MC History: The Raider, Huntland Rivalry

{Editor’s Note: The annual Moore County versus Huntland rivalry game will be played on Friday in Huntland at 7 p.m.}

Make the mistake of saying native son Johnny Majors is from Huntland and any local will be quick to correct you. It’s a fact that the former UT football coach lived most of his early life in and is “from” Lynchburg … we don’t care what the UT media guides used to say. In fact, Majors Boulevard in Lynchburg pays tribute to the Majors family and their contributions to Moore County.

Johnny was born in 1935 to Shirley Inman and John Elizabeth Bobo Majors in Lynchburg. Shirley Majors played football at Moore County High School before coaching there from 1944-47. He left to restart the football program at Huntland High School. At the time, they hadn’t fielded a team in 20 years. He commuted each day from Moore County to Franklin County so that his children could continue to attend Moore County Schools. But that all came to an end one chilly fall night when Johnny and the MCHS Raiders beat his father’s Huntland Hornets 18-13 in the last regular season game.

Johnny Majors eighth grade yearbook picture … note the Lynchburg, TN. {Historical Photo}

“That’s the last dad-blamed time a son of mine plays against me,” he said, according to the State Archives.

After that, Shirley Majors packed up the family and moved to Huntland where Johnny finished his high school football career. It’s the genesis of an intense rivalry that remains today.

Over the years there have been lots of good-natured hi-jinx. Someone from the Huntland side once sent a black floral wreath to the Raiders prior to game day, according to former MCHS Cafeteria Manager Norma Stone.

Another local legend states the in 1993-94 a crew from Huntland supposedly snuck into Moore County and tagged local speed limit signs with a large “H” from MCHS to Huntland High School. “Occasionally, I will still see a sign with it still on there,” said native Christy Anderson.

Currently, the Raiders and the Hornets are neck and neck in Region 5A standings and each enjoys a 1-1 district record. The winner will likely move to the second spot behind Fayetteville City.

Kick off is at 7 p.m. If you can’t attend the game, it will be broadcast live on Raider Country 105.1 and 95.5 FM with Joe Abraham and the Moore County Sports Network, on the NFHS Network, or The Lynchburg Times will post live score updates on our Facebook page. •

{The Lynchburg Times is the only independently owned and operated newspaper in Lynchburg, Tennessee. We cover Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

The Unexpected Life of Jack Daniel

By Tabitha Evans Moore | Editor & Publisher

Unlike many brands with a larger-than-life namesake, Jack Daniel existed as a real person, one who walked the streets of Lynchburg. {Photo Courtesy of Jack Daniel’s Distillery}

Honeysuckle garland hangs around the sprawling front porch of a brick mansion situated on a bluff overlooking the East Fork of the Mulberry Creek. In the distance, you can see the lights of Lynchburg two miles away. Mercantile stores, a couple of saloons, a flour mill, a barrel factory, a tannery, a tin shop, and three blacksmiths — all thrive inside the Lynchburg city limits thanks, in part, to their business with the distillery.

Horses and carriages line the estate’s drive and a single Oldsmobile shines in the distance. That’s Jack’s car — the only automobile in town. The cool September night air carries the sound of children playing outside and music playing inside.

As the guests arrive, Elizabeth Motlow (Jack’s sister) and her husband, Connor, offer wide smiles and a beverage from a silver tray — a Tansy Julep (Jack’s favorite drink) or a healthy pour of Old No. 7 neat. Lemonade and cookies for the kids sits on a table out front.

Upstairs in the ballroom, a group of local musicians plays in the far left corner as Nearest Green sits nearby clapping, keeping time with the musicians, and encouraging the dancers. Jack intentionally placed his old friend’s table here. Nearest loves the pulse of the music. His sons, Eli and George, sit beside him with grinning bemusement.

It looks like the entire town is here and the walls line with smiling faces. As Jasper Newton — long known as Uncle Jack by this point — enters the room his infectious, larger-than-life presence commands the room.

He only stands five foot two but his signature outfit — a wide-brimmed country squire hat and formal, black, knee-length frock coat make him seem much taller. His bright, almond-shaped eye survey his friends and family and a sincere smile breaks out under the broad, full mustache that cascades over his top lip.

If we could have watched — local beverage in hand — as a Jasper Newton Daniel birthday party unfolded, it might have looked a lot like this.

Unlike many brands based on a personality, Jack Daniel’s Tennessee Whiskey springs from a real person … one who lived and breathed right here in Lynchburg. You’ve stood where he stood. You’ve seen what he saw.

The story Jack Daniel leaving home at a young age, living with Dan Call, meeting and learning whiskey-making from Nearest Green, and eventually launching a whiskey brand that would become world famous are now well known facts. What’s less well known is Jasper Newton or Uncle Jack the man his family and friends knew during his lifetime. To celebrate his birthday month, I decided to examine the unexpected life of Jasper Newton Daniel the man not Jack Daniel the brand.

“You know Jack was an amazing person, and everything we do today really flows out of what Jack was doing back then,” says unofficial Jack Daniel historian Nelson Eddy, of Finn Partners — Jack Daniel’s marketing and communications firm.

Eddy’s marketing presence at the distillery dates back 33 year to the days of tourism trailblazer and legendary storyteller Roger Brashears and Postcards from Lynchburg ad campaign creator, Art Hancock.

“The Motlow family hired Art and I considered him a mentor,” says Eddy. “Over the years, they shared files and information with me and that kind of led to this role.”

When we asked him what most people don’t know or might find surprising about Jasper Newton Daniel’s life, he had plenty to say.

Jack was likely born in 1848 not 1850

Though no one can definitively prove the actual birthday of Jack Daniel, September 1848 is a pretty good guess. It’s a date historians came to through deduction using the U.S. Census from those days and local oral histories as their guide.

“We knew the 1850 date on the Jack Daniel statue at the distillery was wrong based on the correct date of his mother’s death,” Eddy says.

Jack’s mother, Lucinda Cook Daniel died in 1849, not 1847, as it states on her tombstone at the Lynchburg Cemetery, according Nearest Green Distillery founder Fawn Weaver in her recent forward to Ben A. Green’s Jack Daniel’s Legacy.

“In piecing together all available information (including the original handwritten diary of Jack’s sister, Louisa, housed at the Albert Gore Research Center), I was able to determine Jack likely wrote a “9” at the end of his mother’s death year when ordering the gravestone marker and the monument mason mistakenly took the “9” for a “7,” she says.

According to Eddy, no one’s ever discovered Jasper Newton Daniels birth certificate and based on the times, it’s not a given that one existed. Birth certificates weren’t a requirement in the United States until after the turn of the century, and they cost money. With 10 children, Jack’s parents may not have filed one to save money, Eddy says.

“But we know that back then, the Census listed a person’s age as of their last birthday. If the June 1850 U.S. Census lists Jack’s as a one year old in September 1849 then his birth year must have been 1848.”

Jack Daniel and Nearest Green weren’t contemporaries

By now, everyone knows the genesis of Jack Daniel’s Tennessee Whiskey. Jack learned the famous Lincoln County Process from a Black slave on the Dan Call farm by the name of Nathan “Nearest” Green and by all accounts made him the first official Master Distiller when he purchased the Lois still from Call. Around 1884, Jack purchased a piece of property located near Cave Spring Hollow in Lynchburg and soon after, he introduced the world to his Old No. 7 Tennessee Whiskey.

Based on a historical photo from the early days at the Lynchburg distillery, many believe that Jack and Nearest were around the same age but that’s not true. By the time that photo was taken, Nearest had retired from the whiskey making business and returned to live on the Call’s farm.

Based on this historical photo from the early days of Jack Daniel’s Distillery in Lynchburg, many mistake the man seated to Jack’s right (left in the photo) as Nearest Green. According to family members, that’s actually George Green, Nearest’s son. {Historic photo courtesy of Jack Daniel’s Distillery}

“When Jack sets up at the cave spring in Lynchburg, Nearest stays with Dan Call in Lois on the farm,” says Eddy. “Jack then hires Green’s sons, Eli and George, to work at the distillery and we know from conversations with the Green family that that’s George seated to Jack’s right in that photo.”

“Just after the end of the Civil War, Jack’s relationship with the Green family was such that he sat George to his right in that photo, which would have been a position of honor,” Eddy says. “It was unheard of in that time period.”

Jack likely inherited his love of music from Uncle Nearest

Little Jack Daniel likely thought of Nearest Green like a favorite uncle and it’s well documented that Green’s influence on young Jack went well beyond whiskey making.

According to oral histories, Nearest Green played a mean fiddle and Dan Call often hosted dances on the farm with Nearest playing and Dan calling dances to the delight of the guests. It’s a tradition Jack Daniel continued as he became successful.

Jack Daniel’s home burned several years after his death, but in its day it existed as a mansion overlooking a bluff not far from where the Jack Daniel’s Distillery south processing plant sits now. He built a ballroom on the second floor of the house with a Steinway grand piano in the corner and often hosted community dances there, according to Eddy.

This exists as the only known photo of Jack Daniel’s home, which once sat on a bluff overlooking the East Fork of the Mulberry Creek near the old Lynchburg, Fayetteville Turnpike. You can see Jack’s brother-in-law, Connor Motlow, seated on the right side of the porch. The identity of the man holding the Tennessee Walking horse is not known. {Photo Courtesy of Jack Daniel’s Distillery}

“That mutual love of music is probably the reason why Jack Daniel decides to outfit the Mr. Jack Daniel’s Original Silver Cornet Band,” says Eddy.

Jack Daniel loved speed

Both Eddy and Ben Green’s Legacy book paint a picture of a young Jack Daniel with energy to spare and no time to sit by idly.

From oral histories, we know that young Jack Daniel ran instead of walked nearly everywhere he went. He loved speed and he loved horses, of which he owned many. In fact, Jack Daniel mounted on a horse became a familiar sight not only Moore County but also Coffee County, Flat Creek, and beyond.

Whether he was riding alone, in a wagon delivering whiskey, in a buggy behind speedy horse, Jack Daniel was on the move. Horse riding eventually developed into experiencing horse-power as Jack Daniel was rumored to have owned the very first automobile in the county.

“It makes sense,” says Eddy. “He would have been the wealthiest man in the county and he has a love of speed.”

Jack Daniel lived as a true, southern gentleman

According to Eddy, Jasper Newton Daniel lived much like a Gentleman Jack of his time. He loved to joke and had a great sense of humor. He courted (though unsuccessfully) and threw great parties.

“He was a genuinely good guy in an industry filled with unsavory characters,” Weaver states in her Legacy preface.

He also exuded a certain dapper sense of style: formal, black knee-length frock coat, fawn-colored, silk-lined vest, broad tie, trimmed mustache and goatee, topped with a country squire hat. Even if you had not known who he was exactly, he would have stood out in a crowd.

Though he left school early, Jack Daniel received an education thanks to the persistence of Dan Call’s wife, Mary Jane.

Many people think of Jack Daniel as uneducated, but we know that not to be true, says Eddy. He loved to read and cherished his books — writing his name in them several times so that they’d always find their way home.

“One book we know he owned because it exists today with his name written in it is a copy of Ben Hur, a book written by a Lew Wallace a former Union general in 1880,” says Eddy.

Known around town as The Donations Man, Jack Daniel financed many a church project, farm, businesses, and family emergency. He was known to give lavish birthday and wedding presents and often loaned money even though he knew there was little change he’d be repaid. It’s a local legend that Jack Daniel financed every church in Moore County — save the one that refused money from that “whiskey maker.”

“It is said that he would have died a poor man if his nephews, Lem and Tom Motlow, had not helped him conserve some resources,” Green writes in the Legacy book.

In the end, Eddy says Jack Daniel lived more like a Apple’s Steve Jobs than inventor Thomas Edison.

“He didn’t invent whiskey making or the Lincoln County Process,” says Eddy. “Charcoal mellowing was just the ways things were done back then and it was likely brought over from Africa as a slave tradition.”

Eddy says fifteen other people in Moore County were making whiskey at the same time Jack Daniel made whiskey and they all used the Lincoln County Process. Jack Daniel just did it better. He changed out his charcoal vats often resulting in an award-winning product known for its “pureness and exceptional quality.”

It’s the same product (though slightly lower proofed) made the same way that sits on liquor store shelves today. So, as September comes to an end, grab a bottle of the original Old No. 7, pour yourself a generous glass, and a raise a toast to Jasper Newton Daniel — a Lynchburg original. •

{The Lynchburg Times is the only independently owned and operated newspaper in Lynchburg, Tennessee. We cover Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

Even with social distance precautions, charm unchanged at Miss Mary Bobo’s Restaurant

Miss Mary Bobo’s Restaurant sits inside a historic Greek Revival home that originates back to a time before even the distillery existed. It’s dining with a slice of southern culture served with a side of local history.
Miss Mary Bobo’s Restaurant sits inside a historic Greek Revival home that originates back to a time before even the distillery existed. It’s dining with a slice of southern culture served with a side of local history. {Lynchburg Times Photo}

Written by Tabitha Evans Moore | Editor & Publisher

In ordinary times, lunch at Miss Mary Bobo’s Restaurant in Lynchburg isn’t just a meal … it’s a slice of southern culture served with a side of local history. Diners pass heaping platters of Lynchburg favorites around large tables, family-style, as local hostesses regale with tales about Jack Daniel, the Motlow family, and Miss Mary Bobo herself.

In March, the local restaurant closed it’s doors along with public tours at the distillery and the Lynchburg Hardware and General Store due to the COVID-19 global pandemic. Ever mindful of not only its local but also global interest, Jack Daniel’s parent company, Brown-Forman, decided to shut down the marketing side of the distillery while continuing to make whiskey in the hollow — but with a few extra precautions.

In July, Miss Mary Bobo’s re-opened but with some social distanced changes to make sure everyone – from its local staff to its guest from Lynchburg Tennessee, the U.S., and around world – stayed safe. You’ll get your temperature checked at the door. Masks are available for anyone that doesn’t already have one and hand sanitizer is at the ready. The long, family style tables are gone, replaced by smaller, antique tables and chair. Seating is a bit more limited, so you’ll probably want to make a reservation.

Today things are a little different … but just as charming.

A slice of local history

Miss Mary Bobo’s exists as one part restaurant and one part museum of Jack Daniel’s storied history in the community. Framed copies of Arnold Worldwide’s famous Postcard from Lynchburg ad campaign grace multiple walls along with historic photos. It’s one of the longest-running advertising campaigns in history featuring both local characters like Mayor Bonnie Lewis and famous faces like Frank Sinatra and Queen Victoria.

Even the restaurant itself is a slice of local history, as it existed well before Jack Daniel licensed his now famous distillery in the hollow in 1866. Originally built in 1820 around a natural spring that still exists on the property, the two story Greek Revival building possesses a certain unmistakable charm.

Miss Mary, her husband, and two children bought the home from the Salmon family in early 1900 and turned the unused bedrooms into rooms for rent. One of her most famous (and most frequent) boarders was Tom Motlow, Lem Motlow’s younger brother and the founder of Farmer’s Bank. He boarded at Miss Mary’s for more than 40 years until he died at the age of 96.

Miss Mary continued to host boarders until 1970 and continued to oversee the kitchen right up until her death in June 1983 just one month shy of her 102 birthday. Jack Daniel’s Distillery bought the house soon after and re-opened it as a public restaurant in May 1984.

Southern charm and social distancing

So what’s it’s like to eat at Miss Mary Bobo’s without storytellers at the head of each table. We decided to grab a reader, Jill Estfon, the winner of our Lunch with the Editor contest and find out.

For the time being, guests dine at smaller, more intimate tables spaced further apart. Instead of family-style presentation, one of Miss Mary’s scholarships students serves each table. If you aren’t familiar, the restaurant boasts a long history of supporting Moore County students. Each scholarship student is a MCHS graduate attending Motlow State Community College while Jack Daniel’s provides the work experience, books, and labs fees.

The service is friendly, attentive, and completely unobtrusive. Servers wear masks for guests protection. The tables, each adorned with fresh flowers grown by Miss Mary’s Bobo’s manager Debbie Baxter, still feel like Sunday morning.

During our visit, Jill and I were seated in the far left corner of the Evans Room. It didn’t take us long to strike up a conversation with Chris visiting from Salt Lake City across the room. It seems whether hostesses are seated at the head of the table or not the restaurant still inspires meeting and mingling … even at a distance.

“I love the pace and the ability to just sit and enjoy a meal,” he said.

A taste of Lynchburg

Though the menu changes often, crispy, southern-style fried chicken is often on it. Diners choose from a meat, and two or three sides. All meals come with bread and iced tea. {Photo Credit: Laura Zimbrick for Miss Mary Bobo’s}

Miss Mary’s menu changes frequently and features two meats, five sides to choose from, fresh-baked bread, and iced tea. Dessert is optional. All meals are created by a culinary team headed by Jack Daniel’s great great-grand nephew, Chris Dickey. Entrees include items like Boarding House Meatloaf, Southern Fried Chicken, Chicken Pastry, Fried Catfish, and Country-Style BBQ Ribs. On our visit, Jill enjoyed the meatloaf while I dug into the fried chicken.

“The meatloaf tastes super moist with a tangy, spicy bit of heat,” Jill said.

You can get a taste of our famous local product at the distillery. You can also get a southern-inspired taste at Miss Mary Bobo’s. The Lynchburg Candied Apples made with a touch a Jack Daniel’s Tennessee Whiskey is a must if you want the full Lynchburg experience.

Other sides include seasoned greens, fried okra, broccoli rice casserole, macaroni and cheese, mashed potatoes and, of course, every meal is served with a fresh-baked biscuit or cornbread.

Our Lunch with Editor winner, Jill Estfon, raved about Miss Mary Bobo’s fudge pie recipe. “This is on par with what my grandmother made,” she said. {Lynchburg Times Photo}

For dessert, Jill and I both enjoyed the Fudge Pie topped with homemade whipped cream.

“My grandmother set a high bar,” Jill said. “This fudge pie is on par with what my grandmother, Elizabeth Smith, used to make.”

Other featured desserts include chess, pecan, oatmeal, or buttermilk pies.

Miss Mary Bobo’s Restaurant is located just off the historic Lynchburg Square at 295 Main Street. Seatings are generally available every 15 minutes from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Monday through Saturday but reservations are highly recommended and can be made at 931-759-7394.

They also boast an impressive gift shop perfect for a little early Christmas shopping. For more information, check out their Facebook page or visit the Jack Daniel’s website. •

{The Lynchburg Times is the only independently owned and operated newspaper in Lynchburg. We cover Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

Local historian seeks info about Capley’s Garage and The Red Hall

Local historian George Stone is looking for information about Capley’s Garage and the Red Hall that stood directly behind it. {Historic Photo Provided}

Even before the days of Jack Daniel’s Distillery, whiskey making has always been a principal industry in Moore County. In fact by 1877, there were as many as 23 distilleries operating in the county, according to local historians. The largest of these was the Eaton Tolley Distillery at County Line. They aged some of their whiskey in the The Red Hall, a large warehouse that sat directly behind what was then Capley’s Garage and today houses Indian Motorcycle’s Lynchburg Garage. Local historian George Stone is seeking info and in particular a good photos of both historic buildings.

Capley’s Garage once sat where Indian Motorcycle’s Lynchburg Garage now sits. The Red Hall would have been located directly behind it. {Lynchburg Times Photo}

“I do not know when the building was torn down or destroyed. I am hoping someone can tell me,” said Stone. “I also hope someone may have a complete photo of only the Red Hall.”

George Stone is a member of the Moore County Historical Society. You can reach him through their public Facebook Group by clicking here. •

{The Lynchburg Times is the only independently owned and operated newspaper in Lynchburg. We cover Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

American Pickers headed to southern, middle Tennessee in June

Frank Fritz and Mike Wolfe of American Pickers will be in our area in June. {Photo Provided}

They adore traveling the rural back roads looking for dusty barns and piles of grimy junk to explore. Why? Because there might just be a rare vintage find or a forgotten relic just begging to be restored.

American Pickers, Mike Wolfe and Frank Fritz, will be headed toward southern, middle Tennessee in June. And hey, if you’ve got interesting stuff they might just visit you. The duo are looking for items to show off on there oh-so-popular History Channel show. If you or someone you know has unique items you’d be willing to share, you should contact them via email, phone, or on Facebook to be considered.

The duo only explores private collections so they won’t be interested in retail stores, malls, flea markets, museums, auction, or any business that’s open to the general public.

You can contact them via email at americanpickers@cineflix.com, leave them a voicemail at 855-old-rust, or message them on their Facebook page. To be considered let them know your name, location, phone number, where your collection is located,and a description of the items.

They also own a retail store in Nashville called Antique Archaeology that sells vintage items, collectibles, and unique home decor all picked personally by Mike. It’s located at 1300 Clinton Street. •

{The Lynchburg Times is an independently owned and operated newspaper that publishes new stories every morning. Covering Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

Promise Manor featured on Tennessee Crossroads

Lynchburg’s Igniter Productions shot a music promo at Promise Manor in January. The local historic home and private events venue will be featured on Tennessee Crossroads this week. {Photo Provided}

LOCAL NEWS — If you’ve exhausted your Netflix cue recently, one of Lynchburg’s own will be on the small screen beginning Thursday night.

National Public Television’s Tennessee Crossroads will feature local historic home turned special events venue Promise Manor this week. The episodes will air on Thursday, March 26 at 7 p.m. or Sunday, March 29 at 10 a.m.

The first episode of Tennessee Crossroad aired in 1987. Since then, they’ve been crisscrossing the state highways and back roads highlighting the people, places, food, events, and crafts that make our state unique. In the past, they’ve featured other Lynchburg locales like Barrel House BBQ, the Lynchburg Cake and Candy Company, Miss Mary Bobo’s Restaurant, and others.

Birdie Evans, the mother of Mary Evans Bobo of Miss Mary Bobo’s fame, on the porch at what would become Promise Manor. {Historic Photo}

Promise Manor exists in the historic Green-Evans-Hudgens House on Motlow Barns Road. The NPT crew stopped by to chat with venue owners Dennis and Kayla White last November. The 1850-era home was once the home of Birdie Evans – the mother of Miss Mary Evans Bobo’s for whom Lynchburg’s famous restaurant is named.

The charming locals venue hosts baby showers, bridal showers, weddings, and other private and public special events. It’s built in the Greek Revival style and feature historic murals, and sprawling, landscaped grounds.

To learn more about them, visit their Facebook page or website. If you happen to miss the NPT airing of the episode, you can watch it at the Tennessee Crossroads website. •

{The Lynchburg Times is an independently owned and operated newspaper that publishes new stories every morning. Covering Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

New website honors life’s work of state naturalist

State Naturalist Mack Prichard
Tennessee State Naturalist Emeritus Mack Prichard reviews the new MackPrichard.org website, which chronicles his presentations, photos and writings. {Photo Provided}

By Susan Campbell | Contributing Writer

STATE NEWS — The Friends of South Cumberland (FSC) recently launched a new website that chronicles and celebrates the work of Tennessee State Naturalist Emeritus Mack Prichard.

MackPrichard.org is a free website that serves as a repository for Prichard’s decades of work with the state, including his presentations, photos and writings. The website has been designed to assist environmental education in the state.

In 2014, the FSC began working with Prichard to preserve part of his vast collection of photographs taken during his nearly five decade career with the State of Tennessee, according to FSC’s Rick Dreves. More than 5,000 photographs, more than a dozen videos of Prichard’s presentations, and additional digitized materials are now online, chronicling the evolution of environmental protection across the state, and showing many places and events that led to the creation of new state natural areas and state parks.

“The objective of the project was to share Prichard’s experiences and knowledge online, both as a record of his work, and to inspire and inform environmental educators, researchers and the broader public,” Dreves said.

The project gained momentum when the FSC received a grant from the Tennessee Federation of Garden Clubs (TFGC) to support the purchase of scanning equipment, data storage, web services and, most recently, funding for a student assistant to help accelerate the scanning of slide images from Prichard’s collection.

“Work to augment the online resources will be ongoing, as both Prichard’s archives and knowledge are deep and of great value to environmental education in Tennessee,” Dreves said.

Prichard has had a long association with both organizations. He was instrumental in persuading then-governor Winfield Dunn to advocate for creation of South Cumberland State Park in 1978, and for the establishment of FSC in the 1990s. For years, Prichard was a speaker at TFGC’s summer camp sessions, showing slides and speaking about conservation topics from across the state. The TFGC gave Mack the nickname, “Mr. Conservation,” and established its Conservation Education Fund to help preserve his collection.

The FSC is coordinating efforts with a parallel effort being undertaken in Nashville, where the Friends of Tennessee State Parks (FTSP) have provided a separate grant to scan other slides from Prichard’s collection. FSC hopes to add those images to the new website, when they become available.

For more information about Prichard and these organizations, visit MackPrichard.org, FriendsOfSouthCumberland.org, TFGConline.org and FriendsOfTennesseeStateParks.org.

{The Lynchburg Times is an independently owned and operated newspaper that publishes new stories every morning. Covering Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

New Frist exhibit explores 2010 Nashville Flood

The Cumberland River overflowed its banks in 2010, causing floodwaters to rise around the riverfront area and several blocks of downtown Nashville. May 3, 2010.  {Photo Courtesy of  Larry McCormack for The Tennessean.}

Nashville — Over two days in 2010, record-breaking amounts of rainfall fell across Middle Tennessee. The already swollen Cumberland River eventually crested almost 12 feet above flood stage, while smaller tributaries also flooded. That water poured from its banks into the homes and businesses of downtown Nashville including placed like the iconic Grand Ole Opry, the Opryland Hotel, and the Schermerhorn Symphony Center. Over 25 people died in the region and including 11 in Nashville.

It rattled the lives of untold numbers of people and brought a community together. On January 10, The Frist Museum in Nashville opened The Nashville Flood: Ten Years Later, an exhibit of photographs and oral histories from ten different Nashville neighborhoods including Antioch, Belle Meade, Bellevue, Bordeaux, and others, in addition to downtown. The majority of the items for the exhibit come from the Nashville Public Library and The Tennessean. An interactive monitor also illustrates the long-term impact of the flood by pairing photographs from 2010 with ones from 2020. 

The exhibit will remain on display through May 17 in the Conte Community Arts Gallery. For more information, visit The Frist website. •

{The Lynchburg Times is an independently owned and operated newspaper that publishes new stories every morning. Covering Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

Oakland Mansion’s Wedding Dresses through the Decades ends March 1

This vintage wedding dress features nine layers for fullness in the skirt and 27 covered buttons down the back. It was owned by Peggy Ann Westbrooks Cranker of Murfreesboro. {Photos Provided}

REGIONAL NEWS | Murfreesboro — Whether you’re a history buff or a student of fashion and design, the annual Wedding Dresses through History event at the historic Oakland Mansion is sure to pique your interests. Organizers have collected dresses from around southern, middle Tennessee in a exhibit that explores women’s history, fashion history, cultural history and the history of our community.  Over 50 gowns will be on display … many for the first time.

The exhibit opens on January 17 and will continue through March 1. It will take place in the Maney Hall of the Oakland Mansions, which is located at 900 North Maney Avenue in Murfreesboro. The exhibit will be open daily, Monday through Saturday 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. and Sundays 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. Admission to the exhibit is $10 per person and is open to the public. For more information, visit the exhibit’s Facebook page of visit the Oakland Mansion website. •

{The Lynchburg Times is an independently owned and operated newspaper that publishes new stories every morning. Covering Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

Uncle Nearest earns Most Awarded American Whiskey of 2019

Uncle Nearest 1820 Single Barrel Whsikey
Whiskey expert Fred Minnick chose Uncle Nearest 1820 Single Barrel as one of his Top 5 Whiskeys of 2019 during his recent reveal live stream. {Photo Courtesy of Nearest Green Distillery}

When globally recognized whiskey critic, Fred Minnick, unveils his yearly Top American Whiskeys picks … industry folks and the general public tend to pay attention. He’s a Wall Street Journal best-selling author and whiskey reviewer known for his exquisite palate. So when, during his annual live stream, he blind tasted 35 whiskeys and chose Uncle Nearest’s 1820 Single Barrel Whiskey his third top pick … well, glasses were raised in Shelbyville.

After he’d revealed his pick, even Minnick himself seemed surprised stating, “That is kind of an upset … It’s a whiskey out of Tennessee and they are absolutely pushing the needle…” 

1820 Single Barrel was the only non-Kentucky whiskey among the select group, surprising a lot of industry insiders who’ve long sworn that the best whiskeys hail from the Bluegrass State.

It’s one of several awards.

Uncle Nearest Premium Whiskey spent the entire year of 2019 quietly racking up top awards in spirit competitions and industry publications around the globe, including 10 Best in Class and Best in Show, and 25 Platinum, Double Gold and Gold medals. Jim Murray’s Whiskey Bible rated 1820 Single Barrel Whiskey a 94.5, the highest score for a Tennessee whiskey or bourbon. He is joined by the more than 10 other industry leaders who rated Uncle Nearest’s three labels – 1856 Premium Aged Whiskey, 1820 Single Barrel Whiskey and 1884 Small Batch Whiskey – between 90-96, with an overall industry-wide rating of 92.6.

For the third year in a row, Cigar & Spirits Magazine named Uncle Nearest its No. 1 whiskey from Tennessee, awarding the brand a Double Gold medal for its 1856 Premium Aged Whiskey, a Double Gold medal for its 1820 Single Barrel and a Gold medal for its 1884 Small Batch expression. The Ultimate Spirits Challenge awarded the brand a Chairman’s Trophy, its highest honor.

At the New Orleans World Bourbon Festival, in a room full of the most elite American whiskey brands, Uncle Nearest Premium Whiskey was crowned Best American Whiskey. The World Whiskies Awards hosted by Whisky Magazine named the brand an Icon of Whisky, bestowing its highest honor of World’s Best (a title it shared with a top Kentucky Bourbon).

The SIP Awards, the only internationally recognized consumer judging spirits competition, handed Uncle Nearest two Double Gold medals, a Best in Class award, a Gold medal and a Consumers’ Choice award. At the China Wine & Spirits Awards, 1884 Small Batch Whiskey took home a Double Gold medal making it the Top American Whiskey at the biggest and most prestigious wine and spirits competition in China. Uncle Nearest 1884 also took home a Double Gold medal at the 2019 Sommelier Challenge International Wine & Spirits Competition hosted by Robert Whitley. For the North American Whiskey Tasting, powered by the Beverage Testing Institute, Uncle Nearest 1856 took home a Platinum medal, the competition’s biggest award.

“When my great-great-grandfather, Nearest Green, was alive, his whiskey was known to be the best,” said Victoria Eady Butler, master blender for Uncle Nearest. “We know this because in all the Nashville papers, the distributors would discount every whiskey from Tennessee and Kentucky on Fridays to drum up business. The only whiskey that was never discounted, and I mean never from what we have found, was the whiskey my great-great-grandfather was making.” •

{The Lynchburg Times is an independently owned and operated newspaper that publishes new stories every morning. Covering Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}