photo}

FRANKLIN COUNTY — Think you could survive for three days and two nights on an island in Tims Ford Lake with just a handful of gear? Then you should definitely register for Forged at the Ford Outdoor Survival School, which will take place July 17-19. Registration ends on July 10, and there are limited spots available.

A Tims Ford Park Ranger will teach campers a variety of survival basics using minimal equipment and resources. Participants will learn friction fire, shelter building, knots, and more. During the three days, campers will live off the land by learning wild edible plants, trapping, fishing, and outdoor cooking. Rangers designed the program for all skill levels but campers must be at least 14 years old to attend and campers 14-17 years old must be accompanied by an adult.

The list of required gear includes a fixed blade knife, ferrocerium rod, screw top water bottle, hatchet or axe, 8×10 tarp, 50 feet of paracord, a flashlight or headlamp, a small metal pot, a sleeping bag, fishing line with assorted hooks, and a extra set of clothes in a waterproof container. Optional gear will include a hand saw, insect repellent, and a small first aid kit. All campers will be inventoried upon arrival.

Forged at the Ford is a rain or shine event. The price is $200 per camper. For more information, contact the Tims Ford Park Office at 931-958-3536 or visit their website. To register for the event, click here. •

{The Lynchburg Times is an independently owned and operated newspaper that publishes new stories every morning. Covering Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

Water bills get new due date

Heads up Moore County … your MUD bill now has a new due date. {File Photo}

MOORE COUNTY — Officials at the Metro Water Department would like to remind its customer that water/sewer/garbage bills will now be due on the fifteenth of each month beginning in July.

MUD offices closed early on June 26, in order to complete the new software installation that will not only implement the new due date but also give customers additional payment options. Currently, customers can pay by mail, automatic bank draft, arrange bill pay through your financial institution, or drop off payment in person at the MUD offices.

They also added the ability to pay your bill online. You just need to update your information with MUD customer service to activate online bill pay.

MUD mailed out new utility bills on June 30. Those will be the first due on the new billing cycle. For questions or concerns about the changes, contact the MUD offices at 931-759-4297. •

{The Lynchburg Times is the only independently owned and operated newspaper in Moore County … covering Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, the Lynchburg Music Fest, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

7 Things To Do July 4 Weekend

All Weekend — Going to the drive in is as American as baseball or apple pie. Southern, middle Tennessee is lucky to have one of our very own located in Estill Springs. The Montana Drive In will show a couple of vintage flicks this weekend that are perfect for a little socially distanced fun. They’ll play Gremlins (1984, PG), Batman (1989, PG-13), Curse of la Llorona (2019, R), Nightmare on Elm Street (1984, R), The Jungle Book (2016, G), and Star Wars: The Force Awakens (2015, PG-13) this weekend. Click here for showtimes.

Friday — Oh hello grandmother … kick off July 4th weekend with the musical styling and overall entertaining DJ Dusty D at Hard Dock Cafe at Tims Ford Marina from 5:30-8:30 p.m.. He’s a local fourth grade school teacher and Jack Daniel’s tour guide who also spins a few mean tunes. You’ll have a good time … we promise.

Friday — A July 4th weekend shrimp boil? Yes please. The Mercantile Cafe offers a Friday night shrimp boil each first Friday of the month and in July that lines right up with the July 4th holiday. The Shrimp Boil starts at 5 p.m. and ends at 8 p.m. and take out is available. Click here for more info.

Friday — The River Bistro is one of the hidden gems in the southern, middle Tennessee dining scene. Nestled in quaint downtown Normandy, they offer seafood, pasta, steaks, as well as a meat and three lunch menu. On Friday night, they’ll host live music by Rosenthal + Fox. Seating is limited due to social distancing and reservations are highly recommend. Click here for more details.

Saturday — Pssst. Come here and we’ll tell you a secret. A certain Moore County resident throws a huge Independence Day bash each year complete with fireworks. Though it’s a private event, the fireworks rival anything that a surrounding county puts on. You can view them from anywhere near the intersection of Highway 129 and Highway 55 on Saturday starting around sundown.

Saturday — There may not be a Frontier Days celebration this year but one Moore County tradition lives on. The Metro Volunteer Firefighters will be on the Lynchburg Square on Saturday with their famous roasted corn from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. They will offer corn for a donation and all proceeds will go to Moore County-based non-profits.

Saturday — July 4th and fireworks go hand-in-hand. Drafts and Watercrafts Restaurant at Twin Creeks will host their annual Light Over the Lake event on Saturday at 9 p.m. Seats at the restaurant will be available via reservation only. Call 931-201-5516 to reserve your spot. Even if you don’t snag a spot, the fireworks will be visible at both the Dry Creek Boat Ramp and the Winchester Bass Club area. Click here for more information.

{The Lynchburg Times is the only independently owned and operated newspaper in Moore County … covering Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, the Lynchburg Musict Fest, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

Tullahoma PD seeking Moore County man in shooting

{Editor’s Note: This is an ongoing story and will be updated as more information becomes available. Each update will be timestamped.}

TULLAHOMA — A Moore County man is accused of a shooting in Tullahoma and local authorities are actively looking for him.

Tullahoma Police Officers responded to a shooting on July 2, 2020 at 1:30 a.m. at 2113 North Jackson Street, the location of the Baymont by Wyndham hotel. The victim was transported to the Tennova Healthcare-Harton helipad and Vanderbilt life flight flew him to a trauma hospital.

Police are looking for the alleged shooter, Benny Robert Reese, age 51 of Moore County, Tennessee. This is an ongoing investigation, and Police believe the two individuals knew each other.

If you have information regarding this incident, please contact Investigator Johnny Gore at 931-455-0530 or  jgore@tullahomatn.gov. •

{The Lynchburg Times is the only independently owned and operated newspaper in Moore County … covering Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, the Lynchburg Music Fest, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

MCHS Juniors: Motlow offers free Mechatronics degree

Jesse Donaldson (left) recently graduated with a Mechatronics degree from Motlow before he graduated from Franklin County High School. Jessie is one of 11 graduates to complete the program in May 2020. {Photo Provided}

MOORE COUNTY — Motlow’s dual enrollment program allow Moore County High School (MCHS) juniors to get a jump on their college careers. Many MCHS students graduate high school with their Associates Degree already in hand. Now, Motlow State offers another outstanding educational opportunity for local students … free dual enrollment courses to high school juniors interested in pursuing a degree in Mechatronics.

Mechatronics is a synergy of mechanical, electrical, and computerized technologies that together form a complex system used in product engineering, manufacturing, and packaging operations. Opportunities for employment with a Mechatronics degree are wide-ranging across the business landscape.

“High school juniors are now able to earn an associate degree, at no extra cost to them or their families, while they earn their high school diploma,” said Motlow Administrator of High School Initiatives Sally Pack. “The high demand for qualified employees in Mechatronics, along with this free opportunity, is a win-win for families, area industries, our students, and the college.”

Motlow leads the state in the number of dual enrollment students it matriculates each year. In May 2020, 11 high school seniors became the first graduates from the Middle College Mechatronics program, funded by a grant awarded to Motlow in 2018. Michael Walton of Murfreesboro earned his associate degree in Mechatronics from Motlow and his high school diploma from Oakland in the spring of 2020.

“Earning my Associate Degree in Mechatronics through the Dual Enrollment program at Motlow, with no debt, and graduating from Oakland at the same time gives me a head start on my career,” said Walton. “The program is challenging, the last three months even more so, but I completed it. I’m starting MTSU this fall to earn my bachelor’s degree in Mechatronics.”

The Mechatronics program’s goal is to prepare local students for high-wage employment as high skilled technicians. Many Motlow graduates have gone on to successful careers at Nissan, Bridgestone, and many other Tennessee companies.

“We are very proud of our dual enrollment program in mechatronics,” said Motlow Dean of Career and Technical Programs Fred Rascoe. “High school students are taking advantage of this offering and obtaining their certificate or AAS degree in Mechatronics. They are well on their way toward a gratifying career.”

Motlow Mechatronics is nationally recognized and certified by the Association for Technology Management and Applied Engineering (ATMAE) as a premier educational program with a high job placement rate of graduates. Motlow Mechatronics instructors have been awarded two National Science Foundation grants totaling more than $1 million in the last three years.

Additional to partnerships with high schools, Motlow engages in 2 + 2 partnerships with universities and colleges. An example is the Mechatronics 2 + 2 partnership with Tennessee State University, allowing Motlow graduates to pursue their bachelor’s degree in mechatronics and remain on a Motlow campus.

For more information, visit the Motlow State website by clicking here. •

{The Lynchburg Times is an independently owned and operated newspaper that publishes new stories every morning. Covering Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

Moore County Public Pool opens on July 1

According to the Mayor’s office, the Moore County Pool will re-open on Wednesday, July 1. {File Photo}

LYNCHBURG — Splish, splash … the Moore County Public Pool will re-open on July 1. According to Metro Mayor Bonnie Lewis, hours of operation will be the same as the previous year: Monday through Saturday from 12 – 5 p.m. and closed every Sunday. They will also be closed on Saturday for the July Fourth holiday.

Because of the close contact required, the public pool will not offer swimming lessons this year.

Things will be a little different this year in order to balance the need to socially distance during the COVID-19 pandemic.

“Because communities around us may not open [their pools] this year and we have a small pool, supported by taxpayers, folks will need to prove they either live or work in Moore County for admission,” says Mayor Lewis. “You will only have to show that proof one time and we will keep your family’s name on file.”

Proof of residency will include: a copy of a water or electric bill, proof of attending Moore County schools, or proof of employment in Moore County.

Lifeguards will also be checking temperatures upon entrance. No one with a temperature of 100.4 or above will be allowed to enter. Therefore, pool officials ask that parents wait to make sure their children pass a temperature check instead of just dropping them off.

“No one will be allowed to enter with a temperature of 100.4° or above. If someone’s temperature reads above the limit, they will be allowed to sit and cool off a minute if they feel sure they are not sick and we will recheck it,” the Mayor said.

Also, due to safety concerns, masks will not be allowed to be worn while in the water. Mask will not be mandatory when outside the water.

“According to CDC and health guidelines chlorine kills most viruses while in the water. We will have someone available to wipe down vending machines and public seating on a regular basis. Soap and water is available in the restrooms for hand washing and hand sanitizer will be readily available as well,” said Mayor Lewis.

The admission prices will be the same as the previous year: ages three and under, free; ages 4-17, $2; and 18 and older, $3.

To reach the Moore County Public Pool call 931-307-4222 or to schedule a pool party call Pool Manager Erica Coons at 931-307-4189. Any questions regarding the new guideline should be directed at Mayor Lewis’s office at 931-759-7076. •

{The Lynchburg Times is the only independently owned and operated newspaper in Lynchburg. We cover Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

Motlow medical lab tech program earns accreditation

Motlow officials say Dr. Kim-Sue Tudor has been instrumental in developing their new Medical Lab Technology Program. It recently earned national accreditation. {Photo Provided}

MOORE COUNTY — Interested in a high-wage, high-demand medical or health-related career? Good news … you can attend a nationally accredited program right here in Moore County.

The Motlow State Medical Laboratory Technology (MLT) program cleared a significant hurdle in April when it earned full accreditation with the National Accrediting Agency for Clinical Laboratory Sciences (NAACLS). 

“We encourage anyone who has an interest in a medical or health-related career to explore the Medical Laboratory Technology program,” said MLT Program Director Dr. Kim-Sue Tudor. “Motlow’s MLAB 1301 pre-requisite course is an excellent way for students to find out more about this exciting and fulfilling career opportunity.”

Dr. Tutor spearheaded the development of the high-wage, high-demand program, which officially began in the fall 2018 semester with the seven graduates.  Every member of the class earned national certification through either the American Society for Clinical Pathology (ASCP) or American Medical Technologists (AMT).  Both certifications are recognized by the Tennessee State Medical Laboratory Board for applicants seeking an MLT license. According to the U.S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Employment Statistics website, the forecasted growth nationally in MLT employment over the next ten years is almost 14 percent.

Many employers require certification because they know that certified allied health professionals are committed to their profession and patient care. Certified individuals also tend to enjoy higher wages and more significant promotional opportunities.

For more information on the MLT program at Motlow, click here or go to or contact Dr. Kim-Sue Tudor at ktudor@mscc.edu, or 615-220-7912. •

{The Lynchburg Times is the only independently owned and operated newspaper in Lynchburg. We cover Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

Lynchburg native Bobby Majors added to Hall of Fame ballot

Lynchburg native Bobby Majors was recently added to College Football Hall of Fame ballot. {Historic Photo via Tennessee Athletics}

Another Majors with Lynchburg roots is making football news. Former Tennessee Volunteer punt and kick returner, Bobby Majors, joined two other former Tennessee players – wide receiver Willie Gault and linebacker Al Wilson – on the National Football Foundation’s 2021 College Football Hall of Fame ballot.

Robert Owen Majors grew up in Lynchburg with his football family and his famous brother John Majors, who coach the Volunteers from 1977 -1992. Bob came along 14 years after John but both inherited their father, Shirley Majors’, athletic abilities and competitive nature.

At Tennessee, Bobby enjoyed an All-American career. As a punt returner, Bobby set Tennessee records with 117 returns for 1,163 yards. He also averaged more than 30 yards per kick returned during his 1971 season landing him in the Vol record books as the third-highest average in program history.

On defense, Majors plays a ferocious defensive back and ball hawk who led the nations in interceptions in 1970. SEC official named him to the All-SEC team in 1970 and 1971. UT officials also named him to the 100-year team as Defensive Back of All Time. He led his team to victory in the 1971 Sugar Bowl and would later be drafted into the NFL by the Philadelphia Eagles. He also played for the Cleveland Browns.

Bobby Majors now lives in Chattanooga.

To see the complete Hall of Fame Ballot, click here. The 2021 voting deadline is July 7. The Hall of Fame winners will be announced at the annual NFF Awards Dinner in New York on December 8. •

{The Lynchburg Times is the only independently owned and operated newspaper in Moore County … covering Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, the Lynchburg Music Fest, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}