Electoral vote allotments could change if Tennessee’s 2020 Census response is down

Both Tennessee’s electoral votes and congressional delegation numbers are determine by U.S. Census numbers. There’s still time to get your 2020 Census responses in via the web. (File Photo)

The state of Tennessee enjoys 11 electoral votes but that could change if the state’s population isn’t properly counted in the 2020 Census. A state’s electoral vote allotment is determined by the number of representatives and senators in Congress. And Tennessee’s Congressional delegation is based on the state’s population as determined every 10 years by the United States Census. That’s why it’s vitally important to get every Tennessean counted before the Census ends on October 15.

The current administration decided to end the Census early in order to try and get results back before the end of the year. This year’s Census, already upended by the COVID-19 pandemic, will end on October 15. Originally, the officials planned to end the count on October 31.

Under Federal law, your Census responses are considered confidential and cannot be shared with anyone, including any government agency. There is still time to fill out your Census form online and be counted. You can still self-respond to the census online at 2020census.gov, or by phone at 844-330-2020. •

{The Lynchburg Times is the only independently owned and operated newspaper in Lynchburg, Tennessee. We cover Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

Mayor: Avoiding 2020 Census will cost Moore County dollars

LOCAL NEWS | Funding for Moore County Head Start, paving and repairing local roads, support for the Metro Moore County Volunteer Fire Department … what do each of these things have in common? The federal and state dollars available to support them are determined by Moore County’s latest total population numbers and Moore County’s total population number is based on the most recent census.

The deadline to respond to the 2020 Census is September 30. {Graphic Provided}

That’s why Metro Mayor Bonnie Lewis wants you to know that the deadline to be counted in the 2020 Census is fast approaching. September 30 will be the deadline to submit your 2020 response.

In rural communities like ours, your response is crucial for planning and each person not counted could cost Moore County as much as $20,000 each over the next 10 years, according to Census officials.

“We are one of the smallest counties in the state, yet we have infrastructure needs like one of the top five or six larger counties,” Mayor Lewis says. “Our latest population estimate is over 6,400 people yet we accommodate over 300,000 visitors a year. Getting the census numbers right determines funding to Moore County for the next 10 years. “

Filling out the survey could not be simpler. Simply visit the 2020 Census website and answer less than 10 easy questions.

And remember, by law, your answers on the U.S. Census can never be used against you by any government agency or court. Getting an accurate count of every person living in Moore County is important. Census numbers help determine how billions in federal dollars are spent. They also determine how many seats in Congress the State of Tennessee gets. For more information, visit the U.S. Census website. •

{The Lynchburg Times is the only independently owned and operated newspaper in Lynchburg, Tennessee. We cover Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

Mayor Lewis: Fill out those 2020 Census forms

Moore County currently ranks 11th in the state for self-response in the 2020 Census. Mayor Lewis is encouraging locals to keep up the good work. {File Photo}

LYNCHBURG — Be counted. It’s important. Census numbers determine things like how much federal funding Metro Moore County can qualify for, how our political districts are drawn, and future county planning. That’s why Mayor Bonnie Lewis is encouraging all local to respond to this year’s Census.

On April 2, The Lynchburg Times reported that Moore County ranked number one in state Census responses. You can read that complete coverage by clicking here. As of last week, Moore County’s self-response was 66.1 percent, which is above both the state and national average of 60.6 percent. That places us is eleventh place overall for the state of Tennessee.

Remember, if you do not participate via self-response, a 2020 Census taker will visit your home. By law, they can come back up to six times.

Why do I have to participate? In short, it’s the law. The U.S. Constitution – Article 1, Section 2 to be exact – mandates that we take an accurate counting of all living persons inside the United Stated every 10 years.

Who is counted? The Census counts every person living inside the United Stated regardless of citizenship. The 2020 Census does not include a citizenship question.

What does the Census ask? It’s a short questionnaire with less that 10 questions per person. It includes your first and last name, sex, age, and race. That’s it. Click here to view a sample of the questions. Census takers will never ask about your religion, political affiliations, or income. They will also never ask for your Social Security number of financial information.

Will they keep my information private? Yes … but only for a certain amount of time. All Census answers remain anonymous and they are kept confidential for 72 years. After that, your information is released to the National Archives.

What happens if I don’t answer the form? If you choose not to voluntarily respond online, by phone, or by mail before May 1, then a U.S. Census worker will visit your home to collect the information in person.

What should I do if I suspect the person at my door doesn’t really work for the U.S. Census? All U.S. Census worker wear official identification complete with an ID badge number. If you suspect the person, get their badge number and call the U.S. Census Regional Office to verify them. Tennessee is located in the Philadelphia Regional office along with Delaware, District of Columbia, Kentucky, Maryland, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Virginia, West Virginia. You can reach them at 800.262.4236 or via email at Philadelphia.Regional.Office@census.gov.

And remember, by law, your answers on the U.S. Census can never be used against you by any government agency or court. Getting an accurate count of every person living in Moore County is important. Census numbers help determine how billions in federal dollars are spent. They also determine how many seats in Congress the State of Tennessee gets. For more information, visit the U.S. Census website. •

{The Lynchburg Times is the only independently owned and operated newspaper in Moore County … covering Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

Moore County ranks #1 in Census responses

LOCAL NEWS We’re number one. We’re number one.

In this upside down world we’re all collectively living in right now, we could use a bit of good news. According to Metro Mayor Bonnie Lewis, the Census Bureau informed her on Thursday, that Metro Moore County leads the state of Tennessee in the number of completed 2020 Census responses. More precisely, we’re barely number one. Loundon County in East Tennessee (46.7 percent) and Williamson County (46.5 percent) are right behind us.

So you know what that means, right? You’ve got time on your hands today. Fire up those laptops and head on over to the 2020 Census website and fill yours out. You should have received a postcard or mailer in the past several weeks that offers you step-by-step instructions as well as a personally identifying number.

The Census Bureau has done a great job of putting together a website that answers any questions, click here to visit it. Or you can check out our What Moore County Needs to Know about the 2020 Census article here. We’ll check in with Mayor Lewis regularly for updates. •

{The Lynchburg Times is the only independently owned and operated newspaper in Moore County … covering Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, the Lynchburg Music Fest, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}