State parks plan virtual 5K; proceeds benefit the Honey Project

You can run the Honey Bee Virtual 5K any day between May 17-23. {Art Provided}

Get out of the house. Get moving and get out there and save the bees.

May 20 is World Bee Day and to celebrate Tennessee State Parks will host a virtual 5K with all proceeds benefiting the Tennessee State Park Honey Project. Both Henry Horton State Park and South Cumberland State Park participate regionally.

The race takes place May 17 through 23. Locals can run (or walk) the virtual race from anywhere and at their own pace. The registration fee is $20. All participants will receive a bib by email. A finisher’s medal and certificate will be sent by mail.

The Honey Project helps establish honeybee hives in parks across Tennessee to help folks learn about pollinators. Since pollinator health is critical to Tennessee’s agricultural, environmental and ecological health, these tiny insects open the door to discuss a myriad of environmental issues. TSP also bottles and sells state park honey in area gift shops.

To register for the race, click here. To learn more about the TSP Honey Project, click here. •

{The Lynchburg Times is an independently owned and operated newspaper that publishes new stories every morning. Covering Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

Wildlife Officials: Leave fawns where they lay

State wildlife officials say the best thing you can do for any newborn fawn you discover is to leave it where it lays. The mother will usually return soon. {File Photo)

Bambi doesn’t need your help and you don’t want to be guilty of fawn-napping. That’s what state wildlife officials say.

It’s that time again … fawn season. Mama deer seems to have their babies in the oddest places … under your azaleas, in the hay field, or on your back lawn. As deer populations increase and natural habitats decrease, the likelihood that a deer mistakes your yard for the forest are good.

Many locals discover fawns and immediately think they’ve been abandoned by their mom and need help. Not true, say Tennessee Wildlife officials.

Fawns, unlike foals, don’t walk right away. They often need several days to get their legs under them. In the meantime, their spotted pelts look like dappled sunlight on the forest floor and offer great camouflage. Fawns don’t carry a natural scent, so predators won’t be drawn to them unless humans interfere.

Even if you can’t see her, Mama Deer isn’t far away. She’s likely feeding out of sight, so as not to unnecessary alert a predator to her newborn. She’ll come back, usually around dusk, but certainly not if her fawn has been moved or humans are hovering nearby.

It’s also not a good idea to take the fawn to keep as a pet because it’s illegal. In Tennessee, deer (as well as American black bears and wild turkeys) can only be kept by bona fide zoos and TWRA authorized wildlife rehabilitators.

There are some case when a Good Samaritan should intervene. For example, if the fawn is clearly injured or there’s a dead doe nearby. In that case, you should contact a licensed wildlife rehabilitators. For a list of rehabilitators in this area, click here. •

{The Lynchburg Times is an independently owned and operated newspaper that publishes new stories every morning. Covering Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

Music Fest headliner Kip Moore plays Jack Daniel virtual concert on Friday

Kip Moore will play a virtual concert sponsored by Jack Daniel on Friday. He’ll also headline on October 2 at this year’s Lynchburg Music Fest. {Artwork Provided}

Get ready for a preview of this year’s Lynchburg Music Fest on Friday when Nashville country artist Kip Moore performs a virtual concert sponsored by Jack Daniel’s Distillery. Moore will perform songs from his latest album, Wild World.

The creative folks at the distillery launched the multi-genre live stream concert series to raise money for Sweet Relief Musicians COVID-19 Fund. It provides financial assistance to all types of career musicians and music industry workers including immediate assistance with medical expenses, lodging, clothing, food and other vital living expenses to those impacted due to sickness or loss of work. You can make a donation by clicking here.

Moore landed early on the Bro Country scene singing songs about trucks, beers, and small town Friday nights. So, it’s fitting that he’ll headline the most famous small town in America on Friday, October 2 during the second annual Lynchburg Music Fest.

Born in Tifton, Georgia, Moore began his music career during his college days a Wallace State Community College before moving to Nashville in 2004 where he met songwriter and producer Brett James. James – who wrote Carrie Underwood’s famous Jesus Take the Wheel – took an interest in Moore and helped him sign a publishing deal.

Moore’s well know for his chart-topping single, Something Bout a Truck, which hit number one on the Billboard country charts. He followed that song with success like Hey Pretty Girl and Beer Money. Last August, he released an anticipated single, She’s Mine, the first song from a much anticipated upcoming album. 

To watch, tune in to Kip Moore’s Facebook or Instagram page beginning at 6 p.m. (CST). •

{The Lynchburg Times is the only independently owned and operated newspaper in Moore County … covering Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, the Lynchburg Music Fest, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

Motlow honors society named one of the world’s best

MOORE COUNTY — Excellence and scholarship among two-year college students like those at Motlow State Community College … that what the Phi Theta Kappa (PTK) international honor society is all about. And Motlow’s one of the top in the world, according to their recent convention.

The 2020 International PTK Virtual Catalyst Convention recently recognized the Motlow chapter of Phi Theta Kappa (PTK) international honor society and its leadership as one of the top 100 chapters in the world. The announcement happened at their yearly Catalyst Convention – a yearly event that happen each spring. It draws thousands of scholars from around the world to represent their chapters, their institutions, and their regions. This year the convention was held online due to the pandemic.

“The Catalyst convention was an excellent wrap up to an amazing year,” said Gregg Garrison, associate professor of biology and Motlow PTK advisor and Tennessee PTK regional coordinator. “This was the best award recognition year we have ever had. Although we were disappointed that we could not be at the actual event this year, we were fortunate to still experience the streamed event from the safety of our own homes. Afterward, I hosted a zoom meeting with the Motlow attendees and several other members and advisors from across the state so we could celebrate together. The experience was amazing.”

Fifteen representatives from Motlow PTK attended the virtual event with more than 3,700 representatives from 1,300 chapters in multiple nations.

Members of the Motlow PTK chapter of Phi Theta Kappa also attended the 2020 Tennessee Regional Convention at Dyersburg State Community College, Feb. 21-23, for a weekend of team building and fellowship with other chapters from colleges across the state.

Motlow PTK advisors and students recently attended the annual Regional PTK convention at Dyersburg State Community College. Pictured are (seated left to right) Barry McKinley, Matthew Bobo, Dasha Grayson, and Hannah Green (standing left to right) Gregg Garrison, Dayron Deaton-Owens, Robin Keel, Misty Griffith, Ashley Cain, Jamaya Blackwell, Heather Whittaker, Nick Locke, Keira Pfefferkorn, Madelyn Wood, Sonja Edge, Laura Brown, and Matilde Olea Guevara. {Photo Provided}

“The Regional Convention was also an amazing experience that allowed Motlow PTK members to travel and meet with members from eleven other colleges from across the state,” Garrison added. “Students were able to share ideas about making their chapter stronger, listen to engaging session speakers, be involved with the election process of regional officers, and celebrate with each other during the awards banquet.”

Two Motlow students were elected as Tennessee Regional Officers for the upcoming year, Madelyn Wood, vice president for Middle Tennessee, and Keira Pferrerkorn, secretary for Tennessee. Motlow PTK students received the following awards at the regional convention:Rebekah Randall, First Place, Publication in Creative Non-fiction; First Place, Distinguished Officer Award, and Keira PferrerKorn, First Place, Extemporaneous Speech Competition. •

{The Lynchburg Times is an independently owned and operated newspaper that publishes new stories every morning. Covering Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

Lynchburg Farmer’s Market kicks off May 22

The Lynchburg Farmers’ Market kicked on Friday, May 22. Due to heavy rain, there first market took place in Wiseman Park but future events will take place just off Major’s Boulevard as an open air market. {File Photo}

LYNCHBURG — Homegrown fruits and veggies, local honey, artisan foods, fresh flowers, crafts, fresh-made breads, handmade soaps … you can find it all at local farmers’ markets. Plus, there’s no better way to support our local farmers.

The very first Lynchburg Farmer’s Market kicked off last Friday. But due to heavy rainfall, organizers were forced to forego plans to kick off the season as an pop-up, open-air market in the open lot at the corner of Majors Boulevard and Mechanic Street directly across from the Moore County Public Library. Instead, the inaugural farmers’ market took place at Moorehead Pavilion in Wiseman Park.

The next public market will take place on Friday, June 5 in the new location and every Friday after that from 2-5 p.m. There will be onsite parking available for around 15 or so, and Mayor Lewis says she’s working on securing overflow parking. Market attendees are asked not to park along Majors Boulevard or Mechanic Street as it presents safety issues.

If you are interested in being a vendor at this year’s market, contact Mayor Lewis’s office at 931-759-7076. •

{The Lynchburg Times is an independently owned and operated newspaper that publishes new stories every morning. Covering Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

Brown named new MCHS varsity boy’s basketball coach

New MCHS Varsity Boy’s Basketball Coach Justin Brown

LYNCHBURG — Moore County Schools official announced today that Justin Brown will be the next Moore County High School varsity boy’s basketball coach.

Brown and his wife, Andrea, will relocated to Lynchburg from Memphis. A native of Sparta, Brown graduated from Tennessee Tech in 2010. He coached at Dyersburg High School from 2013-14 and then at Millington Central High School for two seasons as a assistant varsity boy’s coach. For the past four years, he coached varsity boy’s basketball at Southwind High School in Memphis.

During his career, he ‘s won 2017 TSSAA AAA State Runner-up, three District 15-AAA Championships, two District 15-AAA Tournament Championships, 2019 Shelby County Association Runner-up, and 2020 Shelby County Association Champions. During his time at Southwind High School, he helped his team achieve a record of 107-21 and an 80 percent winning percentage over four seasons.

Brown takes over for Heath Hardin who resigned the position in April, according to a letter supplied by Director of Schools Chad Moorehead. •

{The Lynchburg Times is an independently owned and operated newspaper that publishes new stories every morning. Covering Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

May 5 COVID-19 Update: 4 Things You Need to Know Today

{Graphic Courtesy of the TN Dept. of Health}

The Tennessee Department of Health released new COVID-19 case counts on Tuesday at 2 p.m. and Tennessee now reports 13,690 (119 more than the previous day). Our state has now experienced 226 deaths (seven more since yesterday). According to the state, 6,356 COVID-19 patients have recovered. That’s around 47 percent of reported cases. As of today, 218,795 of Tennessee’s 6.8 million residents have been tested. Here’s the top four things you need to know for today:

1| Lynchburg’s official count remain three. Moore County continues to reflect three cases with 184 Moore County residents tested. Regionally, the counts are as follows: Bedford County (201), Coffee County (45), Franklin County (36), and Lincoln County (16).

2 | State stops updating Mayor Lewis daily. According to Mayor Lewis, the Tennessee Department of Health will no longer update her office daily about new confirmed cases. Instead they will personally update every time that number increases by a factor of five.

3 | Republican officials want COVID restrictions listed. On Tuesday, Republican Party leadership from eight Middle Tennessee counties sent an open letter to Governor Bill Lee asking for a repeal of the state-mandated COVID-19 restrictions. The letter was signed by leadership from Coffee, Giles, Lawrence, Lincoln, Marshall, Maury, Perry, and Wayne counties. Membership from Moore County did not sign the letter.

4 | Mass prison testing begins this week. According to Governor Lee’s Unified Command Group, every Tennessee Department of Corrections prison inmate and state will be tested for COVID-19 this week.

{The Lynchburg Times is an independently owned and operated newspaper that publishes new stories every morning. Covering Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

Public Library will offer boat safety exams … by appointment

LYNCHBURG — The Moore County Public Library (MCPL) announced today that they will offer the TWRA Boating Exam test by appointment beginning on May 18.

Any Tennessee resident born after January 1, 1989 must show a TWRA-issued wallet Boating Safety Education Certificate as proof of successful completion of the TWRA Boating Safety exam to drive a boat on public waters. The certification is not required if there is an adult (18 years old or older) on board to take immediate control of the vessel.  However this adult, if born after January 1, 1989, must have the boating education certification. 

According to the library, the test takes around two hours to complete and appointments will be available on on Monday, Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and Fridays in either a 10 a.m. or 12 p.m. time slot.

By law, all boating students must pass a proctored exam administered by an approved TWRA representative. Boating study guides are available at MCPL or online by clicking here and go to the Tennessee section.

For more information, visit the TWRA’s Boating Education website. To set up an appointment to take the exam, call the public library at 931-759-7285. •

{The Lynchburg Times is an independently owned and operated newspaper that publishes new stories every morning. Covering Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

DREMC: Monday night’s storm increases power outages

Monday’s night’s thunderstorms brought more downed trees, broken power poles, and damaged transformers. DREMC reports just 49 Lynchburg residents still without power. {File Photo}

Southern, middle got hit hard on Sunday leaving 19,000 Duck River Membership Corporation (DREMC) customers without power at the height of the outages. Broken poles, downed power lines, and damaged transformers plus a host of fallen trees were reported from Columbia to Sewanee.

Then on Monday night, our area got hit again with another round of severe thunderstorm only compounding the issue. As of Tuesday morning an additional 5,000 homes were without power including 200 Moore County customers. By the publishing of this article that number reduced to 49.

According to DREMC, they’ve restored power to over 10,000 homes and crews will continue to work throughout the day to restore power.

You can get updates 24/7 at DREMC Outage Viewer by clicking here. •

{The Lynchburg Times is an independently owned and operated newspaper that publishes new stories every morning. Covering Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}

Essential: John Manis of American Craft Distillers of Lynchburg

{Editor’s Note: This is the eleventh of a multi-part series highlighting all the essential folks in Moore County. Readers nominated each interview subject. To nominate someone, email editor@lynchburg-times.com.}

It was an idea whose time had come … small-batch, artisan hand sanitizer. That’s the impression we get from John Manis — one of the co-owners of American Craft Distillers of Lynchburg. We met on a Friday afternoon recently at their location on the Lynchburg Square.

A native of Indiana, Manis came to southern, middle Tennessee by way of Orlando. He and his wife, Cathy, live in Tullahoma but own property on County Line Road.

Five years ago, he and Ray Tucker of Moore County, decided to open the Lynchburg Winery on the historic Lynchburg Square. In 2018, they added American Craft Distillers of Lynchburg. Today they produce wine with locally-grown grapes as well as distilled spirits like moonshine, rum, vodka, and, of course, whiskey. The distillery side is one hundred percent tourism based. They don’t ship whiskey or sell through a distributor. Instead, they rely of foot traffic from the square to move product.

“The square is where the magic is,” Manis says.

Though he didn’t know it at the time, whiskey-making was actually a family tradition.

“Right after we opened, my uncles messaged me to let me know that it’s actually in my blood,” he says. “My grandfather Kirkpatrick made moonshine in Rogersville near the Cherokee Dam. He was a corn farmer and owned a grist mill.”

It’s those whiskey making instinct and a desire to do good in his community that gave Manis the idea to start making hand-santizer out of the high-proof ethanol they use to produce spirits. American Craft Distillers of Lynchburg were one of the first of Tennessee’s smaller distilleries to produce it.

With his partner, Ray Tucker’s, role in the local healthcare scene it seemed like a natural fit. Tucker works as the Director of Surgical Services at Southern Tennessee Regional Health System in Winchester.

As the COVID-19 situation evolved, more and more individuals and institutions started meticulously cleaning and disinfecting multiples times a day. That increased usage disrupted the supply chain for regular sanitizers made from isopropyl alcohol. That’s when Manis decided to step in.

“We’ve got product. We could do this,” Manis says he told Tucker. And Tucker agreed.

As a small-batch distillery, the hand sanitizer project began small-batch as well … first in 16 gallon batches, then 55 gallon batches, and finally in 300 gallon batches to meet demand. The first 25 gallons they produced went to the Winchester hospital. After that, they started handing it out to Moore County first responders and healthcare professionals and then to the surrounding counties.

“We’re small,” Manis says. “We can’t help everybody but we can help our locals.”

According to Lynchburg Winery General Manager Alissa Fly, they donated hand sanitizer to as close as Bedford and Franklin counties and as far away as Huntsville and Murfreesboro. Manis says after the first round of deliveries, they started producing sanitizer to sell to consumers due to high demand.

“What they were normally using in a month, was gone in three days,” he says.

At this point, Manis says they were selling 100-200 bottles a day.

“The week before last,” Fly says. “I opened four minutes early at 10:56 a.m. at there was a line out the door. By 10:06 a.m., I’d sold 26 bottles and we completely sold out by noon.”

To date, they’ve sold around 2,000 consumer bottles … some in bulk to local trucking companies like Titan Transfer and Big G. Manis says the revenue from the consumer sales went right back into producing more hand sanitizer. For every one bottle they sell, they give away five more.

Manis says demanding is waning enough that he can slowly return to his bread and butter … distilled spirits but he’s been grateful for the experience.

“It’s been worth it because we know we’re helping our community,” he says. •

{The Lynchburg Times is an independently owned and operated newspaper that publishes new stories every morning. Covering Metro Moore County government, Jack Daniel’s Distillery, Nearest Green Distillery, Tims Ford State Park, Motlow State Community College, Moore County High School, Moore County Middle School, Lynchburg Elementary, Raider Sports, plus regional and state news.}