Celebration will move forward despite COVID-19 concerns

The Celebration Board of Directors announced on Wednesday that this year’s event will take place with a few COVID-19 accommodations to keep fans safe. {Photo Credit Shane Shiflet via The Celebration}

SHELBYVILLE — Organizers say they plan to move ahead with the 82nd annual Tennessee Walking Horse National Celebration. Their board of director announced on Wednesday that they were in the process of finalizing plans for this year’s show slated to begin August 26.

Despite their intention to move forward, they will be making some changes to accommodate local, state, and federal COVID-19 guidelines. For example, if they prefer, box seat holders will be allowed to work with Celebration staff to move their seats to a less crowded area of the arena.

“The move will be a one-year temporary move and the customer will not lose the right to the original box they’ve previously had,” they stated. “Also, if the customer moves to a different location they will be refunded the difference in price if the new box is less expensive and charged the difference if the new box is more expensive than their original box.”

The Blue Ribbon Circle Club will continue this year but in a new, outside location in the front lawn of the current Blue Ribbon. Table tops inside the Blue Ribbon Circle Club will be spread out. Food selection may be limited and will no longer be self serve.

Due to COVID-19 guidelines, there will not be a corporate sponsors party this year. There will also not be any Celebration sponsored after-show parties or entertainment including live music.

“The board just didn’t feel comfortable with the current executive orders in place of having that many people in one confined location,” they said.

Individual barns can still have gatherings, food and normal customer entertainment but they won’t be allowed to bring in outside entertainment.

Also this year, organizers will require all entries to stable 48 hours prior to their performance. For more information about this year’s changes, visit The Celebration website bu clicking here. •

{The Lynchburg Times is the only independently owned and operated newspaper in Moore County … covering Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, the Lynchburg Music Fest, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

New jobs coming to Bedford County as Newell Brands expands

BEDFORD COUNTY — Over 100 new jobs and an $11 community investment is headed to Bedford County. Newell Brands – whose produces consumer brands like Paper Mate, Graco, Coleman, Yankee Candle, and Ball – announced recently that they will be expanding their Shelbyville operations to keep up with growing demand. The company will expand into an existing 211,000-square-foot facility in Bedford County.

“It is with very great pleasure that we, the City of Shelbyville, commend Newell Brands on its current expansion. We thank Newell Brands for the confidence the company has placed in our community, for the workforce we have and the workforce we continue to grow. This investment in our community does not go unnoticed by our citizens and our surrounding communities,” said Shelbyville Mayor Wallace Cartwright.

Newell Brands is a southern company headquartered out of Atlanta. To learn more about the company, click here. There is a Careers page, which offers more information about jobs as they come available in the area. •

{The Lynchburg Times is an independently owned and operated newspaper that publishes new stories every morning. Covering Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

Next Shelbyville haunted walking tour happens October 12

EVENTS| Shelbyville — Historic Shelbyville exists as a town rich in history. The pre-Civil War community boasts one of the first public squares built in southern, middle Tennessee. The original square and courthouse were laid out around 1810.

Since then, the courthouse has been destroyed and replaced four times. Five different Bedford County courthouse buildings have stood in the middle of the historic district. Founders built the first courthouse in 1810. A new structure replaced it in 1813, but was destroyed by a tornado in 1830. Builders completed a third courthouse in 1833, which stood until 1863 when it was “accidentally” burned down by Confederate forces occupying Shelbyville. Locals replaced it in 1873 but in 1934 a lynch mob burned it down the after learning that a young black man they wanted to hang had been transported to another county for his protection, according to the Bedford County Historical Society. Nashville architectural firm Marr and Holman designed the Classical Revival building the now sits in the center of the town square in 1935.

With that much rich and storied history, is there any surprise that ghost stories and unusual activities abound in the area? On October 12 from 8:13 to 9:13 p.m. Historic Uptown Shelbyville will host Tour #13 Haunted History, a walking tour of the area that will begin at 111 South Main Street and end at a local cemtery.

Tickets are $13 per person or $35 per family (parents and children). The event will also take place on October 26. Visit the event’s Facebook page for more details. •

{The Lynchburg Times is an independently owned and operated newspaper that publishes new stories every morning. Covering Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}