Governor grounds MC cheerleaders

Governor Bill Lee essentially grounded cheerleaders across the state by signing Executive Order 74 last week. An area change.org petition seeks to change that. (File Photo)

STATE NEWS — Last Tuesday definitely didn’t feel like a V-I-C-T-O-R-Y for Moore County cheerleaders.

In an abrupt and final decision with little explanation, Governor Bill Lee cancelled cheerleading for the rest of the 2021 school year and local cheerleaders, cheer moms, cheer sponsors, and other cheer adjacent Moore County folks are not happy.

Governor Bill Lee’s Executive Order 74 means that all Moore County schools cheerleading squads will not be allowed to cheer at basketball games for the remainder of the season due to COVID concerns.

The TSSAA says that it approached the governor about allowing cheerleading and dance teams to participate and were told that the “provision was a risk-based decision at this critical time based on the best medical and CDC information and guidance available regarding the spread of COVID-19 primarily through respiratory droplets, with cheerleading posing a particularly high degree of risk because it involves projected voices within a confined indoor space for an extended period of time.”

Cheerleading is a female dominant sport

Many locals were quick to point out the Governor’s decision seemed to wreak with discrimination. Executive Order 74 effectively cancelled cheerleading while permitting two other winter sports, wrestling and basketball, with little explanation.

MCHS cheerleading sponsor, teacher, and senior cheer mom Liza Buchanan stated on her social media page that the move showed that Governor Bill Lee did not care about a female dominant sport such as cheerleading.

“You cannot use COVID-19 as an excuse when there are 30 plus students sitting elbow to elbow in our classrooms, wrestlers are touching, breathing, and sweating all over each other, and basketball players are also touching and breathing on each other,” she stated on her social media page.

Cheerleaders are athletes

Other local cheer moms pointed out that cheerleading is a recognized sport with required strength training, practices, as well as regional, state, and national competitions.

When we reached out to Buchanan to quantify that idea with numbers, she was quick to respond. According to Buchanan her MCHS squad put is about 200 practice hours each year including six hours of stunt safety training, and an annual cheer camp.

“That doesn’t count the private tumbling and stunting lessons that most of our athletes attend weekly,” she said.

Cheerleaders also begin each practice with cardio followed by strength training as well as exercises to increase flexibility.

“We lift humans,” Buchanan stated. “Stunting requires extensive training and specialized skills in order to safely execute stunt sequences. It takes athleticism, grit, and a fearless attitude to succeed as a cheerleader.”

Buchanan also estimates that the total cost to cheer each year per cheerleader is $1877 before fundraisers and donations.

Petitioning the Governor and TSSAA

Following the governor’s announcement, Bonnie Peters of Washington County launched a change.org petition asking Governor Bill Lee and the TSSAA to reverse their decision.

“The governors new order possibly violates Title IX and frankly, sends a very negative message to females athletes,” she state in the petition. “Every sport under TSSAA is currently allowed to participate in the season except cheerleading. Cheers full season is July through basketball. They have already cut away game travel but now they are targeting one sport to suspend. Our cheerleaders had games already cut from 20 to 10. … After today it’s zero.”

Since Peters started the petition, it’s gained over 22,000 signatures. You can sign it by clicking here. •

{The Lynchburg Times is the only independently owned and operated community newspaper in Lynchburg, Tennessee. We cover Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

White House Task Force: Governor, rural mayors should issue mask mandates

Social distance, close all the bars, limit indoor dining to only those establishments that limit capacity, and rural mayors should issue a mask mandate … that was the advice of Dr. Deborah L. Birx, part of the White House Coronavirus Task Force, as she spoke at a press briefing Monday in Nashville.

When asked specifically whether she believed Governor Bill Lee should issue a statewide mask mandate, Dr. Birx responded, “Every week we issue a governors report. They just received their reports for this week. For every red state, and Tennessee is now in the red state category with a positivity rate of over 10 percent, the number one bullet is always mandate masks.

Following Dr. Birx’s press event, Tennessee Governor Bill Lee stated that his office had no plans to close bars or limit restaurants, nor did he intend to give county mayors or executives the power to do so.

Prior to the July 4 weekend, Governor Lee did give county level officials the power to issue mask mandates. On Monday, we asked Metro Mayor Bonnie Lewis if she planned to follow Dr. Birx’s plea for rural mayor to issue a mask mandate.

“Thankfully the White House Task Force’s initial prediction of Coronavirus cases and deaths has not met original expectations,” said Mayor Lewis. “In Moore County, we have had 37 cases since March. That is less than one percent of our population.  We currently have 15 active cases and thankfully none of our cases were severe. The CDC has just reduced the days of isolation or quarantine necessary from 14 to 10 and said there is no need to be retested to return to work. These recent facts are encouraging.” 

In Monday’s meeting, Dr. Birx warned that Nashville existed among 11 major U.S. cities that needed to take “aggressive” steps to stop the virus. Other cities included Baltimore, Cleveland, Columbus, Indianapolis, Vegas, Miami, Minneapolis, New Orleans, Pittsburgh, and St. Louis.

She also had a special message of Tennessee’s rural counties.

“I know some of you find mask uncomfortable … so do I,” Dr. Birx stated. “I put mine on at 8 a.m. this morning and I’ve had it on ever since. I do this out of respect for each one of you but also I’ve been all across the U.S. in places where there have been a lot of virus.”

As of Monday’s 2 p.m. numbers from the Tennessee Department of Health, our state gained 2,553 new active cases overnight. Of particular concern is the fact that only 17 percent or 338 or 2,034 ICU beds are currently available for COVID-19 patients.

Dr. Birx also encouraged rural mayors to issue a mask mandate. Mayor Lewis said she felt strongly that a mandate wasn’t necessary in Moore County.

“At this point, we all know what our responsible role is in this fight – not only to wear a mask (correctly) but to also wash our hands regularly and keep a safe distance. I think most of us have adjusted to these actions,” Mayor Lewis told The Times. “Even though the governor has given the mayors the authority to issue a mask mandate I don’t think that is the best thing for me to do for Moore County. … Overwhelmingly I hear that our citizens are proud to be trusted to do the right thing and not be forced to do so.”

Mayor Lewis pointed to youth baseball and the public pool opening without incident or a spike in cases as an example of Moore County’s ability to do the common sense things.

“I don’t know if all are aware, but I allowed our youth to play ball this summer and have opened the public pool. To my knowledge, there has not been a problem with either.” 

Our friends at The Tennessean have posted Dr. Birx’s complete remarks on their Facebook page. Click here to view that video. •

{The Lynchburg Times is the only independently owned and operated newspaper in Lynchburg. We cover Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

Local small businesses encouraged to apply for Economic Disaster Loans

On Saturday morning, the front gate to the Jack Daniel’s Visitors Center remained locked and the usually bustling parking lot looked completely empty. Temporary closings at the distillery are affecting small businesses in Lynchburg. {Lynchburg Times Photo}

STATE NEWS — As cases in the state continue to increase daily, the Jack Daniel Visitors Center still has no idea when they’ll be able to lift the temporary shut down of public tours and re-open the Lynchburg Hardware and General Store and Miss Mary Bobo’s Restaurant. Without them, the steady stream of over 300,000 guest to our charming, little hamlet have slowed to a drip and many local business are feeling the crunch.

On Thursday, Governor Bill Lee announced that Tennessee received a declaration for Economic Injury Disaster, which gives Lynchburg small businesses the green light to apply for Small Business Administration (SBA) loans to help with losses from the COVID-19 situation.

“I applaud the efforts of the SBA in swiftly processing and approving Tennessee’s request for Economic Injury Disaster Loan assistance,” Lee said. “Small businesses and nonprofits across the state are suffering greatly in the wake of this pandemic, and these loans will help overcome the temporary loss of revenue companies are experiencing during this difficult time.”

The loans can be used to pay fixed debts, payroll, accounts payable or other bills that can’t be paid due to the disaster’s impact. Interest rates for the loans are 3.75 percent for small businesses and 2.75 percent for nonprofit organizations.

To apply online, visit the Disaster Assistance page on the U.S. Small Business Administration website, click here for a link. Lynchburg small businesses may also call SBA’s Customer Service Center at (800) 659-2955 or email disastercustomerservice@sba.gov for more information on SBA disaster assistance. •

The Lynchburg Times is the only independently owned and operated newspaper in Moore County … covering Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, the Lynchburg Music Fest, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

Governor Lee to visit LES on Friday

LOCAL NEWS — According to Moore County Director of Schools Chad Moorehead, Governor Bill Lee will visit Lynchburg Elementary School (LES) this Friday, October 11 for a tour and visit.

Governor Lee should arrive around 2 p.m. He’ll be greeted by LES Principal Eslick and our local legislators before touring the elementary school. He plans to pop by several classroom to visit one-on-one with both teachers and students. He plans to depart around 2:40 p.m. •

{The Lynchburg Times is an independently owned and operated newspaper that publishes new stories every morning. Covering Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}