Friends of Animals launches new website

Pallo dog
Pallo is just one of the animals available for adoption that you can now view on the Friends of Animals new and improved website. He’s eight months old and gets along great with kids and other animals. {Photo Provided}

LOCAL NEWS — Donate, foster, volunteer … all of these things are now just a click away for folks in Moore County.

Friends of Animals Rescue and Adoption Center in Lynchburg recently launched a new and improved website. On it, you can meet all the animals currently housed at the center, view adoption fees, and fill out an adoption application. There’s also a calendar of upcoming events and a link to their Facebook page.

The site offers information on how you can donate, foster an animal, or volunteer for the organization too. Locals can donate directly or make donations through Kroger Reward or Amazon Smiles and other affiliate programs. There’s an online store where you can by t-shirts, hoodies, and other items too.

Since it’s launch in 2013, the center’s facilitated adoptions of over 300 pets. Each rescued animal receives vet care including a microchip. To learn more, check out their website. •

{The Lynchburg Times is an independently owned and operated newspaper that publishes new stories every morning. Covering Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

Promise Manor featured on Tennessee Crossroads

Lynchburg’s Igniter Productions shot a music promo at Promise Manor in January. The local historic home and private events venue will be featured on Tennessee Crossroads this week. {Photo Provided}

LOCAL NEWS — If you’ve exhausted your Netflix cue recently, one of Lynchburg’s own will be on the small screen beginning Thursday night.

National Public Television’s Tennessee Crossroads will feature local historic home turned special events venue Promise Manor this week. The episodes will air on Thursday, March 26 at 7 p.m. or Sunday, March 29 at 10 a.m.

The first episode of Tennessee Crossroad aired in 1987. Since then, they’ve been crisscrossing the state highways and back roads highlighting the people, places, food, events, and crafts that make our state unique. In the past, they’ve featured other Lynchburg locales like Barrel House BBQ, the Lynchburg Cake and Candy Company, Miss Mary Bobo’s Restaurant, and others.

Birdie Evans, the mother of Mary Evans Bobo of Miss Mary Bobo’s fame, on the porch at what would become Promise Manor. {Historic Photo}

Promise Manor exists in the historic Green-Evans-Hudgens House on Motlow Barns Road. The NPT crew stopped by to chat with venue owners Dennis and Kayla White last November. The 1850-era home was once the home of Birdie Evans – the mother of Miss Mary Evans Bobo’s for whom Lynchburg’s famous restaurant is named.

The charming locals venue hosts baby showers, bridal showers, weddings, and other private and public special events. It’s built in the Greek Revival style and feature historic murals, and sprawling, landscaped grounds.

To learn more about them, visit their Facebook page or website. If you happen to miss the NPT airing of the episode, you can watch it at the Tennessee Crossroads website. •

{The Lynchburg Times is an independently owned and operated newspaper that publishes new stories every morning. Covering Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

Lynchburg Nursing Center needs masks, gloves

LOCAL NEWS — On Monday, the staff of the Lynchburg Nursing Center (LNC) put out a call on social media asking the general public for donations of unused personal protective equipment (PPE) like N95 masks, surgical masks, surgical gowns, or exam gloves.

“In the midst of the coronavirus epidemic, there has been an increased need for Personal Protective Equipment (PPE). If you or anyone you know have extra, unused and unopened N95 masks, isolation/surgical masks, isolation/surgical gowns or exam gloves (vinyl, latex or nitrile), please consider donating them to your local hospital, nursing facility or urgent care facility. Any donations will be put to great use and appreciated by health care’s frontline heroes,” they stated on their Facebook page.

On March 18, LNC made the tough decision to close the facility to visitors, non-essential employees, and vendors. They also stopped all group activities and communal dining temporarily. Despite this decision, the staff is still working hard to connect patients with their friends and families through mail, telephone, video calls, and other technology.

To contact them about a PPE donation, call 759-6000. LNC is located at 40 Nursing Home Road on Highway 55 across from Moore County High School. You can also learn more by visiting their Facebook page or website. •

{The Lynchburg Times is an independently owned and operated newspaper that publishes new stories every morning. Covering Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

One County, One Call: New Metro department launched during COVID-19 pandemic

LOCAL NEWS — We’re all in this together. It’s in that spirit that Metro Moore County launched a new department aimed at helping our citizens through the COVID-19 pandemic. Earlier this week, the Metro Mayor’s office, Metro Emergency Management, and Metro Sheriff’s Department announced a new public number to address any unmet needs in our community.

It’s for all Moore County citizens but especially for the elderly and health compromised among us. It’s for things like shopping for a specific grocery item, rides to essential appointments like doctor’s visits, or a wellness check on a friend or neighbor. They can also help with special medical equipment or other needs.

The new number is 931-307-6508. It’s currently manned seven days a week from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. There’s also an answering machine for after 4 p.m. calls. Mayor Lewis reminded citizens that all emergency calls should still be routed to 9-1-1. The Metro Sheriff’s Department also has a non-emergency line 931-759-7323 to report crime.

If you are willing to volunteer or donate services, click here to fill out a simple online form. If you have questions, call Mayor Bonnie Lewis’s office at 931-759-7076.•

{The Lynchburg Times is the only independently owned and operated newspaper in Moore County … covering Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, the Lynchburg Music Fest, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

Bell Buckle cancels Daffodil Day

Daffodil Day cancelled

Updated on March 17: Organizers have cancelled this year’s Daffodil Days scheduled for this Saturday due to COVID-19 public health concerns.

REGIONAL NEW | Bell Buckle — Each spring the rolling back roads leading into tiny Bell Buckle, Tennessee transform into a sea of bright yellow daffodils. Their history dates back to the 1800s, when Webb School founder Sawney Webb took a grim view of students absentmindedly snatching leaves off local plants. To teach them a lesson, Sawney assigned them to bulb planting duty all along the roads that converge into historic downtown Bell Buckle an up towards the school.

The daffodil trail as it’s called by the locals still exists today and many locals have added to it by planting thousands of their own bulbs. Each spring as the original bulbs and the newly planted ones, burst open in the warmer temperature, the town hosts one of the first spring events, Daffodil Day.

Here are three “must dos” the we picked for this year’s event:

1| Beekeeping Seminar – If you’re interested in apiculture or beekeeping as it’s commonly called, you won’t want to miss the Honey and Beekeeping Seminar with Dr. Ed Perryman. An avid local bee enthusiast and member of the Duck River Beekeeper’s Association, Perryman bursts with knowledge about all stages of beekeeping from hive construction to carrying your hive through its first winter. If you’ve ever considered starting your own hive, don’t miss this free seminar.

2| Local Author Book Signings – We’re a big supporter of the #buylocal movement and this includes local authors. The Bell Buckle Coffee Shop and Book Swap will feature three regional authors during Daffodil Day: John T. Wayne, Cabot Barton, and Lathan Hudson. Wayne is the grandson of the legendary John Wayne and a western fiction writer. Barton’s opened for artists like Emmylou Harris and the Georgia Satellites. He writes fiction based on his real world experiences. Lathan Hudson’s authored a memoir about his years in Nashville as a singer, songwriter called Once Upon a Time … There Was a Tavern, Volume 1.

3 | Free Tree Seedlings – Bell Buckle in officially the smallest town in Tennessee to earn the Tree City USA designation. Each spring the city celebrates Arbor Day during the festival and offers free tree seedlings to anyone in attendance. It’s just like taking a piece of Bell Buckle home with you.

Daffodil Day takes place in and around the historic downtown area on March 21 from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. For more information check out the Bell Buckle Chamber of Commerce website. Or for up-to-the-minute events updates, visit their Facebook page.•

{The Lynchburg Times is an independently owned and operated newspaper that publishes new stories every morning. Covering Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

Public Library remains open but closed to foot traffic

LOCAL NEWS — The Moore County Public Library Board decided last night to keep the library open but to adjust hours and close the building to foot traffic. Patrons may continue to check out items on a curb side/drive through basis. Staff will also provide materials and offer fax and copy services via drive thru. Staff posted directions and information outside to help patrons learn how to utilize library services remotely.

Librarian Peggy Gold says they adjusted their operating procedure and hours after reviewing information from the local EMA office, Stones River Regional Library as well as public guidance provided by Governor Bill Lee’s office and the White House.

The library will adjust their hours of operation. They will now be open Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday and Friday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. and closed every Thursday, Saturday, and Sunday.

“Staff and patrons will have no physical contact,” she said. “All interactions will be over the phone and through the book drop. Books, audio books, DVD, laptops and Chromebooks will be made available by calling the library.”

Thr MCPL also utilizes several online options for all library patrons. The Hoopla website allows you to borrow movies, music, audiobooks, comics and TV shows on your computer, tablet or phone. Tennessee R.E.A.D.S. also allow MCPL members to access materials from the regional system. Moore County folks may download the Libby app to read on their smart devices. For a complete list of digital library services, click here.

Gold also stated that all due dates will be extended to four weeks.

For more information, contact the MCPL at 931-759-7285 or visit their Facebook page for updates and changes in hours of operation. •

{The Lynchburg Times is the only independently owned and operated newspaper in Moore County … covering Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, the Lynchburg Music Fest, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

Get your groceries delivered … in Lynchburg

LOCAL NEWS — Well there hasn’t been anything this exciting since they started serving beer on the Lynchburg Square. Beginning March 17, Woodard’s Market in Moore County will begin grocery delivery. Delivery will be available every Tuesday and Thursday. There is a minimum order of $50 and a small ($3) delivery fee. Your order must be placed before 10 a.m. that day and groceries will be delivered between 1-3 p.m.

When we asked owner Missy Woodard why she decided to move in this direction she said that they were already doing some grocery delivery and they wanted to open it up to those who have a hard time getting to the store.

“You know, those who are sick, who don’t get around well, older folks … we’re going to do it two days a week and see what happens.”

Grocery delivery will be limited to within a 20 mile radius of the market, so this would include folks in both Lynchburg and Mulberry. To place an order, don’t call the market … instead call Bethany at 931.434.7018. •

{The Lynchburg Times is the only independently owned and operated newspaper in Moore County … covering Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, the Lynchburg Music Fest, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

Moore firefighters recognized at Appreciation Dinner

Metro Moore County Volunteer Firefighters
Nearly 25 members of the community volunteer their time to be there when their friends and neighbors need them most. The Metro Volunteer Fire Department was recently recognized an the annual Appreciation Dinner. {A Lynchburg Times Photo}

LOCAL NEWS — When the tones go off, the world stops … whether they just sat down to dinner, in the middle of the night, as they watch their kids play baseball … volunteer firefighters routinely stop everything to be of service to their community.

In Tennessee, more that 70 percent of local fire halls are staffed by volunteer crews and that includes Metro Moore County. Those members are becoming harder to recruit, according to Metro Fire Chief Mark Neal.

“A lot of department strive to be what our department is,” he said during Saturday’s Appreciation Dinner at Motlow College. “But we could still use about 10 more members.”

It takes a special person with a special heart to sign up to drop everything and work extra hours away from their families to be their for others in their worst moments. This past Saturday night, members of the Metro Moore County Volunteer Fire Department gathered at the Motlow College Cafeteria, for their annual Appreciation Dinner. It’s a night to stop, reflect, and acknowledge the countless hours they give for the greater good.

Several members of the local department plus a community member were honored. Chief Mark Neal recognized Candy Richard for all her support of the local department. He also spotlighted retired member, John Womble, for his endless hours with both the Metro Volunteer Department and the Jack Daniel’s Fire Brigade. The Department Service Award went to John LaCook. Chief Neal also recognized Nathan Long with the Department Service Award.

“He’s always going above and beyond without being asked,” Neal stated.

Crew members also took a moment to honor Assistant Chief Don Primus and Fire Chief Mark Neal for their leadership. {A Lynchburg Times photo.}

Neal also gave an emotional acknowledgement to both Assistant Fire Chief Don Primus and his wife Nancy for being the public face of the department in the Lynchburg community. After the awards ceremony, firefighter Chris Dickey stepped up to honor both Chief Neal and Assistant Chief Neal for their leadership. •

{The Lynchburg Times is the only independently owned and operated newspaper in Moore County … covering Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

MCHS hosts blood drive on Wednesday

LOCAL NEWS — There is zero evidence that the COVID-19 virus can spread through blood donation or transfusion. Despite that fact, health officials say they are beginning to see a drop off in blood donations due to public fears.

Should an outbreak happen in Tennessee, the last thing hospitals need to worry about is adequate blood supplies for trauma and cancer patients. The good news is that you can help. The American Red Cross will host a blood drive at Moore County High School on Wednesday, March 11 from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. To make an advanced appointment, click here.

MCHS is located at 1502 Lynchburg Highway. For more information, call 800.733.2767 or visit the American Red Cross website. •

{The Lynchburg Times is the only independently owned and operated newspaper in Moore County … covering Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

What Moore County needs to know about the 2020 Census

It’s been happening for 230 years and counting and Moore County residents will begin to see postcards in their mailboxes around mid-March inviting them to participate in 2020 U.S. Census. Residents may complete the form either online, by phone, or my mail. We’ve put together a list of key facts to answer any question you may have about the process:

Why do I have to participate? In short, it’s the law. The U.S. Constitution – Article 1, Section 2 to be exact – mandates that we take an accurate counting of all living persons inside the United Stated every 10 years.

Who is counted? The Census counts every person living inside the United Stated regardless of citizenship. The 2020 Census does not include a citizenship question.

What does the Census ask? It’s a short questionnaire with less that 10 questions per person. It includes your first and last name, sex, age, and race. That’s it. Click here to view a sample of the questions. Census takers will never ask about your religion, political affiliations, or income. They will also never ask for your Social Security number of financial information.

Will they keep my information private? Yes … but only for a certain amount of time. All Census answers remain anonymous and they are kept confidential for 72 years. After that, your information is released to the National Archives.

What happens if I don’t answer the form? If you choose not to voluntarily respond online, by phone, or by mail before May 1, then a U.S. Census worker will visit your home to collect the information in person. By law, they can come back up to six times.

What should I do if I suspect the person at my door doesn’t really work for the U.S. Census? All U.S. Census worker wear official identification complete with an ID badge number. If you suspect the person, get their badge number and call the U.S. Census Regional Office to verify them. Tennessee is located in the Philadelphia Regional office along with Delaware, District of Columbia, Kentucky, Maryland, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Virginia, West Virginia. You can reach them at 800.262.4236 or via email at Philadelphia.Regional.Office@census.gov.

And remember, by law, your answers on the U.S. Census can never be used against you by any government agency or court. Getting an accurate count of every person living in Moore County is important. Census numbers help determine how billions in federal dollars are spent. They also determine how many seats in Congress the State of Tennessee gets. For more information, visit the U.S. Census website. •

{The Lynchburg Times is the only independently owned and operated newspaper in Moore County … covering Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}