UT Extension: Farmers affected by pandemic should apply for CFAP2

Commodities such as beef cattle and dairy are eligible under this second round of pandemic assistance for farmers. Breeding stock is not eligible, according to the USDA. (File Photo)

STATE AG NEWS — Are a Moore County farmer or producer who has been directly impacted by the pandemic? If so, local UT Extension County Director Larry Moorehead encourages you to apply for the Coronavirus Food Assistance Program 2. Implemented by the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), the program seeks to support agricultural producers who continue to face market disruptions and additional costs associated with COVID-19.

CFAP 2 follows the first round of CFAP, which had an application period of May 26 through September 11. USDA’s Farm Service Agency will accept CFAP 2 applications from September 21 through December 11, 2020.

CFAP 2 payments will be made for three categories of commodities: price trigger commodities, flat-rate crops, and sales commodities.

Price trigger commodities are major commodities that meet a minimum five-percent price decline over a specified period of time. Price trigger commodities eligible for CFAP 2 include broilers, eggs, dairy, and livestock such as beef cattle, hogs, pigs, lambs, and sheep. Breeding stock are not eligible for CFPA2.

“This will pay on your cattle inventory between April 16 and August 31,” County Director Moorehead explained. “This deal does not include your cows, just your marketable calves or heifers that have not calved.”

Moorehead explains that once a heifer produces a calf, she’s considered a cow and is no longer eligible under the federal guidelines.

Crops such as barley, corn, sorghum, soybeans, sunflowers, upland cotton, and all classes of wheat are eligible as price trigger commodities.

Flat-rate crops are also eligible. These either do not meet the five-percent price decline trigger or do not have data available to calculate a price change and include alfalfa, amaranth grain, buckwheat, canola, Extra Long Staple (ELS) cotton, crambe (colewort), einkorn, emmer, flax, guar, hemp, indigo, industrial rice, kenaf, khorasan, millet, mustard, oats, peanuts, quinoa, rapeseed, rice, sweet rice, wild rice, rye, safflower, sesame, speltz, sugar beets, sugarcane, teff, and triticale.

Sales commodities eligible for CFAP 2 include specialty crops, aquaculture, nursery crops and floriculture, and other commodities not included in the price trigger and flat-rate payment categories. These include ornamental fish, goat’s milk, Christmas trees, cut flowers, honey, tobacco, wool and other items. For a complete list, click here.

Commodities such as hay, grazing crops, equine, breeding stock, pets, and animals raised for game purposes are not eligible.

USDA will accept application through December 11, 2020 and you may view the application by clicking here.

Forms are also located at the local UT Extension office located inside the Moore County Building at 241 Main Street, Suite 214. You may also contact Director Moorehead at 931-759-7163 or 931-580-6073 for more information or with questions. •

{The Lynchburg Times is the only independently owned and operated newspaper in Lynchburg, Tennessee. We cover Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

Burn permits required beginning October 15

Burning permits are now required in Moore County for any outdoor fires. (Graphic Provided)

STATE NEWS | Careless debris burning is a major cause of wildfires. Local fire officials remind locals to avoid burning in dry weather conditions and when it’s windy. You should always keep water nearby and stay with an outdoor fire until it’s completely out.

Beginning today, the Metro Volunteer Fire Department and the Tennessee Department of Agriculture would also like to remind Moore County citizens that Debris Burn Permits will be required beginning October 15 and continuing through May 15, 2021.

The permits are free and can be obtained online at the Debris Burn Permit Application site. They are applicable for single day, individual burn piles for both leaves and brush. Citizens can not burn tires or other rubber products, paints and chemicals, household trash, plastics, aerosol and food cans, electrical wiring, oils, asphalt shingles, paper products, buildings, clothing, or furniture.

Large scale burning for construction site prep, agricultural clearing, wildlife area prep will require a an approved request from a a Division of Forestry representative. Call the Moore County number at 877-350-BURN (2876).

Online permits will be available from 8 a.m. to 11 p.m. For more information about Tennessee Wildfire Laws, click here. •

{The Lynchburg Times is the only independently owned and operated newspaper in Lynchburg, Tennessee. We cover Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

Electoral vote allotments could change if Tennessee’s 2020 Census response is down

Both Tennessee’s electoral votes and congressional delegation numbers are determine by U.S. Census numbers. There’s still time to get your 2020 Census responses in via the web. (File Photo)

The state of Tennessee enjoys 11 electoral votes but that could change if the state’s population isn’t properly counted in the 2020 Census. A state’s electoral vote allotment is determined by the number of representatives and senators in Congress. And Tennessee’s Congressional delegation is based on the state’s population as determined every 10 years by the United States Census. That’s why it’s vitally important to get every Tennessean counted before the Census ends on October 15.

The current administration decided to end the Census early in order to try and get results back before the end of the year. This year’s Census, already upended by the COVID-19 pandemic, will end on October 15. Originally, the officials planned to end the count on October 31.

Under Federal law, your Census responses are considered confidential and cannot be shared with anyone, including any government agency. There is still time to fill out your Census form online and be counted. You can still self-respond to the census online at 2020census.gov, or by phone at 844-330-2020. •

{The Lynchburg Times is the only independently owned and operated newspaper in Lynchburg, Tennessee. We cover Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

After bye week, Raiders remain #5 in state

Little changed in the top ten Class A teams in the state this past week. The Raiders remain tied with Greenfield for the number five spot, according to the AP. (Lynchburg Times Graphic)

SPORTS | After a week off, the Moore County Raiders remain the number five Class 1A football in the state, according to the Associated Press (AP).

Moore County remains tied with Greenfield for the number five spot, according to the latest poll released on Monday. South Pittsburg remains the undisputed number 1. They haven’t moved from that top spot all season. Copper Basin (2), Fayetteville City (3), and Coalfield (4) round out the top spots. Moore County lost in Fayetteville on September 18 by a 28-22 margin.

Lake County (7), Huntingdon (8), Cornersville (9), and Monterey (10) make up the remaining top ten Class 1A teams. The Raiders beat the Bulldog in Cornersville in September 4 by a final of 33-23.

The Raiders(5-1) will take on Jo Byrns (3-4) on Friday at Raider Stadium. To read our preview of that game, click here.

If you can’t attend the game, it will be broadcast live on Raider Country 105.1 and 95.5 FM with Joe Abraham and the Moore County Sports Network, on the NFHS Network, or The Lynchburg Times will post live score updates on our Facebook page. •

{The Lynchburg Times is the only independently owned and operated newspaper in Lynchburg, Tennessee. We cover Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

Students can now earn their high school equivalency virtually in all 95 TN counties

The state of Tennessee recently announced that adult learners in all 95 counties can now acquire their high school equivalency online. (File Photo)

EDUCATION | Learn online. Graduate online. That’s the motto of the new Tennessee Department of Labor and Workforce Development statewide campaign to make adult education available to everyone … especially during the pandemic.

The state of Tennessee recently announced that adult learners in all 95 counties can now acquire their high school equivalency online and Moore County Public Library can help.

“There are still several adult education programs whose classrooms are closed due to COVID-19,” said Jay Baker, interim Assistant Commissioner of Adult Education. “We want everyone interested in improving their math, literacy, and English language skills to know they never have to leave home and they can still work to change their future. And that includes earning a high school equivalency diploma—all of it can be done completely online.”

The Moore County Public Library works as an adult education provider in our area in association with the Lincoln County Literacy Council.

“At this time, it is up to the teacher and student whether they meet face-to-face,” says Moore Library Director Peggy Gold. “But online is an option and if we have a Moore County resident interested, the teacher may be willing to meet them here at the library.”

The online exam is identical to the High School Equivalency Test (HiSET)taken in physical testing centers in terms of content, format, on-screen experience, and scoring

“Earning a high school equivalency diploma can really change a person’s life,” Baker added. “An adult who has a diploma can earn much higher wages and unlock more opportunities for education and career advancement.”

The Tennessee Department of Labor and Workforce Development’s HiSET Voucher Program covers all costs associated with the exams. To receive a voucher from a local Adult Education program, a test taker must be a Tennessee resident and demonstrate test preparedness through a qualifying practice test.

To learn more, call the TDLWD at 800-531-1515 and they will connect you with someone at the local adult education provider. You can also contact the Moore County Public Library at 931-759-7285. •

{The Lynchburg Times is the only independently owned and operated newspaper in Lynchburg, Tennessee. We cover Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

Southern Festival of Books kicks off virtually on Thursday

Readers and writers from across Tennessee, and the world, will celebrate the joy of reading and lifelong learning through free online sessions with more than 100 authors beginning n Thursday. {Art Provided}

Books and other forms of the written word are helping us get through this global pandemic. It’s for that reason among others that the organizers of the state’s largest literary event will transition the annual Southern Festival of Books to a free, virtual event.

Organizers announced in July that this year’s Southern Festival of Books would take place virtually, and for free on October 1-11 in order to maintain the health and safety of not only the authors but also the hundreds that attend the annual Music City event.

“We will miss being at the beautiful Nashville Public Library and on War Memorial Plaza, with all of the buzz and energy that the Festival weekend brings. But the important traditions will carry on in new and exciting ways; the opportunity to hear writers read from and discuss their works, and the chance to engage in ideas and discourse that are vital today. Writers will join us from around the country, and we will also share some sites and literary history from Tennessee,” said Humanities Tennessee Literature and Language Program Director Serenity Gerbman.

“We are energized by the chance to reach audiences of all types who aren’t able to visit Nashville in person but who will be able to join the Festival from anywhere in the world. The celebration of the written word will continue, and we hope you will join us Oct. 1-11.”

Confirmed authors include actor, comedian, and writer Michael Ian Black, poet Nikky Finney, Devil in the White City author Erik Larson, author and Parnassus owner Ann Patchett, and former U.S. Poet Laureate Natasha Trethway. For the full roster of 100 authors click here.

“Now more than ever we need to find ways to connect with each other and foster community.  Ingram Content Group proudly supports Humanities Tennessee and its decision to virtually host the Southern Festival of Books this fall.  The free programming offered during the festival and throughout the year is vital to the region as it prompts us to reflect upon stories and ideas of all kinds,” said Ingram President and CEO Shawn Morin.

By necessity, the Festival’s annual Authors In The Round fundraising dinner will also transition to a virtual format with details forthcoming.

“We look forward to all we will learn presenting this year’s Festival online, so that when we return in 2021 with the Festival and “Authors In The Round” dinner in person, both events will be energized to celebrate community, literature, and learning as never before,” said Humanities Tennessee Executive Director Tim Henderson.

For more information, visit the Humanities Tennessee website by clicking here.

{The Lynchburg Times is the only independently owned and operated newspaper in Moore County … covering Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, the Lynchburg Music Fest, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

WHISKEY MAKING 101: Motlow joins MTSU, Columbia State in $300K USDA fermentation science grant

Motlow State Chemistry Instructor Nathan Fisher will lead the fermentation science partnership with MTSU and Columbia State. A $300,000 USDA grant will fund the project. {Photo Provided}

EDUCATION | Motlow State is located in Lynchburg – the unofficial whiskey capitol of the world – and right in the heart of the Tennessee Whiskey Trail. So, it only makes sense that they’d be the perfect educational partner for a fermentation science programs.

The USDA just awarded a $300,000 grant to Motlow, MTSU, and Columbia State with an eye toward attracting future agricultural students to the Fermentation Science Program, according to a recent press release.

It’s a three-year, $300,000 grant proposed by MTSU’s Tony Johnston, who is partnering with Motlow Chemistry Instructor Nathan Fisher and Columbia State’s Karen Kendall-Fite, with faculty from all three schools participating.

“Our collaboration in this grant award is part of a larger, long-term vision. We are very intentional about our plan to introduce a variety of Fermentation and Distillery Science learning opportunities,” said Motlow President Dr. Michael Torrence. “Our vision includes broadening short-term certificate training opportunities, as well as the development of new degree programs. Those programs will specifically seek to cultivate the success of minority and underserved populations in these fields.”

The grant increases awareness of agriculture and introduces fermentation concepts into lower-division undergraduate math and science classes at Columbia State and Motlow, and drives fermentation science as a career option.

“Students, in general, aren’t aware of what fermentation science is, much less that it’s agricultural,” said Johnston, professor, and director of the MTSU Fermentation Science program. “The grant seeks to get more students interested in agriculture as a career.

 “Agriculture is an applied STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math) field, but it is not traditionally viewed this way,” Johnston said. “The grant provides an opportunity to connect the dots between STEM courses and agriculture and raise awareness of and increase the potential for a student to become interested in the applied STEM career that is fermentation science.”

Johnston said part of the grant would go toward classroom equipment — smartphones and scientific equipment — for Motlow and Columbia State students to learn about chemistry, biology, and math through applications of Fermentation in their freshmen- and sophomore-level courses. The funds will also pay for faculty training.

For more information about this exciting new opportunity, contact Nathan Fisher, Motlow Chemistry Professor, at 615-220-7879 or nfisher@mscc.edu. •

{The Lynchburg Times is the only independently owned and operated newspaper in Lynchburg, Tennessee. We cover Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

Moore County COVID-19 Update: 6 Things to Know This Week

This map represents cases by county as of Friday at 2 p.m. {Graphic Provided}

With the announcement of Friday’s numbers at 2 p.m., Tennessee reported 189,454 total confirmed COVID-19 cases. Our state experienced 136 new deaths this week but the deceased rate remains at around one percent. According to the state, 172,618 total COVID-19 patients have recovered or have inactive cases. Here’s the top six things you need to know for this week:

1| Moore experiences it’s largest one week increase. According to today’s numbers, Moore County gained 24 new COVID cases in the past seven days – from 145 on September 19 to 169 today. This is the largest weekly increase since the state began tracking numbers in March. There were more recoveries (17) than new active cases (11) in the past seven days. Moore County has experienced one COVID-related death.

2| Coffee County replaces Bedford as regional hotspot. Regionally, Coffee County experienced that greatest seven day increase with 141 followed by Franklin County (88), and Lincoln County (35). Previous regional hotspot Bedford County experienced the smallest increase this week with 33.

3 | More new state cases than recoveries reported this week. In state numbers, there were more new COVID cases (8015) in the past seven days than recovered/inactive cases (7636). Tennessee had 136 new COVID deaths this past week for a total of 2,352. Nearly three percent of Tennessee residents have reported confirmed cases.

4 | Regional testing moves from Manchester to Tullahoma. This week regional testing moved from the Old Southern Family Market in Manchester to Waggoner Park in Tullahoma. Free COVID-19 testing will take place at 1208 East Carroll Street in the pavilion closest to Industrial Boulevard. Locals may remain in their cars for testing.

5 | Nashville names hotspots. If you are headed to Nashville this weekend, it’s best to avoid COVID hotspot identified by the Metro Health Department this week including 49 sites and six downtown bars. These location have been linked to more than 2,600 cases of coronavirus and include Loser’s, Tootsie’s, Dogwood, Kid Rock’s Honky Tonk, Dawghouse Saloon, and Winners.

6 | Flu vaccinations are especially important this year. Health officials say in the midst of the COVID 19 health situation it’s now more important that ever to get a flu shot. According to the CDC, the flu viruses and the virus that causes COVID-19 will both be spreading this year and recommends that all people six months and older get a yearly flu vaccine. It’s best to get your flu vaccine before the end of October. •

{The Lynchburg Times is the only independently owned and operated newspaper in Lynchburg, Tennessee. We cover Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

Rural Roadside Rescue: TDOT presents herbicide plan to Metro Council

Johnsongrass is an invasive species that often blocks visibility where Moore County roads intersect with state highways. {Photo Credit: USDA}

LOCAL NEWS | Drive Highway 55 between Jack Daniel’s Distillery and Moore County High School and you’ll notice a constant down both sides of the road … shoulder high Johnsongrass. Growing unchecked, it can block Moore County driver’s vision as they turn onto local and state roads.

If you drive into Lincoln County, the grass isn’t a menace. What’s the difference? Several years ago, the Metro Council voted to opt out of the state’s roadside herbicide spraying program and mowing is more costly and can’t keep up.

According to TDOT, the state highway department and Metro Highway Department receive numerous complaints from locals each year concerning obstructed views when attempting to turn onto Highway 55, Highway 82 from numerous county roads including Good Branch Road, Cobb Hollow Road, Firetower Road, and the Five Points area near Motlow College.

Keeping the grass in control is an important but costly job. In the most recent year, TDOT spent $26,963 mowing 178.77 acres in Moore County. For comparison, the state agency spent $59,352 mowing 855.98 acres in Lincoln County. That’s a difference of $69 per acre in Lincoln County versus $151 per acre in Moore County, according to TDOT.

The State Highway Department will present a plan to spray Johnsongrass on local roadsides during Monday night’s Metro Council meeting. Two individuals from TDOT, Jarrod Bonar and Lance Roland, will appear to explain the states herbicide program and to ease any concerns about the “all kill” chemicals that have been used in the past.

Specifically, they will address UT Extension’s Larry Moorehead’s previous concerns about Round Up, which caused erosion and drifted into other areas, according to Mayor Bonnie Lewis. TDOT now sprays Out Rider, an herbicide that kills Johnson Grass only as well as a drift control chemical called Sharp Shooter.

Moorehead recently rode Moore County roads with TDOT and local farmer Jody Preston — who works as a Operations Tech for TDOT — to visualize the difference in the mow versus spray methods.

According to Mayor Bonnie Lewis, Moorehead did his own research after the ride along and agrees with the use of Out Rider on local roadsides.

The Metro Council meeting takes place on Monday night at 6:30 p.m. at the Lynchburg Legion Building located just of the Booneville Highway. For a complete agenda, contact Mayor Lewis’s office at 931-759-7076 or read our meeting preview click here. •

{The Lynchburg Times is the only independently owned and operated newspaper in Lynchburg, Tennessee. We cover Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

Unemployment work search requirement resumes

job searching
Tennessee will resume its work search requirement for those receiving unemployment benefits beginning the last week of September. {File Photo}

STATE NEWS | According to the latest numbers available from the Tennessee Department of workforce and development, the unemployment rate in Moore County is 6.4 % – as compared to 9.5% for the state. That’s down from the 7.5% rate from June but up from the 3.9% unemployment rate for the same time period last year.

Unemployed citizens collecting unemployment benefits will need to once again complete weekly work searches beginning Sunday, October 4, according to a state press release.

Claimants who choose to continue receiving unemployment benefits will start work search activities during the week of Sunday, Sept. 27. They will then document those searches during their weekly certification for Sunday, Oct. 4, and each week after that date.

Furloughed or temporarily laid off claimants who currently have a definitive return to work date do not need to complete this requirement. Self employed individuals currently receiving benefits will be required to call on clients, submit bids or proposals, apply for contract or gig work, and / or attend training. Claimants who are out of work due to one of the COVID-19 reasons listed in the CARES Act may be exempt from performing job searches if they self-certify that they are unable to look for work due to one of the designations and are otherwise able and available, according to the state.

For one-on-one assistance, career specialists at Tennessee’s more than 80 American Job Centers can work with job seekers at no cost to provide customized job searches, job fairs, re-employment services, and eligibility assessment (RESEA) appointments, and help them determine if job training assistance is available. Centers are located regionally in Decherd, Fayetteville, Winchester, and Tullahoma. Click here for contact information.

Traditional job search methods also satisfy the requirement to remain eligible to receive benefits. If a claimant fails to complete their work searches, they will be denied benefits for the week they did not meet eligibility requirements. •

{The Lynchburg Times is an independently owned and operated newspaper that publishes new stories every morning. Covering Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}