Tims Ford plans evening canoe, kayak floats

Tims Ford State Park will offer an evening float for both canoers and kayakers on Friday. {File Photo}

FRANKLIN COUNTY — Floating on the picturesque Tims Ford Lake is always fun but a sunset float adds a bit of drama.

Officials at Tims Ford State Park in Franklin County plan an Evening Canoe Float and an Evening Kayak Float on Friday, August 7 from 7 to 8:30 p.m. Participants should meet at the Fairview Campground Check In Station. If you prefer to kayak, the state park will also host a Sunset Kayak Float at the same time.

Life jackets can be provided for either float for both adults and youths but the state park can not supply vest for children weighing under 50 pounds.

The cost of the Evening Canoe Float is $25 and you can register by clicking here. There were eight spots available at press time. The cost of the Evening Kayak Float is also $25 and you can register by clicking here. There were six spots available at press time.

For information about event at Tims Ford State Park visit their website or like their Facebook page. •

{The Lynchburg Times is the only independently owned and operated newspaper in Lynchburg. We cover Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

Nonprofit claims Manchester released raw sewage into the Duck River

{Editor’s Note: This is a breaking story and we will update here when more details become available.}

A non-profit organization is suing the City of Manchester for illegally dumping untreated sewage into the Duck River. {Photo Courtesy of the City of Manchester}

MANCHESTER — A state non-profit named Tennessee River Keeper filed a lawsuit against the City of Manchester on July 9 claiming the city has dumped nearly 34 million gallons of untreated sewage into the Duck River. Click here to view a copy of that complaint.

Tennessee River Keepers is filing the suit under the umbrella of the Clean Water Act. The group claims that the Manchester Sewage Treatment Plant has received over “336 violations within the past five years and over 33,930,595 gallons of untreated sewage” have been released. It also states that EPA records show over 50 sanitary sewer overflows from January to February 2020.

Tennessee Riverkeepers is seeking an immediate injunction and a $37,500 civil penalty along with their legal costs. •

Tennesseans now get discount at state parks

Need a break? Spend the night in one of Tennessee’s 56 state parks, including nearby Tims Ford, and get a discount as a Tennessee resident. {Photo Provided}

In March 2020, the world changed for most of us. Suddenly social distancing, quarantine, masks, and sanitizer became part of our daily lexicon. As the COVID-19 global pandemic forced many inside, others continue to look for ways to connect outdoors. It’s in that spirit that the Tennessee State Parks system decided to offer a new discount specifically for Tennessee residents.

On Wednesday, they announced a 10 percent Tennessee Resident Discount meant to encourage spending the night outdoors while making it more affordable. Tennessee is already just one of six U.S. states who do not charge an admission fee at state-sponsored parks.

“Our hope is that all Tennesseans – especially young adults, new residents, families with small kids, and price-sensitive travelers – will get outside and discover the beauty and wonder of your state parks,” said Deputy Commissioner of Parks and Conservation Jim Bryson. 

The discount is available to reserve a campsite, cabin, or lodge room at any Tennessee State Park including Tims Ford, Old Stone Fort, South Cumberland, and Henry Horton. To reserve a spot at one of 56 state parks, contact them by phone at 800-471-5295 or by clicking here. •

{The Lynchburg Times is the only independently owned and operated newspaper in Lynchburg. We cover Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

4 Things to Do This Weekend

A firefly hike at the botanical gardens, classic 80s flicks at the drive in, a new moon hike to Stone Door, and a blown glass exhibit at Cheekwood … yeah, there’s plenty of (socially distanced) things to do this weekend.

THURSDAY Firefly Garden Hike at Huntsville Botanical Garden: We are all trying to live our best life while socially distancing and outdoor events are sometimes a perfect fit. The Huntsville Botanical Garden offers a great opportunity this Thursday with their Firefly Garden Hike. The South’s most charming insect are most active right before sunset. The hike includes a walk through the garden as you learn about the firefly life cycle. Bring a jar so you can catch and release along the way. The hike starts at 7 p.m. Click here for more details.

THURSDAYGhostbusters, Karate Kid, Empire Strikes Back at the Drive In: Thursday will be the last day to catch a trio of classic 1980’s films back on the big screen. The Montana Drive In will play Ghostbusters (1984, rated PG), Karate Kid (1984, rated PG), and The Empire Strikes Back (1980, rated PG). For full coverage on these films, click here.

SUNDAYNew Moon Hike to Stone Door: Legend holds that 10 foot wide by 100 foot deep crack in the rock formation at South Cumberland State Park was once used by Native Americans as a passage way from the cliff to the gorge below during seasonal migration. The two mile round trip hike also offers scenic overlooks and a one-of-a-kind view of the new moon. Meet at Stone Door Road in Beersheeba Spring to a guided night hike with Ranger Spencer beginning at 8:30 p.m. Click here to register.

ALL WEEKENDChihuly Nights at Cheekwood: Imagine large-scale, blown glass sculptures in a gorgeous outdoor setting. It’s the perfect solution to feeling cooped up during social distancing. Chihuly Nights at Cheekwood will display the sculpture of American glass sculptor Dale Chihuly against the bright, southern night sky. Chihuly Nights happens on Thursday, Friday, Saturday, and Sunday for 5-10 p.m. To learn more, click here.

{The Lynchburg Times is the only independently owned and operated newspaper in Lynchburg. We cover Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

Once-in-a-lifetime comet visible in Moore County

Comet NEOWISE is a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to see a comet with the naked eye. It should be visible in Moore County through July 19. {Photo Provided}

It’s a once in a 6,800 year astronomical opportunity local stargazers won’t want to miss. Keep your eyes peeled now through July 19 for Comet NEOWISE as it makes a rare appearance that can be seen by the naked eye … but the window is closing quickly.

The three-mile wide comet began its trip near Earth on July 14. It is the first “great comet” to pass near Earth since the Hale-Bopp comet in 1997. The comet is named for the NASA mission that discovered it back in March. Its massive dust tail makes it appear as if it’s hurdling towards Earth … but don’t worry, it’s harmless.

According to local astronomer Billy Hix, the comet can be seen about an hour before sunrise or hour after sunset very low in the northern horizon.

“By July 19, it will be about two fist width (approximately 20 degrees) above the northwest horizon right after sunset. The comet is moving away from earth so it will be getting dimmer,” Hix said.

Luckily, rural areas without light pollution – like the rolling hills of Moore County – are the perfect place to view the comet. If you want to try and capture an image, use a tripod and a long exposure.

Newowise’s closest approach to Earth comes on July 22, at a distance of about 64 million miles. To view a NASA video on how to spot the comet, click here. To check out the International Space Station’s view of the one-in-a-lifetime comet, click here. •

{The Lynchburg Times is the only independently owned and operated newspaper in Lynchburg. We cover Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

5 Things to Do This Weekend

FridayFight Like a Girl Benefit for Breast Cancer at Twin Creeks Marina: Four female country music artist will play at Twin Creeks’ open air event center, The Honeysuckle, on Friday to perform for a good cause. Trick Pony’s Heidi Newfield, Anita Cochran, Suzanne Alexander, and Jamie O’Neal will play from 7-10 p.m. at the Fight Like a Girl Concert to benefit the Love Anchors Breast Cancer Fund. There will be limited seating due to social distancing. To get yours, click here. Doors will open at 5 p.m. For more information visit the event’s Facebook page.

FridayWaterfall Photography Class at Old Stone Fort:  Photographers love to take pics of waterfalls, but it’s a little more complicated than point and shoot. On July 10, David Duplessis of Tennessee Photographers will host an All Day Outdoor Waterfall Photography Class at Old Fort State Park in Manchester. Students should bring a DSLR camera, lenses, a tripod with shutter release, and wear clothing they don’t mind getting wet. There will be a small amount of hiking and since the class does not provide lunch or water, students should plan to bring their own. To learn more, click here.

FridayRolling Stones Havana Moon at Montana: In May 2016, the Rolling Stones played a historic concert in front of over 500,000 Cubans. It marked the first time a foreign rock band played an open-air concert in Cuba to a crowd that size. Director Paul Dugdale had the foresight to produce a concert film around it. That film, The Rolling Stone: Havana Moon, will play on Friday at the Montana Drive In. See our complete coverage here.

FridayNight Hike to Stone Door: Hiking to Stone Door at South Cumberland State Park is always fun but a guided night hike under a new moon is sure to be special. Ranger Spencer will guide this two mile hike through the beautiful Savage Gulf area. This hike is limited to the first 10 people to register and is $10 per person. Please meet the ranger at the Stone Door Station about 15 minutes before the start of the hike to check in. To register, click here.

SaturdayQuarantine Chameleon opening at Tullahoma Art Center: The COVID-19 quarantine has brought out a lot of unique expressions. On Saturday, local artist Joy Snead will open her Quarantine Chamelon show at the Tullahoma Art Center. The self-taught artist will show her works inspired by her time at home during the global pandemic. The opening takes place from 12-2 p.m. at the TAC located at 401 South Jackson Street. Click here for more details.

SundayBeginners Cookie Class at Promise Manor: Tullahoma-based small business Sami Kay’s Cookies will host a Beginner’s Cookie Class on Sunday at Promise Manor from 1-4 p.m. Students will learn tips, tricks, and secret to creating gorgeous iced cookies with a summer theme. To register for the event, click here.

Tims Ford plans outdoor survival school

Learn the keys to outdoor survival at Tim’s Ford Forged at the Ford. {File Photo}

FRANKLIN COUNTY — Think you could survive for three days and two nights on an island in Tims Ford Lake with just a handful of gear? Then you should definitely register for Forged at the Ford Outdoor Survival School, which will take place July 17-19. Registration ends on July 10, and there are limited spots available.

A Tims Ford Park Ranger will teach campers a variety of survival basics using minimal equipment and resources. Participants will learn friction fire, shelter building, knots, and more. During the three days, campers will live off the land by learning wild edible plants, trapping, fishing, and outdoor cooking. Rangers designed the program for all skill levels but campers must be at least 14 years old to attend and campers 14-17 years old must be accompanied by an adult.

The list of required gear includes a fixed blade knife, ferrocerium rod, screw top water bottle, hatchet or axe, 8×10 tarp, 50 feet of paracord, a flashlight or headlamp, a small metal pot, a sleeping bag, fishing line with assorted hooks, and a extra set of clothes in a waterproof container. Optional gear will include a hand saw, insect repellent, and a small first aid kit. All campers will be inventoried upon arrival.

Forged at the Ford is a rain or shine event. The price is $200 per camper. For more information, contact the Tims Ford Park Office at 931-958-3536 or visit their website. To register for the event, click here. •

{The Lynchburg Times is an independently owned and operated newspaper that publishes new stories every morning. Covering Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

Area state park plans waterfall photography class

Though they are a super popular subject, waterfalls can be tricky to shoot. Learn how at a outdoor and waterfall photography class on July 10. {Photo courtesy of Tennessee Photographs}

MANCHESTER — Photographers love to take pics of waterfalls, but it’s a little more complicated than point and shoot. You’ll need a DSLR camera, a tripod, and the patience for a long shutter release. On July 10, David Duplessis of Tennessee Photographers will host an All Day Outdoor and Waterfall Photography Class at Old Fort State Park in Manchester. Students should bring a DSLR camera, lenses, a tripod with shutter release, and wear clothing they don’t mind getting wet. There will be a small amount of hiking and since the class does not provide lunch or water, students should plan to bring their own.

“I was in this class and it was great. I highly recommend it. I had two or three, the light bulb went on moments in the first 15 minutes,” said J. Zalesak on the even’t Facebook page.

Students will meet at the Visitor’s Center at 8:15 a.m. and class will begin at 8:30 a.m. The state park is located at 732 Stone Fort Drive in Manchester. For more information, visit the event’s Facebook page by clicking here.•

{The Lynchburg Times is an independently owned and operated newspaper that publishes new stories every morning. Covering Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

Rattlesnake spotted at Normandy campsite

Folks visiting the Cedar Point Camping area in Normandy recently spotted a rattle snake. {Photo courtesy of Tara Mestrez via the Tennessee Snake Identification Page on Facebook}

NORMANDY — As COVID-19 numbers spike, more and more Moore Countians head outdoors for a little summer, socially-distanced fun. But if you camp near Cedar Point in Normandy be aware that campers have spotted large rattlesnakes in the area.

According to Tennessee wildlife officials, Timber Rattlesnakes are the largest and most venomous of the four venomous snakes found in our state including Timber Rattlesnakes, Pygmy Rattlesnakes, Copperheads, and Cottonmouths. Timber rattlers can grow up to six feet long and can be spotted easily by their large, triangular head, vertical pupils, and the characteristic rattle at the end of the tail.   

Colors vary greatly. Some Timber Rattlesnakes appear grey and light tan while others can look yellow and dark brown. According to wildlife officials, they prefer mature, heavily wooded forests with rocky, south-facing hillsides; often associated with bluffs or ledges.   They can also be found around mountains, swamps, cane thickets, wooded stream corridors, and rural habitats.   It is common to see Timber Rattlesnakes coiled near fallen logs or sunning on rocks.

According to TWRA officials, the rattle, which is used to warn predators, is tan or gray in color and consists of hollow, interlocking segments made of keratin. Newborn rattlesnakes have a single segment on its rattle, called a “button.” Each time the snake sheds a new segment is added to the base of the rattle. Shedding is variable and rattles break off, so counting the segments is not an accurate way to determine the age.

The snakes, even young ones, are extremely dangerous and contact should be avoided. However, wildlife officials remind locals that it is illegal to kill a Timber Rattlesnake unless it is a direct threat to you, your family, or your animals.

If you or someone in your party is bitten by a rattlesnake, you need to get to the closest hospital as soon as possible for a dose of antivenom. There is no on-the-scene intervention that is helpful.

For more information about Timber Rattlesnakes in Tennessee, visit the Tennessee Wildlife Resource Agency website by clicking here. •

{The Lynchburg Times is the only independently owned and operated newspaper in Moore County … covering Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, the Lynchburg Music Fest, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

State wildlife officials seek Moore County anglers public feedback

Moore County anglers can ask questions and give feedback during the TWRA online public meeting on July 9. {File Photo}

The Tennessee Wildlife Resource Agency (TWRA) announced this week that they plan three separate Facebook live events in the month of July to get public feedback about fishing in Tennessee. The three events will focus on three distinct regions of fishing in Tennessee. TWRA will discuss Middle Tennessee on Thursday, July 9 at 6:30 p.m. on the TWRA Facebook page.

West Tennessee will be discussed on July 14 at 6:30 p.m. (CDT) and East Tennessee on July 16 at 5:30 p.m. (CDT).

Moore County anglers can provide questions or comments in advance by emailing ask.twra@tn.gov, or on TWRA Facebook or Instagram via direct message during the event.

“We want to hear what people are experiencing on the water, what they like and don’t like, and any questions they might have,” said TWRA Fisheries Chief Frank Fiss. “We will have our local Fisheries managers available to answer questions during the event do our best to answer questions live.”

All meetings can easily be attended virtually and seen live on Facebook by clicking here. The TWRA encourages everyone to watch live and send in questions or comments before or during the meeting. There is no other option to attend these meetings due to COVID-19 restrictions on gatherings and social distancing requirements. •

{The Lynchburg Times is the only independently owned and operated newspaper in Moore County … covering Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, the Lynchburg Music Fest, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}