Motlow plans to return to campus in Fall 2021

As spring semester approaches at Motlow State, the college turns an eye toward returning to on-campus learning in the fall. (Photo Provided)

LOCAL NEWS — Spring 2021 remote and virtual classes begin on January 19 but Motlow College says its eye is on a return to in person learning by fall 2021. That plan, of course, is contingent upon the status and spread of the COVID-19 virus.

Currently, new COVID cases continue to trend upward but more slowly than during the after Thanksgiving surge. Moore County gained two new, active cases overnight and have confirmed 47 new cases over the last seven days. Our positivity rate is currently 25.5 percent and we rank eleventh in daily new cases among all Tennessee’s 95 counties.

Students, employees, and visitors are currently still required to complete a self-assessment health form before coming to campus during the Spring 2021 semester. Additionally, those on campus will continue to be required to wear masks, maintain social distancing, and follow additional protective measures.

According to a press release, Motlow remains optimistic about its fall plans but leadership will make a final determination about fully returning to in person learning by late summer. Motlow says that current planning is based on Tennessee’s vaccination plan and Motlow’s pattern of success in its pandemic response.

The approaching Spring 2021 semester will continue to operate using an alternate schedule. The alternate schedule allows most classes to meet online in a virtual environment, with on-campus exceptions made for required course completion in programs such as nursing, mechatronics, and emergency medical services. College faculty and staff are available virtually Monday through Friday from 8 a.m. until 4:30 p.m.

Motlow’s new website, which debuted recently, includes easy and intuitive navigation to apply to the College, review updated campus and COVID-19 information, choose a course or program, and contact critical services such as the library and disability, counseling, and advising.

New students planning to attend Motlow beginning Summer or Fall 2021 are encouraged to apply by Mar. 31 to ensure completion of payment, planning, financial aid processing, orientation scheduling, and any needed placement testing before their term begins.

For more information, visit their website by clicking here.

{The Lynchburg Times is the only independently owned and operated newspaper in Lynchburg, Tennessee. We cover Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

Partners for Healing wins mental health grant

Partners for Healing Nurse Practitioners Heather McAlister (left) and Faith LeGrone (right) will help more local working uninsured patients receive mental health treatment thanks in part to a grant from the Community Foundation of Middle Tennessee. (Photo Provided)

REGIONAL NEWS — Social isolation due to the global pandemic, the stress of working from home and remote learning, our state’s opioid crisis … it can all feel overwhelming. But thanks to new grant, one local healthcare provider will be able to allocate more resources toward mental health.

The Community Foundation of Middle Tennessee (CFMT) recently awarded Partners for Healing – a non-profit organization serving the working uninsured in Moore, Coffee, and Franklin counties – a $5,000 grant to address mental health issue in this area. According to Partners, the funding will allow them to expand its relationship with Centerstone Mental Health Care and increase the number of mental health appointments made.

“I am so excited to work with Partners for Healing to address the mental health and improve the wellbeing of some of the most vulnerable in our community,” said Partners for Healings Nurse Practitioner Heather McAlister.

Partners was among the 350 nonprofits across 40 Middle Tennessee counties that received their share of over $2.2 million in grants during the 2020 annual grantmaking process. Established in 2001, Partners for Healing serves as a free primary medical clinic for those who live or work in Moore, Franklin and Coffee counties. To qualify for services, applicants must have a total household income of less than 250 percent of the Federal Poverty Guidelines and at least one member of the household must work a minimum of 20 hours each week.

For more information about receiving mental health or other healthcare from Partners for Healing, call them at 931-455-5014 or to learn more visit their website by clicking here. •

{The Lynchburg Times is the only independently owned and operated newspaper in Lynchburg, Tennessee. We cover Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

Moore County citizens can now pre-register for COVID vaccine

According to the state website, there’s no new COVID-19 vaccine headed to Moore County this week but there’s now a state website where citizens can pre-register for the next round. (File Photo)

STATE NEWS — Despite the fact that there are again no additional shipments of COVID-19 vaccine headed to Moore County this week, Metro Mayor Bonnie Lewis says she feels optimistic that that will soon change and that the next round of public vaccinations in Lynchburg will go much more smoothly than the first.

“The Tennessee Department of Health recently launched an online registration portal so that Moore County residents can make appointments to receive the COVID-19 vaccine,” said Mayor Lewis through Metro’s social media page. “We will do what is needed to assist our seniors set appointments.”

You can now pre-register for a vaccination by clicking here.

Vaccine rollout changing constantly

Like any major health initiative that requires federal, state, and local coordination things tend to evolve quickly. Such is the case with the COVID-19 vaccine rollout in Moore County. On December 21, Assistant EMA Director Hunter Case became the first person in Moore County to receive the vaccine. For the next two weeks, local health department officials focused on vaccinating all Moore County 1a1 and 1a2 individuals like high exposure health care workers, first responders, and healthcare workers with direct patient exposure. On January 2, Moore County held it’s first public vaccination date for citizens 75 years of age and older.

It was a frustrating day for both local health care workers and those trying to get the vaccine. Mayor Lewis says local officials learned lessons that day and that future public vaccination dates will be by-appointment, drive thru events held at the new ballpark located along Main Street.

Originally the plan was to move vaccination events to Wiseman Park but after some deliberation, Mayor Lewis and local health care workers decided it would be easier to control the temperature for those administering the vaccine with a tent at the new park rather than an open air pavilion.

“The plan is to have the tent up and ready by the time we get the next shipment of vaccines,” said Mayor Lewis.

As of Monday, there was still no next shipment headed to Moore County, according to the state website. The Vaccine Information Sheet for Monday, January 11 stated that limited vaccine would be available in Bedford County but Coffee, Franklin, and Lincoln counties would also no receive additional vaccines this week. •

{The Lynchburg Times is the only independently owned and operated newspaper in Lynchburg, Tennessee. We cover Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

Surprise deliveries of free books showed up in Moore County mailboxes this week

Local kindergartener Abriella Smart, says she felt excited this week when an unexpected box of books arrived in her mailbox. All Moore County students in grades K-3 received the book packs as part of a state literacy program aimed at preventing the “COVID slide.” (Photo Provided)

Did your local kiddo receive a mysterious book delivery in the mail this week? It’s part of a a new state literacy program aimed at preventing so called “COVID slide” in kids grades kindergarten through third grade.

Moore County was one of over 50 school districts participating in the K-3 School Year Book Delivery Program, which will deliver books and literacy resources directly to the homes of students and teachers, at no cost to families or participating school districts. Book packs consist of ten high-quality, grade appropriate books with guided activities and tips for parents to engage with students as they read. Book packs and resources are expected to begin being delivered to students’ and teachers’ homes by the end of 2020 and began arriving at Moore County homes this week. Additionally, K-3 families will gain access to engagement tips via text.

“The School Year Book Delivery program is an incredible opportunity for our state to make important early literacy gains,” said Commissioner Penny Schwinn. “This partnership could not have come at a more important time, as many students, families and teachers are working hard to make up for classroom time lost last spring. Building literacy skills early is foundational to lifelong educational success and the department is grateful to GELF and Scholastic for their work to expand access to high-quality books and literacy resources and help students and families read together at home.”

The new book delivery program comes on the heels of a successful summer reading pilot where GELF and Scholastic distributed 2,100 book packs to students. The response from children, parents and caregivers was overwhelmingly positive, sharing feedback about the excitement of receiving new books in the mail, the joy of sharing stories together and the magic of escaping through a good book.

The program will also offer parent, teacher resource through Best for All Central, Tennessee’s Hub for Learning and Teaching. You can visit it by clicking here. •

{The Lynchburg Times is the only independently owned and operated newspaper in Lynchburg, Tennessee. We cover Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

Op-Ed: MCPL Director Peggy Gold retires leaving a “Mother Theresa” sized hole

By Jill Rael, Mulberry| Former President of the TN Library Association and Former Assistant Regional Director

Moore County Public Library Director Peggy Gold retired on January 1 after 25 years of service to her community. (File Photo)

As Moore Countians rang in the new year, the community also bid a heartfelt farewell to long-time library director, Peggy Gold. After 25 years of service, “Miss Peggy,” as she is affectionately known, officially began her retirement on January 1. In tribute to her service, I am grateful to The Lynchburg Times for this platform through which to share a small piece of Miss Peggy’s story and the impacts she made upon this community and the broader collective of Tennessee libraries.

After eight years on staff at the Moore County Public Library (MCPL), the governing board appointed Peggy as director, a position she held for over 17 years. During her tenure, Peggy completed the Public Library Management Institute in 2006, a three-year intensive program offered by the Tennessee State Library and Archives (TSLA), which trains and educates library directors without a master’s in library science degrees. To further complement her training and advance her skillset, Peggy completed an associate’s degree at Motlow State Community College in 2008 and continued to earn a bachelor’s degree in human resources management and personnel administration at Athens State University in 2010 (Suma Cum Laude).

Like all effective leaders, Peggy understood her role in the library and the importance of building a team that reflects not only the mission and vision of the library board but also the attitude of unyielding service, compassion, and dedication to free and equal access to information so ingrained in a librarian’s heart and soul. With these tenants of librarianship, Miss Peggy created an environment where her staff openly expressed ideas, received trust and encouragement, and offered enriching programs to the community.

A primary example of the unique and empowering programs hosted by MCPL is the Finding My Family genealogical project for local elementary-aged children. It was a personal favorite of Peggy’s. Finding My Family provided participants with an opportunity to discover their roots under the guidance of Miss Peggy and the outstanding resources provided by MCPL locally, TSLA, and other online and local resources. With their research completed, the children presented their findings to the community through visual displays at the library. Other unique programs are the children’s painting classes, where my own son created his first masterpiece, and the lunchtime speaker series where, for example, local adults like my mother learned of Tennessee’s Drive 55 program that led them to complete their own degrees and certifications.

Most library directors agree that finding ways to partner with their local schools and attracting the interest and participation of teenagers is among the most daunting and intimidating goals for their libraries to accomplish. Yet, Peggy has done so for years. As explained by Moore County Middle School teacher Jonah Deal, “she was the person to call if a student needed school supplies, and she provided a way for our students to also give back.” Students assisted Peggy with gifts during the Angel Tree and back to school supplies programs hosted by MCPL. Through a mutually passionate partnership between MCPL and the Moore County High School Student Council, local youth worked with Peggy to prepare Thanksgiving baskets. Two years ago, Deal reports, the program began with the preparation of 30 baskets, which Peggy delivered. However, with the uncertainties and chaos of 2020, the students prepared 60 baskets this Thanksgiving. Peggy located those in need and made deliveries. She is, Deal related, “someone who always put others before herself. She was Moore County’s own Mother Teresa.”   

Like most public libraries in Tennessee, MCPL operates under specific laws, regulations, and guidelines overseen by TSLA and administered through the secretary of state’s division. Through its field offices, known as regional libraries, TSLA provides public libraries with specific funding, training, guidance, and generally serves as a consultant to directors and boards. MCPL is a part of the Stones River Regional Library, which operates from offices based in Murfreesboro. The region consists of 26 libraries within 11 counties located as far north as Trousdale, east as Grundy, and south as Franklin. These libraries are large and small, some better funded than others; yet, they all share a passion for their communities. Moore County very often stood as a beacon of possibility within the region. When others felt limited by their small size and even smaller budgets, the accomplishments, innovations, and examples of “embedded librarianship” exhibited by Peggy and her staff afforded state and regional leadership an example of the unique opportunities that only small libraries often possess.

Historically, libraries served a simple purpose: to enrich the lives of those within a community through the lending of books. However, the 21st century library is nothing short of an amazing evolving institution able to provide services and enrichment on seemingly unlimited platforms. Those which continue to not only survive but also succeed possess leadership that understands and embraces the beautiful chaos of our modern existence. These leaders, and their dedicated staff, must possess knowledge of traditional services like reader’s advisory and reference, while also continually learning and adapting to new and ever-changing technology and public expectations. Additionally, those libraries which thrive in today’s world possess the ability and confidence to nimbly and quickly adapt to the spontaneous changes around them. During the early days of the COVID-19 pandemic, state leadership through TSLA and the Tennessee Library Association (TLA) endeavored to provide libraries with ever-changing information and offer guidance on how these most democratic of institutions could continue to safely serve their communities. We received inspiration from libraries like MCPL, which immediately began offering a full range of services remotely and through contactless curbsides. This tiny library was among the first, perhaps the actual first, in Tennessee to do so and it both inspired and guided many others that followed suit.

When speaking of Peggy the words “inspiration,” “mentor,” and “friend” often find their way into the conversation. “As Jonah Deal put it, “Peggy Gold started off as a librarian to me … then a classmate, then a coworker, but Peggy is going to end as an inspiration.” In a heartfelt note to Peggy on Facebook, MCPL Assistant Director Cheryl Eason said, “[w]e are so sad to lose our mentor, our sometimes mother, our biggest cheerleader, and most of all our friend! … Thank you for seeing something in me that I did not see … Thank you for always seeing the best in people and trying to help when you see a need.” I think so many of us in Moore County share these sentiments. For myself I would like to thank Peggy for just being herself: a great leader with a passion for service and the courage to stand alone, embrace change, and appreciate the unique qualities of those around her. You are, truly, one of the greats. Cheryl perhaps put it best when she said, “Peggy is well named because she truly has a heart of gold.” You leave an indelible mark upon Moore County, and as Lisa Riggs (MCPL staff) put it, “I can only hope we live up to the legacy you left behind.” •

{The Lynchburg Times is the only independently owned and operated newspaper in Lynchburg, Tennessee. We cover Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

COVID-19 Snapshot: What you need to know this week

{Editor’s Note: The COVID-19 situation is constantly evolving with lots of variables to consider when making decisions about how best to keep both you and your loved one safe. Each Wednesday, The Lynchburg Times will publish a weekly snapshot. It’s our attempt do collect all the important metrics is a single place for our citizens.}

Moore County gained 20 new COVID cases in the past 24 hours and now has 98 active cases and 649 inactive or recovered cases.

20 new cases in the past 24 hours. On Thursday at 2 p.m., the Tennessee Department of Health stated that Moore County reported 20 new COVID-19 cases in the past 24 hours for a total of 753 since the global pandemic began in 2020. For comparison, our four surrounding counties reported the following increases over the past 24 hours: Bedford County 88, Coffee County 91, Franklin County 55, and Lincoln County 81.

52 new cases over the past seven days. According to the state numbers, Moore County gained 52 new, active cases over the past seven days. For comparison, our four surrounding counties reported the following increases over the past seven days: Bedford 407, Coffee 365, Franklin 257, and Lincoln County 254.

Eighth highest rate of infection. According to the COVID Act Now website, Moore County currently reports the 8th highest rate of infection among Tennessee’s 95 counties. Nearby Giles County ranks number one. Our surrounding counties ranks as follows: #11 Bedford County, #12 Lincoln County, #39 Franklin County, and #55 Coffee County. These ranking are based on daily new cases per 100,000 population.

Moore County is currently in vaccine phase 1a2. This means that vaccine will be available to all 1a1 phase persons (all high exposure health care workers, residents and staff of long term care facilities, first responders, and adults who cannot live independently) as well as 1a2 phase persons (outpatient healthcare workers with direct exposure including mortuary services). Any citizen aged 75 or older is also eligible to be vaccinated. All 1a1 person are considered priority – meaning that they go to the the front of the line regardless of which risk-based or age-based phase Moore County is in. To determine your vaccine phase, click here.

No COVID vaccine shipment for the week of January 4-9. According to state officials, Moore County will not receive a COVID-19 vaccine shipment this week for the public. Instead, those available vaccines for all counties are being redirected to area drug store, who are responsible for administering doses to long-term care facility like Lynchburg Nursing Center.

Less than two percent of Moore County currently vaccinated. According to the state, 1.6 percent of residents in Moore County are currently vaccinated. That’s a little over 100 people. By comparison, less than three percent of Tennesseans are currently vaccinated. According to the state, more that 157,000 total vaccinations have been administered across Tennessee’s 6.8 million residents. That’s around 2.3 percent.

{The Lynchburg Times is the only independently owned and operated newspaper in Lynchburg, Tennessee. We cover Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

MUD asking for your help with community survey

MUD officials ask that citizens fill out this simple 13 question survey to help them apply for a Community Development Block Grant, which is formula-based on average household income. (Photo Provided)

LOCAL NEWS — During the month of January, Metro Utilities Department (MUD) customers will find a little something extra stuffed inside their monthly bill, a survey.

It’s part of the 2021 Community Development Block Grant process that MUD is currently going through in order to secure federal funding for a grant to make water upgrades in Moore County. These upgrades will address water pressure issues throughout the system as well as replacing leaking water lines, according to MUD officials.

The Community Development Block Grants Program or CDBG program issues annual grants to states, cities, and counties bases on a formula that considers the annual household incomes of the communities who apply. They are part of the Housing and Community Development Act of 1974.

In order to qualify for the grant, MUD must successfully survey a percentage of its Moore County water customers. The survey includes 13 simple questions like name, address, details of the household make up, and total annual income as well as a signature and contact phone number. All information collected will remain confidential and will only be used for the grant application process. MUD customers may return the survey with their January payment or drop it off separately at the MUD offices drop box or Metro Mayor Bonnie Lewis’s office located inside the Moore County Courthouse.

Thanks in part to the number of high paying jobs in Moore County provided by the distillery and others, tiny Moore County ranks seventh among Tennessee’s 95 counties in per capita income. This often disqualifies us from needs-based grants, which results in higher water and sewer prices than surrounding counties. This survey will help the utility department hopefully provide the CDBG program with the information it needs to qualify Moore County, MUD officials said. CDBG officials can not simply pull this information from the latest Census data for Moore County. MUD must provide it independently.

For more information, contact the MUD offices at 931-759-4297 or the Metro Mayor’s office at 931-759-7076. •

{The Lynchburg Times is the only independently owned and operated newspaper in Lynchburg, Tennessee. We cover Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

Moore County will not receive COVID-19 vaccine shipment this week

According to the state, Moore County will not receive a shipment of COVID-19 vaccine for the public this week. (File Photo)

LOCAL NEWS — Metro Mayor Bonnie Lewis says state officials informed her Monday afternoon that Moore County would not receive an additional shipment of COVID-19 vaccine this week — January 4-8.

Other counties, including those larger than Moore County, will also receive drastically reduced to none also, according to Mayor Lewis.

Shipments headed to county health department will instead go to area drugstore, who are responsible for administering COVID-19 vaccinations to long term care facilities.

The Tennessee Health Department assigns vaccination priorities. They are not controlled at the local level.

Metro Mayor Bonnie Lewis says as soon as a new vaccine shipment comes in all those citizens aged 75 and older who showed up to get vaccinated on January 2 but were turned away when supplies ran out will be notified.

“We will work together to assure all our citizens are assisted with the process … whatever it is,” said Mayor Lewis. •

{The Lynchburg Times is the only independently owned and operated newspaper in Lynchburg, Tennessee. We cover Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

Vaccine Scene: Long lines, short supplies lead to frustrations

Despite showing up early, many locals aged 75 and older left without getting the COVID-19 vaccination on Saturday due to short supplies. (File Photo)

LOCAL NEWS — This past Saturday marked the first date citizens throughout the state could receive the Tennessee Department of Health COVID-19 vaccine and things were kind of a mess everywhere.

In nearby Tullahoma, citizens 75 and older could be seen lining the streets of Wilson Avenue as early at 7 a.m. in 40 degree temperatures waiting their turn to get vaccinated. The debacle made national news.

In Moore County, local senior citizens lined up well before the 8 a.m. start time as well but thanks to quick thinking by local officials, they remained in their vehicles instead of braving the elements.

“We knew our older citizens would show up early and we tried to anticipate that,” says Metro Mayor Bonnie Lewis. “This is the age group that survived polio. They know what it’s like to watch a deadly virus sweep across the country.”

Despite their best efforts, some citizens who showed up on Saturday still walked away empty handed. The local health department ran out of doses before 2 p.m. — so did Coffee, Grundy, and Franklin counties.

“No health department anywhere got sufficient supplies of the vaccine for the numbers that showed up to be vaccinated,” Mayor Lewis says.

Mayor says vaccinations will be drive thru moving forward

The press release the state department of health issued on Wednesday stated that vaccinations would be given on a “first-come, first-served” basis and without an appointment leaving local health care workers trying to accommodate both those who just showed up as well as those who called ahead.

“It’s important to realize that health care workers remain the state-defined vaccination priority,” said Mayor Lewis. “No matter when they show up, they move to the front of the line.”

Moving forward, Mayor Lewis says that all future vaccination days will take place in Wiseman Park so that drive thru vaccinations can be offered without congesting local traffic.

Mayor Lewis also says that health officials are developing a pre-registration process to help public vaccination dates run more smoothly in the future. •

{The Lynchburg Times is the only independently owned and operated newspaper in Lynchburg, Tennessee. We cover Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

Area state parks offer first day hikes

Several area Tennessee State Parks will kick off New Year’s Day with Guided First Day Hikes. (File Photo)

Tennessee State Parks will sponsor free, guided hikes on New Year’s Day. Many state parks will host its own special hike. It’s a great way to safely spend time with friends and family to kick off the new year. Here are those happening closest to Lynchburg:

WINCHESTER | Tims Ford State Park — Local rangers will lead locals on a 2.5 mile loop hike out the Lost Creek Overlook Trail to the Lost Creek Overlook and return on the Overlook Trail. Online registration is required and due to COVID-19 restrictions, the event will be limited to 50 hikers. This is a free hike, however donations are encouraged and will go toward firefighting supplies and equipment to keep the parks safe and beautiful. Hikers should meet at 10 a.m. at the Visitors Center. Click here for more information.

MANCHESTER | Old Stone Fort State Park — Meet Ranger Caleb Doster at the Old Fort State Park Museum Roof at 1 p.m. for a two hour strenuous hike along the 3.5 mile Backbone Trail. Hikers will walk along the Enclosure Trail and see the prehistoric Native American Mounds while discussing their cultural significance to the area. As you hike, you will see both the Big and Little Duck Rivers, as well as the three magnificent waterfalls. Temperature on Friday will hover around 70 degrees but there is an 80 percent chance of rain, so dress accordingly. Hikers are encouraged to bring their own water and wear sturdy hiking shoes. Leashed dogs are welcome. For more information, click here.

BEERSHEBA SPRING | South Cumberland State Park — There is no more picturesque spot in south central Tennessee that Stone Door located inside South Cumberland State Park. Park Ranger Kristin Willis will lead hikers on a two mile hike to the best overlook in the park. Meet at 1183 Stone Door Road at 9 a.m. There’s a 90 percent chance of rain on Friday and temperatures should be in the mid-sixties. Dress appropriately. Click here for more information.

Tennessee State Parks’ First Hikes are part of America’s State Parks First Day Hikes initiative in all 50 states. Most hikes are free but each state park accepts donations. To see all the First Day Hikes being offered in our state on January 1, 2021, click here.•

{The Lynchburg Times is an independently owned and operated newspaper that publishes new stories every morning. Covering Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}