American Pickers headed to southern, middle Tennessee in June

Frank Fritz and Mike Wolfe of American Pickers will be in our area in June. {Photo Provided}

They adore traveling the rural back roads looking for dusty barns and piles of grimy junk to explore. Why? Because there might just be a rare vintage find or a forgotten relic just begging to be restored.

American Pickers, Mike Wolfe and Frank Fritz, will be headed toward southern, middle Tennessee in June. And hey, if you’ve got interesting stuff they might just visit you. The duo are looking for items to show off on there oh-so-popular History Channel show. If you or someone you know has unique items you’d be willing to share, you should contact them via email, phone, or on Facebook to be considered.

The duo only explores private collections so they won’t be interested in retail stores, malls, flea markets, museums, auction, or any business that’s open to the general public.

You can contact them via email at americanpickers@cineflix.com, leave them a voicemail at 855-old-rust, or message them on their Facebook page. To be considered let them know your name, location, phone number, where your collection is located,and a description of the items.

They also own a retail store in Nashville called Antique Archaeology that sells vintage items, collectibles, and unique home decor all picked personally by Mike. It’s located at 1300 Clinton Street. •

{The Lynchburg Times is an independently owned and operated newspaper that publishes new stories every morning. Covering Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

Promise Manor featured on Tennessee Crossroads

Lynchburg’s Igniter Productions shot a music promo at Promise Manor in January. The local historic home and private events venue will be featured on Tennessee Crossroads this week. {Photo Provided}

LOCAL NEWS — If you’ve exhausted your Netflix cue recently, one of Lynchburg’s own will be on the small screen beginning Thursday night.

National Public Television’s Tennessee Crossroads will feature local historic home turned special events venue Promise Manor this week. The episodes will air on Thursday, March 26 at 7 p.m. or Sunday, March 29 at 10 a.m.

The first episode of Tennessee Crossroad aired in 1987. Since then, they’ve been crisscrossing the state highways and back roads highlighting the people, places, food, events, and crafts that make our state unique. In the past, they’ve featured other Lynchburg locales like Barrel House BBQ, the Lynchburg Cake and Candy Company, Miss Mary Bobo’s Restaurant, and others.

Birdie Evans, the mother of Mary Evans Bobo of Miss Mary Bobo’s fame, on the porch at what would become Promise Manor. {Historic Photo}

Promise Manor exists in the historic Green-Evans-Hudgens House on Motlow Barns Road. The NPT crew stopped by to chat with venue owners Dennis and Kayla White last November. The 1850-era home was once the home of Birdie Evans – the mother of Miss Mary Evans Bobo’s for whom Lynchburg’s famous restaurant is named.

The charming locals venue hosts baby showers, bridal showers, weddings, and other private and public special events. It’s built in the Greek Revival style and feature historic murals, and sprawling, landscaped grounds.

To learn more about them, visit their Facebook page or website. If you happen to miss the NPT airing of the episode, you can watch it at the Tennessee Crossroads website. •

{The Lynchburg Times is an independently owned and operated newspaper that publishes new stories every morning. Covering Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

New website honors life’s work of state naturalist

State Naturalist Mack Prichard
Tennessee State Naturalist Emeritus Mack Prichard reviews the new MackPrichard.org website, which chronicles his presentations, photos and writings. {Photo Provided}

By Susan Campbell | Contributing Writer

STATE NEWS — The Friends of South Cumberland (FSC) recently launched a new website that chronicles and celebrates the work of Tennessee State Naturalist Emeritus Mack Prichard.

MackPrichard.org is a free website that serves as a repository for Prichard’s decades of work with the state, including his presentations, photos and writings. The website has been designed to assist environmental education in the state.

In 2014, the FSC began working with Prichard to preserve part of his vast collection of photographs taken during his nearly five decade career with the State of Tennessee, according to FSC’s Rick Dreves. More than 5,000 photographs, more than a dozen videos of Prichard’s presentations, and additional digitized materials are now online, chronicling the evolution of environmental protection across the state, and showing many places and events that led to the creation of new state natural areas and state parks.

“The objective of the project was to share Prichard’s experiences and knowledge online, both as a record of his work, and to inspire and inform environmental educators, researchers and the broader public,” Dreves said.

The project gained momentum when the FSC received a grant from the Tennessee Federation of Garden Clubs (TFGC) to support the purchase of scanning equipment, data storage, web services and, most recently, funding for a student assistant to help accelerate the scanning of slide images from Prichard’s collection.

“Work to augment the online resources will be ongoing, as both Prichard’s archives and knowledge are deep and of great value to environmental education in Tennessee,” Dreves said.

Prichard has had a long association with both organizations. He was instrumental in persuading then-governor Winfield Dunn to advocate for creation of South Cumberland State Park in 1978, and for the establishment of FSC in the 1990s. For years, Prichard was a speaker at TFGC’s summer camp sessions, showing slides and speaking about conservation topics from across the state. The TFGC gave Mack the nickname, “Mr. Conservation,” and established its Conservation Education Fund to help preserve his collection.

The FSC is coordinating efforts with a parallel effort being undertaken in Nashville, where the Friends of Tennessee State Parks (FTSP) have provided a separate grant to scan other slides from Prichard’s collection. FSC hopes to add those images to the new website, when they become available.

For more information about Prichard and these organizations, visit MackPrichard.org, FriendsOfSouthCumberland.org, TFGConline.org and FriendsOfTennesseeStateParks.org.

{The Lynchburg Times is an independently owned and operated newspaper that publishes new stories every morning. Covering Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

New Frist exhibit explores 2010 Nashville Flood

The Cumberland River overflowed its banks in 2010, causing floodwaters to rise around the riverfront area and several blocks of downtown Nashville. May 3, 2010.  {Photo Courtesy of  Larry McCormack for The Tennessean.}

Nashville — Over two days in 2010, record-breaking amounts of rainfall fell across Middle Tennessee. The already swollen Cumberland River eventually crested almost 12 feet above flood stage, while smaller tributaries also flooded. That water poured from its banks into the homes and businesses of downtown Nashville including placed like the iconic Grand Ole Opry, the Opryland Hotel, and the Schermerhorn Symphony Center. Over 25 people died in the region and including 11 in Nashville.

It rattled the lives of untold numbers of people and brought a community together. On January 10, The Frist Museum in Nashville opened The Nashville Flood: Ten Years Later, an exhibit of photographs and oral histories from ten different Nashville neighborhoods including Antioch, Belle Meade, Bellevue, Bordeaux, and others, in addition to downtown. The majority of the items for the exhibit come from the Nashville Public Library and The Tennessean. An interactive monitor also illustrates the long-term impact of the flood by pairing photographs from 2010 with ones from 2020. 

The exhibit will remain on display through May 17 in the Conte Community Arts Gallery. For more information, visit The Frist website. •

{The Lynchburg Times is an independently owned and operated newspaper that publishes new stories every morning. Covering Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

Oakland Mansion’s Wedding Dresses through the Decades ends March 1

This vintage wedding dress features nine layers for fullness in the skirt and 27 covered buttons down the back. It was owned by Peggy Ann Westbrooks Cranker of Murfreesboro. {Photos Provided}

REGIONAL NEWS | Murfreesboro — Whether you’re a history buff or a student of fashion and design, the annual Wedding Dresses through History event at the historic Oakland Mansion is sure to pique your interests. Organizers have collected dresses from around southern, middle Tennessee in a exhibit that explores women’s history, fashion history, cultural history and the history of our community.  Over 50 gowns will be on display … many for the first time.

The exhibit opens on January 17 and will continue through March 1. It will take place in the Maney Hall of the Oakland Mansions, which is located at 900 North Maney Avenue in Murfreesboro. The exhibit will be open daily, Monday through Saturday 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. and Sundays 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. Admission to the exhibit is $10 per person and is open to the public. For more information, visit the exhibit’s Facebook page of visit the Oakland Mansion website. •

{The Lynchburg Times is an independently owned and operated newspaper that publishes new stories every morning. Covering Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

Uncle Nearest earns Most Awarded American Whiskey of 2019

Uncle Nearest 1820 Single Barrel Whsikey
Whiskey expert Fred Minnick chose Uncle Nearest 1820 Single Barrel as one of his Top 5 Whiskeys of 2019 during his recent reveal live stream. {Photo Courtesy of Nearest Green Distillery}

When globally recognized whiskey critic, Fred Minnick, unveils his yearly Top American Whiskeys picks … industry folks and the general public tend to pay attention. He’s a Wall Street Journal best-selling author and whiskey reviewer known for his exquisite palate. So when, during his annual live stream, he blind tasted 35 whiskeys and chose Uncle Nearest’s 1820 Single Barrel Whiskey his third top pick … well, glasses were raised in Shelbyville.

After he’d revealed his pick, even Minnick himself seemed surprised stating, “That is kind of an upset … It’s a whiskey out of Tennessee and they are absolutely pushing the needle…” 

1820 Single Barrel was the only non-Kentucky whiskey among the select group, surprising a lot of industry insiders who’ve long sworn that the best whiskeys hail from the Bluegrass State.

It’s one of several awards.

Uncle Nearest Premium Whiskey spent the entire year of 2019 quietly racking up top awards in spirit competitions and industry publications around the globe, including 10 Best in Class and Best in Show, and 25 Platinum, Double Gold and Gold medals. Jim Murray’s Whiskey Bible rated 1820 Single Barrel Whiskey a 94.5, the highest score for a Tennessee whiskey or bourbon. He is joined by the more than 10 other industry leaders who rated Uncle Nearest’s three labels – 1856 Premium Aged Whiskey, 1820 Single Barrel Whiskey and 1884 Small Batch Whiskey – between 90-96, with an overall industry-wide rating of 92.6.

For the third year in a row, Cigar & Spirits Magazine named Uncle Nearest its No. 1 whiskey from Tennessee, awarding the brand a Double Gold medal for its 1856 Premium Aged Whiskey, a Double Gold medal for its 1820 Single Barrel and a Gold medal for its 1884 Small Batch expression. The Ultimate Spirits Challenge awarded the brand a Chairman’s Trophy, its highest honor.

At the New Orleans World Bourbon Festival, in a room full of the most elite American whiskey brands, Uncle Nearest Premium Whiskey was crowned Best American Whiskey. The World Whiskies Awards hosted by Whisky Magazine named the brand an Icon of Whisky, bestowing its highest honor of World’s Best (a title it shared with a top Kentucky Bourbon).

The SIP Awards, the only internationally recognized consumer judging spirits competition, handed Uncle Nearest two Double Gold medals, a Best in Class award, a Gold medal and a Consumers’ Choice award. At the China Wine & Spirits Awards, 1884 Small Batch Whiskey took home a Double Gold medal making it the Top American Whiskey at the biggest and most prestigious wine and spirits competition in China. Uncle Nearest 1884 also took home a Double Gold medal at the 2019 Sommelier Challenge International Wine & Spirits Competition hosted by Robert Whitley. For the North American Whiskey Tasting, powered by the Beverage Testing Institute, Uncle Nearest 1856 took home a Platinum medal, the competition’s biggest award.

“When my great-great-grandfather, Nearest Green, was alive, his whiskey was known to be the best,” said Victoria Eady Butler, master blender for Uncle Nearest. “We know this because in all the Nashville papers, the distributors would discount every whiskey from Tennessee and Kentucky on Fridays to drum up business. The only whiskey that was never discounted, and I mean never from what we have found, was the whiskey my great-great-grandfather was making.” •

{The Lynchburg Times is an independently owned and operated newspaper that publishes new stories every morning. Covering Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

An Heirloom Christmas: Millsaps family treasures hand-quilted stockings

By Tabitha Evans Moore, Editor & Publisher

Elizabeth Millsap’s heirloom stocking hangs in her Nashville home. It’s one of 65 handmade by Ann Millsaps and her daughter, Gina, from the quilts of Mary High Prince. {Photo Provided}

They’re made from quilts loving pieced together by her great-great-grandmother, Mary High Prince, and now, they hang on the stairway at the front entrance of her Nashville home. To Lynchburg native, Elizabeth Millsaps, and her daughter Ella Clare Merkel, they contain history and love and family … all sewn into a single heirloom … a handmade Christmas stocking.

They are a reminder of the way life used to be for most folks in Moore County and a nudge to always be grateful. The life Elizabeth and her daughter enjoy now is very different from the childhood her father, Joe, lived then.

“My dad was in elementary school before they got electricity in their homes,” Elizabeth says. “It’s astonishing to me when he talks about his childhood that electricity, which we so readily take for granted, is that new as part of our world.”

Elizabeth left Lynchburg in 1992 to attend Middle Tennessee State University in Murfreesboro. She and her daughter, Ella Clare, now live in Nashville, where Elizabeth works as a lobbyist at Millsaps Gowan Government Relation, her own firm.

Her father, Joe, lived in a three room house in the Charity community with his parents and siblings. As was the norm in those days, all three siblings (Joe, Baxter, and Barbara) all slept in the same room. During the winter, Joe’s dad heated the home with a wood stove that sometimes burned out in the middle of the night. To keep warm, everyone slept under stacks of handmade quilts they kept in the closet.

Mary High Prince {Photo Provided}

Elizabeth says her father’s great grandmother worked as a well-known seamstress in Moore County with a reputation for fine handwork, but especially embroidery. In 1930, she died at the age of 90, when Joe was just six weeks old. The quilts Mary High Prince handmade stayed in the family – getting handed down from one generation to another as heirlooms.

Then in 2000, Joe’s wife, Ann, and their daughter, Gina, decided to pass some of the quilts down in a different way. As they sorted through them, several were too tattered and worn to repair. And so, they devised a plan to gently cut them into enough squares to make 65 stockings for relatives.

“They spent a day planning how to cut them, and then two more days cutting, pressing and sewing them together,” says Elizabeth. “Each of my dad’s siblings gift for Christmas that year that was enough stockings for their children and grandchildren.”

Millsaps says that her mother and sister added a lace cuff to all the girl’s stockings made from the lace trim of old, vintage sheets they found stored with the quilts.

“My mother found a trash bag of old sheets in the attic and took all of the handmade lace trim from the pillow cases and soaked them for days to get them white again. She then cut off that trim to make a pretty cuff for each stocking,” she says.

Today those stocking sit spread across the country in the homes of the descendants of Mary High Prince filled with Christmas goodies and reminding all of us of the true meaning of Christmas … family. •

Book Review: Voices of Camp Forrest in World War II

Voices of Camp Forrest in World War II is available locally at Couch’s in Tullahoma.

By Tabitha Evans Moore, Editor & Publisher

It once included 1,300 buildings, 55 miles of roads, five miles of railroad tracks, and existed as a self-sustaining city of over 70,000 soldiers and another 12,000 civilians. Today, only a few overgrown concrete foundations remain. Originally built in 1926 near Tullahoma as a National Guard Camp, Camp Forrest served as a crucial induction and training site during World War II.

This is the subject of Dr. Elizabeth Taylor’s newest book, Voices of Camp Forrest in World War II (The History Press, $23.99). She interviewed many who lived, worked, trained and grew up there in addition to newspaper articles from the time, and personal diaries to tell the story. The Lynchburg Times recently caught up with the author to discuss her book with deep southern, middle Tennessee roots.

“I am not from Tenneesee but my interest in Camp Forrest evolved after researching the POWs who were housed there in WWII,” Dr. Taylor said.

It’s a little known fact that Camp Forrest served as a prisoner of war facility during WWII, which held prisoners of German, Japanese, and Italian descent. Prisoners worked on local farms, hospitals, and within the community. It was the first civilian internment camp in the nation at the time.

Voices of Camp Forrest in World War II covers topics such as the impact of Pearl Harbor on civilians and military personnel in the Middle Tennessee area, the construction of Camp Forrest, living and working at and around a city sized military installation as well as the effects of housing German prisoners of war throughout the area and the decommissioning of the base after the war.

Barracks at the Camp Forrest {Historic Photo}

In its heyday, Camp Forrest covered nearly 85,000 acres on land that now serves as the footprint of Arnold Engineering Development Complex (AEDC). It housed service clubs, guest houses, a library, post exchanges, a post office, hospital, chapel, a movie theater, and barracks. Major General George Patton once brought his famed 2nd Armored Division from Fort Benning, to practice maneuvers at Camp Forrest. It’s estimated that its mere existence increased the size of Tullahoma by as much as 40 percent.

One of the interesting aspects of the book is the way it explores the many ways Camp Forrest is still with us today.

“Camp Forrest is still very much with us today,” says Dr. Taylor. “When the base was decommissioned, everything was auctioned off … from buildings and autos to cooking supplies and lighting fixtures. Many individuals have told me stories how their family members obtained lumber from the Camp Forrest buildings and used it to build homes and barns. Many of the chapels on base were purchased by local congregations and are still in use today. Much of the 55 miles of roads of Camp Forrest still exist on the old base grounds, but many of the foundations and chimneys are slowly weathering away.”

Dr. Taylor says Tullahoma served as the perfect topographical spot for constructing a military base at that time because the terrain so closely mirrored the European front. It was also helpful that it already hosted a military installation, Camp Peay, the predecessor to Camp Forrest.

But as much positive impact as Camp Forrest brought there were downsides too. Much of the land on which it was built was confiscated by the federal government, leaving many rural farmers displaced. Families who’d farmed the same piece of land for generations suddenly found themselves homeless with little or no compensation.

Then there were the war games.

“The war games simulated the all of the conditions (sights, sounds, and smells) soldiers would face overseas,” said Dr. Taylor. “Tanks did not simply roll down the highways, but rather went through fields and pastures as necessary. It did not matter if a fence was in the way; it become a casualty of the war. In addition to property damage, often times farm animals were affected. For example, hens stopped laying eggs due to the simulated war occurring around them.”

The book mentions many familiar names. It features photos of historic downtown Tullahoma as it existed then and mentions specifically businesses like Clayton’s Shoes and Couch’s Photography, which still exist today. Dr. Taylor also interviewed former Lynchburg resident, Johnny Majors for the book.

“While he did not remember the broadcast about Pearl Harbor, as he was only six years old, Johnny Majors learned about the D-Day invasion listening to the radio with his grandmother, Bessie Bobo,” the book states.

It also talks about Shirley Majors, who worked as a barber in Lynchburg and Tullahoma at the time, playing sports and officiated sporting event at Camp Forrest in his spare time.

After D-Day in June 1944, training drastically reduced at Camp Forrest. After the war was over, the U.S. government declared Camp Forrest surplus property and close it. After the close, instead of returning ownership of land back to local farmers, the site was selected for a new Air Force Base. In 1951, President Truman renamed the area Arnold Engineering Development Center after Air Force General Henry H. “Hap” Arnold.

Voices of Camp Forrest in World War II is available locally at Couch’s in historic downtown Tullahoma as well as online retailers. For more information about Camp Forrest, check out the Camp Forrest website that Dr. Taylor maintains. •

{The Lynchburg Times is an independently owned and operated newspaper that publishes new stories every morning. Covering Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

Loretto bank and Lewisburg church among eight added to historic places register

The Bank of Loretto in Lawrence County is one of eight Tennessee places recently added to the National Register of Historic Places. {Historic Image Provided}

STATE NEWS — Eight locations including a bank in Loretto and a church in Lewisburg have been added to the National Register of Historic Places, according to a press release from the Tennessee Historical Commission. The Register is the official list of our country’s historic buildings, districts, sites, structures, and object worthy of preservation. It’s been overseen by the National Park Service since its inception in 1966.

Other examples of previously listed sites in the state include the Bobo Hotel in Lynchburg, the Bedford County Jail in Shelbyville, and the historic Depot in Cowan. This year’s inductees included:

1 | Bank of Loretto in Lawrence County – Built in the 1920’s, the Bank of Loretto served as a central part of the thriving lumber town’s city scape. Nana’s Pizzeria bought the structure and renovated it in 2013. It now houses the restaurant.

2 | Presbyterian Church U.S.A. in Lewisburg – Built in 1910, the late Gothic Revival style church is better known today as the Water Street Abbey. It’s the first known church of Lewisburg and is currently being renovated and rehabilitated into an events venue. It features a domed ceiling, original pews, stained glass windows, and five rolling oak doors.

3 | Hardwick Farms in Cleveland – Built around 1932, a Spanish Revival style home is the centerpiece of a historic 758-acre farm. It still stands as an example of modern farming in the 1930’s. The original owner C.L. Hardwick grew tobacco and was world-renown for his Aberdeen-Angus livestock. It’s hosted celebrities such as Duke Ellington, Benny Goodman, and Glenn Miller.

The Charles L. Lawhon Cottage in Knoxville {Historic Image}

4 | Charles L. Lawhon Cottage in Knoxville – This traditional English cottage was built in the Revival and Tudor Revival styles in the early 1900’s. The designer, Charles L. Lawhon, died in 1926 but his family retained ownership until the 1940’s. It’s currently being renovated.

5 | Frierson Chapel in Coopertown – Locals established this African-American church in 1870. A tornado destroyed it in 1943 and then it was rebuilt by then pastor, Reverend W.D. Frierson. It now belongs to the City of Coopertown who plans to rehabilitate and renovate it.

6 | Barksdale Mounted Police Station in Memphis – This historic police station once housed both officers and horses. Located in Midtown, the 108-year-old two-story brick building features ornate flourishes like pediments and arches typical of public facilities erected in the early 20th century. Jail cell bars can still be seen from some windows. It has new owners who plan to rehabilitate the building using a historic preservation tax credit.

The men’s sleeping quarters in Hoyt Wooten’s bomb shelter, shown April 1, 1963 in Memphis. (Photo Proved by Historic Memphis)

7 | Wooten Fallout Shelter in Memphis – Designed and built by engineer, designer, and radio/TV station owner Hoyt Wooten in the 1960’s, this Cold War era shelter sat in the backyard of his 27-acre home. He designed it to hold up to 65 people for a month in case of a nuclear bomb. It featured a kitchen, male and female dormitories, recreation room, bathrooms, radio communication room, and a morgue. The shelter is now used as a community center in a gated community.

8 | Jonesborough Historic District – Previously listed on the register in 1969, Jonesborough received a grant to update and revise the original nomination.

{The Lynchburg Times is an independently owned and operated newspaper that publishes new stories every morning. Covering Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

Promise Manor added to Best Christmas Lights list

Promise Manor Christmas lights
WPLN in Nashville recently featured Lynchburg’s Promise Manor on their list of best Middle Tennessee Christmas lights. {Photo Provided}

LOCAL NEWS | Events — As anyone who’s driven down Motlow Barns Road at night can tell you, it’s beginning to look a lot like Christmas at Promise Manor. Located inside one of the oldest and most historic homes in Lynchburg, the newly renovated landmark sparkles in shades of the holidays.

Christmas trees peek out from each of the two story Greek Revival-style home’s front windows. New owner Kayla White, also tastefully placed white lights, garland, and real evergreen wreaths around the front door and the portico. Across the entire scene falls giant light blue snowflakes that just scream, “give us a white Christmas.”

It’s a gorgeous small town, southern site and one that got the attention of WPLN Nashville the public radio station that recently added Promise Manor to it’s, Here’s Where to Find the Best and Brightest Christmas Displays in Middle Tennessee list.

It’s the only spot in Lynchburg to earn the honor. Other area locations were the Ray Family at 711 East Grizzard and Reese Family at 2010 Adams Street in Tullahoma, Brockman’s Dancing Lights at 1825 Dabbs Ford in Decherd, the Daugherty Family at 169 Brandi Way in Winchester, and the Winton’s Family at 55 Haskell Winton Road in Manchester. For the complete list, click here.

Will host a open house on December 15

If you’d like a peek at the inside of Promise Manor, they will host an open house on December 15 from 1-4 p.m. There will be plenty of photo ops, free pictures with Santa, a photo booth, cookie decorating, and more. For complete details, check out the event’s Facebook page by clicking here. The event is free, but organizers ask that you bring a donation for Moore County Friends of Animals to attend. The local animal rescue group could use food, beds, blankets, toys, leashes, and sweaters.•

{The Lynchburg Times is an independently owned and operated newspaper that publishes new stories every morning. Covering Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}